#1
Hey UG,

I'm having problem with memorizing the fretboard, I don't want to play a note that I don't know what it is... I tried to memorize it by theory but it didn't work

Please any suggestion to good way to memorize the fretboard?

I'm thinking of print stickers of the notes and stick it on every note on the fretboard, what do you thing?

Thank you
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#2
Just keep yourself as aware as possible of what you're doing in terms of notes and it'll stick eventually, it just takes time.
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#3
how long have you been working at it?

it took me over several months to memorize the fretboard to the point where I knew exactly what note I was playing when. then it took me several more months to be able to be told something like "play a melody with just C E G & B (chord tones of Cmaj7)"and be able to play all of them all over the fretboard with out taking the time to think about it...
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#4
Here are some of the things that helped me.

1. Fretboard Warrior - Free Software, it highlights a note on the fretboard and you name it.

2. Octaves - Learn the octave shapes and use them as a guide. Providing you know the musical alphabet, you can easily pick out the notes nearby (So in the below example, if you know where every F note is, then you can deduce that the E note is just 1 fret behind, and that G is 2 frets ahead)

Octaves

E|1 (F)--------------------------------13 (F)
B|-----------------------6 (F)--------------
G|-----------10 (F)-------------------10 (F)
D|3 (F)-----------------3 (F)---------------
A|------------8 (F)--------------------------
E|1 (F)--------------------------------13 (F)


Notice the pattern? Just the same as power chords really, with the exception of the 5th being removed (so technically nothing like power chords at all, but you know, same shape).

Power Chords with added Octave

E|----------------------------------------13(O)
B|-------------------------6(O)---------13(5th)
G|------------10(O)----- 5(5th)-------10(R)
D|3 (O)-----10(5th)----3(R)----------------
A|3 (5th)----8(R)----------------------------
E|1 (R)----------------------------------------


3. Learn all the notes on the E string - Since there are only 6 strings (unless of course you're playing a 7 or 8 string), and 2 of them are E, by learning one E string you immediately learn the second. 2 birds 1 stone.


4. Print off loads of these -

Fill them in when bored. Pay attention to the pattern of notes (examine them in 4ths/5ths or however you like) Notice that above every C is a F (except on G and B strings), find as many reminders as you can.

5. Stick this somewhere you can see it - Self explanitory.

6. Learn it in chunks - Using the above image, pick one fret to learn a day, or pick one note to learn a day. Some frets will be easier than others, namely those which contain no # or b notes:

5th fret
10th fret
12th fret (same as open strings)
17th fret

If you learn those first, then you can move onto the frets which contain just 1 #/b, and then 2#/b etc etc.

7. Learn scales - Your typical major scale shape

E|-------------------
B|-------------------
G|-------------------
D|---------------2-3
A|--------1-3-5-----
E|1-3-5-------------

If you know that the F major scale is F G A Bb C D E, and that those notes occur in that order, you can easily work out that the 3rd note you play is an A, or that the 4th note you play is a Bb. Since the shape is moveable, you can pick any root you want and work out the notes this way. Say you wanted to play in B major, you write down/find out the notes of the scale

B C# D# E F# G# A#

Even if B was the only note on the fretboard, you could find out the remaining 6 notes by following the shape and going up the scale.

E|
B|
G|
D|------------------8-9
A|---------7-9-11
E|7-9-11

You should also say the note out loud as you play to help you remember.

Hope that helps. The other piece of advice I can give is to email Sean and his have a look at his online academy, he has a course specifically designed for fretboard recognition and his ideas really do help.
Last edited by Calibos at May 26, 2011,
#5
It's important to remember that this is something you need to be doing all the time, there's no point spending half an hour trying to memorise note names if the rest of the time you keep referring to things in terms of frets and strings.
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#6
Yes it's a lot of repetition to memorize something - that's really all it takes.

I would break it into small increments at first, like one string at a time, or certain frets, certain notes whatever. When you've worked through one full set of divisions, move on to a totally different one.
Work on it 2x a day - for short times like 5-10 minutes each. That's enough.

And say (or sing) the note, the fret #, and string name out loud every time you play it.
That might seem odd... but it is a proven way to help the brain memorize.

Like those above me said... it will still take a few months or more until you memorize all notes, and it won't happen any time soon, unless you stick to the regular repetitions.
good luck
#8
^^ that's an interesting way.

