#1
My dad asked me what I wanted for graduation and even though I haven't decided if I even want a guitar, but I'd like to just simply know everything I can about these guitars so I can atleast have an idea because it will be hard enough to try to find all 4 of these so I can play them all.

Gibson Custom ES-339 Semi-Hollow with 30/60 neck

Gibson Custom ES-335 Satin Finish

Gretsch G6120

Gretsch Guitars G6118 Anniversary

I know these are different brand so I'm sure theres too many things that are different to point out, but it'd help alot if you could give me the main highlights of the guitar and what tones I could expect from each.

-thanks.

EDIT: If you'd like to help me king of focus in on a certain one, here is some information about my playing.

I play anywhere from blues, christian, rock, pop and maybe some country, if I'm forced to

My amp settings are usually set to about:

Bass:4
Mid:6
Treble:8
Reverb:2-3

I want a guitar that can get really warm and bluesy, but also one that can get really nice highs, that aren't ear piercing, and can handle a lighty distorted strum nicely.

IT does matter because I don't play heavy rock much, but it'd be nice if it could get a really heavy sound when using high gain/dist and a bright distortion sound simliar to eruption.

I'm basically looking for a do-it-all-axe, but like I said, I don't care if it doesn't handle high levels of dist/gain very well.
Last edited by Dmaj7 at May 27, 2011,
#2
if your looking for a do it all axe look at PRS not a semi hollow Gibson/Gretch. They are 1 Trick ponys, very good at what they do, but not a do it all. PRS has some awesome semi hollows, and if your willing to lay down $3000+ for a gibson why not get some thing much better?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#4
Quote by Robbgnarly
if your looking for a do it all axe look at PRS not a semi hollow Gibson/Gretch. They are 1 Trick ponys, very good at what they do, but not a do it all. PRS has some awesome semi hollows, and if your willing to lay down $3000+ for a gibson why not get some thing much better?


None of those guitars were $3000+, they ranged from about 1800-2300
#5
THat's true, the satin black 335 is only around $2100 or so.

It's far from a one trick pony too.
#6
Look for a used PRS semi-hollow mcarty it will be in the $2000ish range
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#8
You are making good life choices. I love all of those guitars. Spent lots of time with all of them. Ask for more specifics if you like - for now, you get the wall of text.

ES-339:
The neck's personal preference. I liked the 50's neck but the 30/60 is pretty cool too. The smaller size makes it sounds closer to a solidbody as far as holding up to higher gain, but it is definitely closer to a 335 than a Les Paul. The bridge pickup is tighter than on most semi-hollows, and overall the 339 sounds focused and 'open,' if that makes sense. It's a really, really good rock guitar - just the right size and hollow-ness for distortion, but also retains the cleans of a bigger semi-hollow.

The 335 is pretty classic, not much to say here. It's a great guitar but between it and the 339 I think most people will choose the 339. The 335 is a little sweeter on the highs and does a bit better for jazz and warm cleans on the neck with the tone rolled down, but the smaller body size on the 339 is a really big plus for most people.

The G6120 is a full hollowbody, so it's a lot different from the 335/9s. It's about as far opposite as a hollowbody can be from the Gibsons - where the ES' are dark and smooth and get chunky with gain, Gretsches are bright, "cluck," and get snarly with gain. The G6120 is really strong in the clean and mild OD category, but when you push the gain it doesn't retain its character the way the 339/5 do. It's a little harder to get used to if you're not accustomed to a full-size hollowbody. The electronics system is odd - it's got a pickup selector, a tone switch, a master volume, and two pickup volumes. I find the pickup volumes completely useless so if you're trying one out, just turn them both all the way up and use the switches and master volume. I really love the tone switch, but some people prefer volume knobs. If you get the 6120, get the amber flame. Way sexier than the standard orange.

