#1
Ok, many google searches and UG forum searches have not fully explained this, so I'm turning here for a definitive answer (if there is one)

I'm building a pedalboard (not the actual pedalboard, but buying pedals selectively with the intent of creating an effective rig). The board I have in mind will be fairly large and have at least 6 to 7 pedals but may push 10 or 12. Some will be true bypass some will not.

Now what I have learned from my googling is that too many true bypass pedals equal destroyed tone while other pedals have a buffer that push signal. I knew a guitarist once who had a dedicated buffer on his pedalboard, though I did not quite understand it at the time.

So with that info my question(s) would be

1. If I have a pedalboard with lots of pedals some true bypass some not, do I need a dedicated buffer?

2. If so where do I put the buffer before? after?

3. Suggestions on good buffers?

Any advice, help or clarification would be appreciated, dont feel like I really fully understand buffers.
#2
If you already have buffered bypass pedals, you don't really need a dedicated buffer.
Ideally you want the buffer as the first thing in your chain after the guitar, so if you have a buffered tuner or something like that you should be fine.
#3
Quote by littlephil
If you already have buffered bypass pedals, you don't really need a dedicated buffer.
Ideally you want the buffer as the first thing in your chain after the guitar, so if you have a buffered tuner or something like that you should be fine.

This, and if you have a long cable run to your amp at the end of the pedal board, then you'll want to have a buffer/buffered pedal.
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