#1
Ok so I've gotten to the point where I can find a root note pretty quickly when need be, and I can determine the key of a song within 10 seconds or so of someone playing it.

Now I initially learned the major scale via patterns, but recently I've started jamming with friends quite a bit and I'm finding it easier to just fumble around for the initial 10 seconds finding the key (none of the other guitarists I jam with know theory, but they're still very good and make stuff that sounds great), and then if we're in the key of say A major I take the formula of WWHWWWH and apply that.

So if I'm on the D string in standard tuning I know the A is the 7th fret, so from there if I apply the formula, I can go back a whole step 3 times before a half step, or I can go forward two whole steps before a half step.

If I do this, and keep in mind where the As are on the other strings I can not only move horizontally, but I can move vertically. This is a slow process at the moment, but I'm hoping that it will speed up as I gain experience.


Is taking this direction a good idea? Will it be beneficial in the future when I want to understand and apply intervals? (at the moment, when improvising, I just play what I hear in my head and I can translate it decently to the fretboard without interval knowledge, but I think eventually learning intervals could take that "decently" to an "easily")

Any advice on where to go from here/if this is a good idea?

Thanks for your guys' time..
#2
If it works for you and you're happy...use it. As for if it's a good idea, for me, no, for you it may well be. I teach and play differently, so your way for me wouldn't rank high on my list, but who cares, really...use what you have and if its meaningful to you, work it out. It certainly doesn't sound bad to me, and you seem to enjoy the discovery process. I'm not worried for you. Have fun

Sean
#3
Quote by Sean0913
If it works for you and you're happy...use it. As for if it's a good idea, for me, no, for you it may well be. I teach and play differently, so your way for me wouldn't rank high on my list, but who cares, really...use what you have and if its meaningful to you, work it out. It certainly doesn't sound bad to me, and you seem to enjoy the discovery process. I'm not worried for you. Have fun

Sean

Thanks, always enjoy your responses.

I figure that since each string is a perfect fourth above each other string except G -> B = major third that I can use this relationship to eventually find intervals quite easy etc..
#5
I'm a fan of the formula route to constructing scales. With a pattern, you know that scale but only in the one position you're playing it in. With thw formula you can go all over the neck. So if it's working for you, stick with it.
#6
I always use #'s as a way of figuring out scales or quickly changing them around....For example....Major 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 Minor (Aeolian) 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7-8...By learning the names of the notes of each scale and a formula for creating them you'll quickly ascend your playing scale wise...This is just how I started looking at them when I was learning scales...Everyone is different!
#7
It's great that you're applying the formula on a single string-basis, but you've also got to be able to apply it quickly on a multiple-string basis. If you're on an A note on the D string and you need to play an A major scale, you should be able to know exactly where to go on the next few strings without thinking. If you end up blanking and having to just slide around on the D string using the whole-half formula, you're going to be at a disadvantage. You have to have a bit of both worlds. In my case, I have a few 1 octave formulas for my scales that can be jumped around from string to string, which allows me to play easily all over the neck, so long as I know where all my octaves are. The only problem with that is learning the relationship of the B string to the others so that you don't get confused when you have to play on the higher strings. Still, that's just the method that works for me. The important thing is to ask yourself what kind of solos you're going to be playing. If you want to be a guy who slides around the neck a lot and does a lot of harmonized lines, then knowing how to apply the pattern on single strings is a great way to look at things. If you want to be a crazy shredder and do speed runs all over the place, you're going to need to develop shapes that allow you to play vertical and horizontal runs with easy fingerings.