#1
I had about 3 months of lessons with a really great college prof but at the moment I'm stuck in a tiny town with no good classical or flamenco teachers... I'm probably just going to take piano lessons (I want to be able to play Chopin anyways ) to learn how to read music again (used to know as a kid, forgot ) and I'm hoping that'll make it easier for when I learn how to read music on the guitar.

But I'm wondering... should I bother practicing classical guitar without a teacher to correct technique errors and such? I feel terrible right now because I haven't practiced in like 2 years, and I desperately want to get better, but at the same time, I don't want to get into habits that will screw me up later when I *do* move and can get a good teacher.
#2
teacher???? dedication is what you realy need. stop fiddling and just play. your procrastinating well i need a teacher to play, well i need a new e string to play, ah well ill just play piano. no wait i need to learn how to read sheet music.......... if you want to teach yourself, teach yourself. if you want a teacher and are not comfortable teaching yourself then get a teacher. point is make up your mind. if you never start now. how are you supposed to get good?
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#3
I'm not a complete noob lol, I practiced a decent amount (maybe 3 hours a day on average?) for about 2 years (on electric mostly, but then switched to classical more cause I enjoy it more)... it's just my (near world class) classical guitar teacher at college told me I probably *shouldn't* learn on my own because I could pick up a ton of bad habits that would set me back.

I have no problem continuing to practice electric on my own, but unfortunately my electric broke and I don't have the money for a new (good one) atm.
#4
If you want to be a serious player, a teacher is more or less necessary to be good at classical guitar. If you just want to play for the fun of it, go right ahead but as always, play logically and don't force anything.
#5
I wanna be really good, but still as a hobby (not looking for a career out of it).

I guess I'd like to hear from experienced classical guitarists (who've actually been taught correct technique)... should I be able to correct mistakes later down the road without TOO much trouble so I can get down to practicing now?
#6
I dont play classical guitar but do play Double bass and from the point of view of a demanding classical instrument yes you will need a teacher. A week can go by between lessons and you might drop your hand while practising or any little thing that will be overall damaging to your technique which will lead to sloppyness which is a lot more difficult to get rid of latter on then rectifying it now. Even if you could just get a lesson once a fortnight somewhere.

They dont have to be great but someone else will spot problems you havent so keep that in mind.

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#7
Quote by WNxScythe
I wanna be really good, but still as a hobby (not looking for a career out of it).

I guess I'd like to hear from experienced classical guitarists (who've actually been taught correct technique)... should I be able to correct mistakes later down the road without TOO much trouble so I can get down to practicing now?



Depends on how big the 'mistake' is but generally, reworking your technique after practicing the 'wrong' way can be a bitch.

Among the most experienced and 'best' classical guitarists there are so many different ways to play and it's likely each new teacher you see will tell you something different. Whatever they do to play, they've made it work for them and it may not necessarily work for you. I've learnt from some world reknowned classical guitarists and they all had different ways of teaching and applying technique. They all had their valid points and all and some downsides.

If you have a keen eye, you could try analysing John William's technique

I don't know what you mean by 'really good', but, if you want to be 'really good' I would still recommend getting a teacher. None of the great players were self taught (with the exception of maybe Segovia but his technique's horrid by today's standards anyway).
Last edited by XianXiuHong at May 28, 2011,
#8
I believe it's really important you need a good teacher.

I followed classical guitar from my 7 until my 12 and after that I didn't touch a guitar for 10 years. Now I'm playing again since 1 year and for a few months I had a teacher(Due to work I couldn't follow anymore lessons).

Anyway during those few months I advanced much quicker compared to studying on my own. On the internet you just find too much information and different opinions you're not sure what will work and what won't, a teacher with a lot of teaching experience will already have a filtered a good amount of information and he'll know what works for a certain type of player.

From a teacher you can get instant feedback, but from a book you can't be sure if your doing it right, you'll have to record a video and post it on youtube :P, wich takes so much more extra time.