The 6118 sounds pretty close to the 6120, as does the Country Club. The body size goes Anny-6120-CC, small to large. The CC also has a spruce top which sounds sweeter on the highs than the other two. If you're getting a Gretsch, you should really, really get one with a Bigsby. They're a pain in the ass to string the first time, but you'll figure that out quickly. The big advantage to the Bigsby on a Gretsch is that it adds bass and weight to the tone, so they really cluck beautifully but also sound massive. A non-Bigsby Gretsch is jangly and sounds good in a band setting, but if you're trying to fill a room the Bigsby's the extra edge.


And now for some unsolicited advice:
As much as I love Gretsches, there are two things to look out for:
-Feedback is going to be an issue if you play loudly, with a bunch of gain, and sit or stand close to your amp. It's usually easily remedied, but if your band has a tiny little rehearsal space and you're pushing a DSL100, you should not buy a full hollow.
-They are old-school guitars with "That Great Gretsch sound." They do twang, and they do cluck. If you play one, you'll know if you love it. It's a very distinctive tone. If you play two Gretsches and don't care for how they sound, don't bother chasing down a third - it's going to be voiced like the first two. That's not to say they all sound the same, but Gretsch guitars all have a really distinct signature tone and you're not going to find one that sounds completely different like you would between a 335 and a flying V (Except the malcolm young model, but that doesn't count).

Nutshell synopsis:
The Gibsons are better if you're using crunch more than clean. The Gretsches are nicer if you tend to do clean or rhythm work.
From there, the differences become more subtle.
#9
Thanks Roc, youre amazing. And for the record, I enhoy the "wall of text"

I mean as far as it sounds, the 339 fits me the best, but I won't makethe final judgement until I play them, of course.

I also don't have a great guitar neck vocabulary, I just play them to know what neck I like but I do know that I like thin, smooth necks.

So what are the differences between the 30/60 and the 50s neck?
#10
Quote by Robbgnarly
if your looking for a do it all axe look at PRS not a semi hollow Gibson/Gretch. They are 1 Trick ponys, very good at what they do, but not a do it all. PRS has some awesome semi hollows, and if your willing to lay down $3000+ for a gibson why not get some thing much better?


You haven't owned any Semi-Hollow....?

If you had - you wouldn't give that advice !

#11
Quote by Dmaj7
Thanks Roc, youre amazing. And for the record, I enhoy the "wall of text"

I mean as far as it sounds, the 339 fits me the best, but I won't makethe final judgement until I play them, of course.

I also don't have a great guitar neck vocabulary, I just play them to know what neck I like but I do know that I like thin, smooth necks.

So what are the differences between the 30/60 and the 50s neck?

The 50s neck is fat. It's bigger than anything you're likely to have played at Guitar Center except perhaps on the Les Paul BFG.
The 60/30 is a 60's neck with .30 inches added - so, just a bit fatter than the 60's neck you've probably experienced on Gibson/Epiphones before.
#12
Quote by Roc8995
The 50s neck is fat. It's bigger than anything you're likely to have played at Guitar Center except perhaps on the Les Paul BFG.
The 60/30 is a 60's neck with .30 inches added - so, just a bit fatter than the 60's neck you've probably experienced on Gibson/Epiphones before.


Do you think its smaller than my Taylor? I know its an acoustic, but it has a very slim profile.
#13
They are probably both larger. I'm not familiar with that model of Taylor but if it's slim for an acoustic, the 60/30 and the 50s will both be fatter.
#14
Hmm well I really hope the neck isn't too fat, because it seems like a great guitar. Necks are one of my biggest factors though. Do you know of any hollow bodies you'd recommed that have a slimmer neck?
#15
the 339s 335's are good if you want that classic semi hollow sound.

I love my 336 though. the neck isn't too fat.

the prs necks aren't fat.

acoustic guitars usually have pretty beefy necks though.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#16
i know, but my taylor is extremely thin. I just got really used to a strats neck. I'll have to play this guitar though. I mean, I'd play it first regardless.
#17
It doesn't sounds too bad then, I just don't have that much experience with different necks.