#1
I understand that you can't practice "Speed" on the guitar, only accuracy. Speed comes from accuracy, so understanding this, which is a better way to practice?

play my practice routine (a very long routine that practices string skipping, scale, hammer on pull offs, patterns, etc.) at an okay speed, then bring that speed up 4-5 beats every few days, or

Play the scale at an incredibly slow speed for me so i can play it perfectly for a long time (like 3-4 weeks) then double or even triple the speed (if possible)

I'm not sure which the best way to practice. if neither of these are good, then what would be the best?

Thank you! (BTW i can play fluenty (no mistakes) at about 65 bpms, i want to get this speed to at least 150 bpms. Is this possible in half a year?
#2
What does it mean that you can play fluently at 65 bpms? Eights? Sixteenths? What? Anyway the best way for me at least and I can play pretty fast (I've managed to play the harmonic minor at 16ths at 130bpm) is put the metronome on EXTRA SLOW like 40 BPM. Play note by note with alternate picking. After you've done this for about 10 mins put the metronome on 60 and play note by note with alt picking. Then after 10 more mins, keep the metronome on 60 and play the scale note by note but WITH SLUR ONLY! When you're done with that rinse and repeat. After 2-3 weeks you'll have raised your speed quite a lot. It's a fact that when you've trained your finger memory you'll be able to do it in your sleep. However, remember that being a good guitarist isn't all about speed Speed is just a tool at your disposal so don't concentrate mainly on that. Want proof? Listen to Sully Erna's new album :P
#3
Hi, I am working on 'accuracy' too, lol. For me, I've found it very effective to start at a fairly slow speed, play the scale, arpeggio or lick once, increase by 5bpm, play it again and keep increasing by increments of 5bpm until you reach the point when you start to play sloppily, THEN, decrease by 5bpm, playing the scale again as above until you reach a point where you can play comfortably, then play it 5 more times at this speed.

This method gives your muscles a good workout, but by reducing the speed back to where you can play perfectly again, it helps ingrain your muscle memory too. I got this method from the Guitar Speed Trainer, which I've found is a very useful tool for practicing.
#4
Quote by Dopemgs
What does it mean that you can play fluently at 65 bpms? Eights? Sixteenths? What? Anyway the best way for me at least and I can play pretty fast (I've managed to play the harmonic minor at 16ths at 130bpm)


Just as a kind word to someone who may appreciate it: that isn't fast. I'm not being harsh or anything but if you go around thinking that's fast someone a whole lot more of an arsehole than me might really call you out on it.

Quote by macashmack
I understand that you can't practice "Speed" on the guitar, only accuracy. Speed comes from accuracy, so understanding this, which is a better way to practice?

play my practice routine (a very long routine that practices string skipping, scale, hammer on pull offs, patterns, etc.) at an okay speed, then bring that speed up 4-5 beats every few days, or

Play the scale at an incredibly slow speed for me so i can play it perfectly for a long time (like 3-4 weeks) then double or even triple the speed (if possible)

I'm not sure which the best way to practice. if neither of these are good, then what would be the best?

Thank you! (BTW i can play fluenty (no mistakes) at about 65 bpms, i want to get this speed to at least 150 bpms. Is this possible in half a year?


1 - The speed will come when it comes, it might be possible in half a year it might not be, no one knows.

2 - It's BPM, not BPMs, the plural is inherent to the acronym.

3 - I'd say practice slowly and in a way that produces music for some of the time but spend the majority of your time actually playing; songs, jamming to backing, that kind of thing, if you've got something well practiced slowly and you know how it sounds, when you want that sound you should be able to pull it off. If you can't then obviously it needs more practice.

4 - If you're going to go with the "play to metronome, increase tempo" method, don't force yourself to up the speed in any given amount of time, only up the speed when you're comfortable with where you are at the moment.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at May 27, 2011,
#5
"slow is smooth, smooth is fast"

Word to live by.

Take it slow, get it right (clean) and then speed it up until you can play the same thing as fast as you can but still retain accuracy.

have you tried the 1-2-3-4 1-3-2-4 1-3-4-2-3-1-2 finger exercises? do those on each string up and down the neck, and then backwards. those will help warm up your hands and improve dexterity.
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This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

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#6
"super slow" practice is good for co-ordination, "okay speed" practise is a good way to learn tricky parts, and you can just jam and play at "full speed" to build strength and stamina. You should probably be doing them all.
#7
Yes, Freepower, all of the above!

Get Guitar Pro. Buy it, steal it, I don't care. Your integrity/eternal soul have nothing to do with guitar playing! In fact eternal damnation will probably help, so...

Guitar Pro is simply the coolest ****ing thing I've ever purchased for guitar, besides my Vox VT40+ practice amp.

I don't usually plug products, but I'm very, very, very happy with it. Granted it is retarded in some ways, but what do you expect?

As for developing technique and accuracy/speed (same thing)? Can't beat it.

All you need is to select the songs you want to learn that focus your practice routine on what you feel your weak spots are. I'm working through Poison Was The Cure right now because my lead playing really fell off last year. Used to be pretty good, now it's shit.

So I picked a song with a good, short solo that is a challenge, but not insane. A foundation of theory is absolutely necessary, but if you are already an advanced player like myself then GP should fill in all your gaps for you.

I can't tell you how many tabs I've downloaded only to scratch my head and think, "what the hell is this?!" Now that I can actually hear/correct the tabs, or say change the fingering to one that makes better sense to me, I can play virtually anything given time to study and work on it.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."