XianXiuHong: What's so horrid about Segovia's technique?
#9
You never stop learning how to play the guitar.. I started teaching myself how to play the guitar and I have seen great improvement.. using internet is just some steps below using a teacher.. but do not forget to take it seriously.. don't just strum the strings..
#10
Quote by videlchi
XianXiuHong: What's so horrid about Segovia's technique?


There are stupid amounts of tension in his playing and his right hand technique doesn't allow for a good counterpoint sound.

His Bach sounds so laboured, the sound's try and it's barely correct stylistically. He plays Bach like a guitarist, not a musician. His free stroke technique is too tense aswell, his hand jumps up and down far too often, it's inefficient.

His posture is awful, his body is making compensations for bad balance.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBQfHJA2Lng

He's leaning over to help himself balance, you shouldn't need to do that if you're sitting properly. You won't be able to play a recital and feel great afterwards if you sit like that and it's asking for back problems.

He doesn't use his elbow to help his position shifting, it's just the left hand that has to do all the work.

There's heaps more but those are the most obvious right there.

I'm not denying the MASSIVE contribution he made to bringing the guitar back to the concert stage and his transcriptions, I admire him for that but as a guitar player, he's nothing special at all.

Compare him to John Williams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPfZVflJdp0

You'll see the difference.
#11
Quote by XianXiuHong
His free stroke technique is too tense aswell, his hand jumps up and down far too often, it's inefficient.

His posture is awful, his body is making compensations for bad balance.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBQfHJA2Lng

He's leaning over to help himself balance, you shouldn't need to do that if you're sitting properly. You won't be able to play a recital and feel great afterwards if you sit like that and it's asking for back problems.

He doesn't use his elbow to help his position shifting, it's just the left hand that has to do all the work.

There's heaps more but those are the most obvious right there.



Who cares, if it sounds good, it's good. It sounded like music to me. I'm sorry I just let myself get annoyed by snobbery again.
#12
Quote by Tinderwet
Who cares, if it sounds good, it's good. It sounded like music to me. I'm sorry I just let myself get annoyed by snobbery again.



What's your problem, buddy? I haven't done anything to you but you're being an outright dick to me, stop it.

Surprise surprise, some people have different standards for music that you do. What if someone wanted to learn the way Segovia plays and nothing else? What I'm trying to do is show the difference between someone who plays with a logical technique and someone who plays with an illogical technique.

Chances are, people aren't going to explore the differences in technique because they're already comfortable with the way they're playing and they don't know any better than what they already have. Do you have something against me trying to show someone a way of playing that's infinitely more comfortable and will allow their capacity to actually make music to be reached?

Ok, it sounds like music to you, so what? Are you the be all end all of music opinion? Answer's no. **** off. I'm not the be all end all of music opinion either but I'm not the one who's starting shit, am I?
#13
Glad to see you being calm under pressure, pal. Anyway, I liked the Segovia vid, despite his horribly awful technique and posture. I hope I didn't cause you nightmares with my opinion, Mr. (or Ms.?) Classical Guitar God(dess?).
#14
Quote by Tinderwet
Glad to see you being calm under pressure, pal. Anyway, I liked the Segovia vid, despite his horribly awful technique and posture. I hope I didn't cause you nightmares with my opinion, Mr. (or Ms.?) Classical Guitar God(dess?).



Not at all, Mr. Superior (who also happens to be deaf?)

You are also incredibly helpful to the TS. Bravo.
Last edited by XianXiuHong at Jun 4, 2011,
#15
Come on guys. An argument about this kind of thing is a bit childish.

Tinderwet, Janette can't have her own classically trained opinion about Segovia's technique? It obviously seems to be her forte. And this "musical snobbery" isn't her just plain hating on Segovia without reason. She's clearly stated why she feels he is inadequate as a classical player(not guitar player) while still acknowledging his achievements for the classical guitar world. She's entitled to her own opinion. Calling someone a snob straight off the bat is a terrible way to introduce your own opinions.

Janette, you may not be the one starting with the rude comments, but you certainly aren't helping diffuse the the situation. I've seen you around this forum and I certainly expected better from you.

To the both of you--I expect members within the Acoustic & Classical forum to have the right attitude and manners when leaving posts. If this cannot be done, I will have to take action.
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