I found the easiest and quickest way to teach for me has been to..

1. Learn all the notes on the Low E string only. I have them spend time on just this string.
It also teaches them the high E obviously... 2 strings down.

2. Learn all the notes on the A string. Again just memorize this alone.

3. Show that the D string is the same as the Low E they first learned, only 2 frets higher. They already know the Low E, this ones easy as they don't really need to learn anything new.

4. Show that the G string is the same as the A string, again only 2 frets higher. Again no real learning, just remembering what they already know.

5. Learn the B string. This ones really the only odd one out, but if you can play an open D chord.. your D note is from the third fret of this string.. so a good starting point.

This way, your really only "Learning" 3 strings. Low E, A and B.
#10
It just happens over time I guess. I can name any note on the guitar neck nearly instantly and I have never sat down to learn them. I just go on root notes, octaves chords or something. For example, the root note of an A is 2nd fret on the G, or where you place your middle finger in an A major chord. It's the same on the A shape barre chord. On the E shape barre chord, the root note is the lowest note in the chord. So an E major, it'd be the open E on the 6th string. It'd also be under your ring finger on the second fret D string.
#12
Quote by odranoel
So what is different about that course?


you pay them.
#13
Quote by odranoel
So what is different about that course?


It works.

Other methods work as well, of course. IMO, this one works better.

Note that I am not affiliated with the website in ANY way, nor do I gain anything by promoting them.

But given what you've said, it seemed to me that it might be what you need.

And hey, it's got a money back guarantee!
#14
Quote by Arby911
It works.

Other methods work as well, of course. IMO, this one works better.

Note that I am not affiliated with the website in ANY way, nor do I gain anything by promoting them.

But given what you've said, it seemed to me that it might be what you need.

And hey, it's got a money back guarantee!


What do you mean "given what said?" All I have "said" is "what is different about this course?"

I'm looking for more than "It works." I'm looking for some indication that this method is different from either CAGED systems or standard reference methods. $30 is a lot of money for (yet another) fretboard memorization system of unknown originality.
#15
Quote by odranoel
What do you mean "given what said?" All I have "said" is "what is different about this course?"

I'm looking for more than "It works." I'm looking for some indication that this method is different from either CAGED systems or standard reference methods. $30 is a lot of money for (yet another) fretboard memorization system of unknown originality.


My bad, I was transposing you and the OP.

$30 with a money back guarantee is chump change.
#16
Quote by Arby911
My bad, I was transposing you and the OP.

$30 with a money back guarantee is chump change.


To you, maybe. I was hoping for a bit more of a review.

Oh, well.
#18
After you learn every note on the fretboard, have a program quiz you. Take the quiz more than 1 time every 21 days and by then you'll know your shit.

If you do the first part and have instant recall you don't need to bother with the second obviously.
#20
what may be helpful is to play notes on the fretboard and say the note name as you play it. So you're looking where you've played to note + you're saying out loud what the note name is + you're feeling where the note is = greater chance of memorizing. Just do chromatic scales at first and then other scales (major, harmonic minor etc) so you simultaneously get familiar with what notes are in what scale.
#22
So I couldn't resist and tried this site:

http://rnbacademy.com

It's basically a memorization technique that simplifies how to remember where the notes are.

And the method used seems quite effective. It needs a bit of practice like with all systems but already with 2 days practice I can find any note on the the fingerboard in about 1-2 seconds.

I was so impressed with it, I actually signed up for their theory courses.....

I promise you guys that I don't work for them. And I am not advertising them. But I just thought I would mention that I thought it's not a bad little system. I can't really explain further as I don't want to lose them custom or revenue but it's worth a try.

There's a money back guarantee as well if you don't like it!!

Believe me, I scoured their completely before before I decided to try it, there are so many crappy sites out there. This article pursuaded me, apparently the owner Sean Christiansen posts on this quite a lot on this forum:

http://rnbacademy.com/main/interview-with-sean-christiansen-founder-of-the-rock-n-blues-guitar-academy/

To prove I am a regular guy, here are some clips of me learning Classical guitar at the www.delcamp.us classical guitar forum:

http://www.youtube.com/user/Morpeli?feature=mhee#g/a
Last edited by qwertyman2010 at Jun 20, 2011,