#1
how do you write prog?? ive heard about using weird time signatures and stuff, but basically what makes proggressive(typically rock) different from other genres... I like listening to king crimson,rush and others like that but i cant figure out how you should make prog music before making it however you want....sorry for the confusing post...if its confusing to you.....thanks for your help!!YAY!!!!
#4
Your first step is to educate your self on Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Modern orchestra music. Movie themes don't count!
#5
listen to Supper's Ready 21 times. That should give you an idea, ol chap
#7
Learn theory, then use it to progress a genre.... I dont know... thats my take on it.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#8
i used to be the biggest proghead....now its like **** that, just make your music. people will label it whatever the **** they want. the mars volta think they play punk and every1 calls it prog. just write the sounds that come to your head. if sounds aren't coming to your head in a cohesive way you might need to learn some theory and train your ears a bit, and once the sounds start coming and your creativity and talent is easily translated into songs and musical skills, just do whatever you really want to do.
#9
Quote by dabucket
how do you write prog?? ive heard about using weird time signatures and stuff, but basically what makes proggressive(typically rock) different from other genres... I like listening to king crimson,rush and others like that but i cant figure out how you should make prog music before making it however you want....sorry for the confusing post...if its confusing to you.....thanks for your help!!YAY!!!!


re: king crimson
http://www.andrewkeeling.ukf.net/Keeling-TheConstruKctionOfLight.html
#10
the genre 'prog' uses a lot of long during progressions and big intervals.... like a row of fiths....sounds always proggy....

Of course orog should not be a genre but there are clischee inside the prog society...

rhythm should be kinda variating 5/4 7/4 3/4. or use a 5notes lick within a 4/4.
that creates brainache...****s your synapsis up....


use some fine chords that are unusual....
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IF YOU READ 'H' I MEAN 'B'

GERMAN H = AMERICAN B

#11
Try doing a lot of listening to groups in this category. Those would include Yes, Genesis, Rush, King Crimson, Emerson Lake & Palmer.

Here are some basics about progressive rock:
They are not afraid of using keyboards
They often use odd meter time signatures
They often change time signatures within a single song
They are not afraid to create purely instrumental tracks with no vocals
Their chord progressions can be unique and unusual, buy they usually avoid sounding too much like jazz.
The singing tends to be mid to high range. There are not too many top-tier progressive rock bands with "Barry White" vocalists.
The lyric themes center around myths, magic, and epic tales much more than pop/rock music in general.
The music often has a busy, technical quality to it. This is probably a large reason why it is called "progressive". The music is trying to "progress" past simple structures, simple ideas, and simple to play music parts.

It will be helpful for you to learn how to play a lot of the music. You are what you eat.

Probably the simplest way to get started is with the rhythm. Try making chord progressions that use odd time signatures, and ones that change time signatures within the piece itself.

As a "stealth" quasi-progressive rock track, check out Peter Gabriel's "Salisbury Hill". That song is in 7/4 and became a pop hit. This was long after he was in Genesis. But he "sneaked" a 7/4 onto pop radio. Brilliant!
Last edited by tmcdaniels at May 29, 2011,
#12
Quote by tmcdaniels
But he "sneaked" a 7/4 onto pop radio. Brilliant!


So did Pink Floyd with "Money" and the Beatles with "All You Need Is Love"!