#1
Is there any kind of contradiction between play electric guitar and flamenco guitar at the same time?

One technique can affect the other (in good or bad ways)?
#2
real flamenco guitar involves using your fingers. If you learn that way you can't just expect to pick up a pick and start shredding like you do with your fingers...
#4
Nope. You'll be fine to play both.

The fretboards will be different sizes, so you'll notice that moving from one to the other, but your fingers will adjust to whatever instrument you are playing without you even realizing it.

Have fun!
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#6
Nothing bad will happen, but there's not a huge amount of similarity in terms of the technique either. So don't just assume that the right way to do things on one guitar is right on the other as well.

Flameco is definitely a good thing to learn.
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#8
The main difference is that on electric guitar, your index finger stays fairly flat to mute unwanted noise, whereas with flamenco you'd almost always be fretting with the very tip of your finger. Aside from that, no big differences I'm aware of.
#9
Differences that come to mind are:
- different positioning of the guitar (flamenco is typically played with a footstool)
- more "vertical" technique since you don't need the strength you do with electric or acoustic
- a different left hand grip because of the huge neck
- more rigid assignment of right hand fingers to strings
- much less muting in flamenco - mostly you let it ring

there's probably more.
GMW hot-rod telecaster
GMW soloist
PRS Custom 24
The Illegal Les Paul
CAE 3+SE
Soldano SM-100R
Splawn 4x12

“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
#10
Quote by Even Bigger D
Differences that come to mind are:
- different positioning of the guitar (flamenco is typically played with a footstool)
- more "vertical" technique since you don't need the strength you do with electric or acoustic
- a different left hand grip because of the huge neck
- more rigid assignment of right hand fingers to strings
- much less muting in flamenco - mostly you let it ring

there's probably more.



I don't know what you mean by 'vertical' technique but playing flamenco definitely takes more effort that playing electric or acoustic. You need a greater amount of control over your hands to make sure you get the right sound and that the notes are clean.

Fretting on an electric or acoustic guitar is infinitely easier than fretting on a flamenco guitar.

Your left hand 'grip' doesn't change much either, if you already have good left hand technique, the transition shouldn't bother you at all.

There is no 'rigid assignment' of the right hand fingers to the strings. You use whatever finger you want for whatever string provided that it's logical and you are able to blend the tones so the listener can't tell which finger you're using.

And yes, you do let many of the notes ring in flamenco but that doesn't make it any easier. Keeping melody lines and figures smooth and uninterrupted is ALOT harder than muting everything else.
#12
I'd say there's not so much a difference or contradiction as a similarity. Both styles have a few different schools in them, but neither are as "formal" or set-in-stone as classical technique is. Which is mostly agreed on by it's practitioners how and what to do. Granted, there will be differences in how to shape your nails, but most of these are down to the player as no fingers are shaped the same either. The techniques though, tend to be the same universally, this does of course not mean that the style is no longer evolving as still new techniques and means of playing the instrument are being developed.

A few things of note, it's not that you will find contradictions in the styles that will screw up the other. Were you to play classical, you would find it harder as classical fretting technique is completely different, almost opposite of eletric fretting technique, and in most cases also concerning flamenco.

Where most guitarists tend to lean on their Index finger, in classical guitar that is one of the no-no's. While for classical music, or most music that is "prepared" it is a more reasonable technique, as it doesn't require as much effort from that finger alone, but divides it more properly across the whole hand, and you will be able to stretch further as well. This is better for that style, but terrible for "improvisational" styles. It is nearly impossible to improvise, and still play "anticipatingly", because that is exactly what it is. Electric and flamenco are the same way in this, so that would not bother you, as much of flamenco is also improvised on the spot.

What you will encounter though, is a very demanding right-hand technique. It is hard, real damn hard. You'll be using muscles you rarely use, you will NEED nails, so forget about 8-finger tapping, it is extremely hard to do without ruining the tips of your nails on metal-strings, normal tapping is almost undoable already and you'll have to try it with a straight finger almost aligned with the neck.

What you'll also encounter, is that it is extremely hard to serve two masters.

Electric guitar styles differ a lot, but most techniques are the same, and if they aren't, you can usually "get away with it" or transfer one technique to the other. Not so with this style, there are about 10 new techniques you'll, from the top of my head, at least. And keeping both styles growing, will simply take you three times longer than it usually would, because you have to concentrate on many different things. There is plenty to find, and anything you wish to know about flamenco feel free to ask.

Good luck
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