#1
Hey guys!

I'm going to be doing some recording soon and had a few questions about mix usage given my specific setup. I have 3 SM57's, a Beta 52a, a RØDE condensor, and will be getting a Sterling ST77 condensor shortly.

I'll be using the two condensors as overheads, the Beta as the kick mic (obviously), and will have one SM57 on the snare, and another micing the hi-hat. That leaves me with one extra SM57 and 3 toms that need to be miced (2 mounts, one floor). I was thinking about just putting it in between the two mounts and letting the overheads pickup the floor tom, but I worry the condensors won't pickup the thump. What're everyone's thoughts on this?
EDIT: Or would it be wiser to use the extra dynamic mic as a second kick mic?

Also, the kick drum I will be using doesn't have a mic hole in the head, will putting the mic right in front suffice or is there a better alternative?

Thanks!
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Last edited by JWD32792 at May 28, 2011,
#2
Use the condensers as overheads for sure. Just beware, though, they will sound a little different to one another as they are different mics. Not necessarily a bad thing, just something to be wary about.
Again, like you said, I would use the Beta 52 on the kick drum, and one of the 57's on the snare.
I would not mic the hi hat with a 57. To do the job properly you need a condenser rather than a dynamic.
I would try using one of the 57's to capture two of the toms: centering it between the two toms. You will have to play around with the exact placement.
Finally, I would use the remaining 57 to mic the floor tom.

My kick drum does have a hole in it, so I don't have much experience on mic'ing unported kick drums. You just gotta play around with placement. I'm sure someone else on UG will chime in with some more (maybe different) advice.
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Last edited by jon93971 at May 28, 2011,
#3
Quote by jon93971
I would not mic the hi hat with a 57. To do the job properly you need a condenser rather than a dynamic.


Yeah, I'm just going based off of the supplies at hand. I have a couple Sure performance condensors, I PG58 and a PG48, definitely not the best mic's in the world, but would they be better suited for the hi-hat vs. an SM57?
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Into:
Whammy IV>Pitchblack>Dunlop 536Q>Fulltone Fulldrive 2>Hardwire TL-2>MXR 10 Band>Line 6 M13
Into:
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#4
I've found that when I mic hi-hats, I rarely ever use it in the actual mix. The snare mic always picks up a lot of hi-hat and whatever it doesn't get, the overheads do. I think getting good consistent sounding toms is more important than that tiny bit of hi-hat you'll be using from that mic.
#5
Quote by sandyman323
I've found that when I mic hi-hats, I rarely ever use it in the actual mix. The snare mic always picks up a lot of hi-hat and whatever it doesn't get, the overheads do. I think getting good consistent sounding toms is more important than that tiny bit of hi-hat you'll be using from that mic.

Exactly.
Mic'ing the hi hat is probably the last thing that I would mic on my kit... I'm not saying it's not important, but like sandyman said, almost all the hi hat you're ever going to need is picked up from the snare mic, but mainly the overheads.
57's on the toms will pick up so much more body than the overheads. It does depend on what sound you're after, though.
If you do really want to mic the hi hat, try using the PG's that you have. No harm at all in trying They will probably sound crisper than a 57, but they may or may not actually sound better. However, whether someone sounds good or not is completely up to you. 'Tis personal preference. If you like the sound, by all means use the PG's.
My current acoustic group:

Fiftieth Parallel

Martin Guitars
Elixer Strings
Acoustic amplification
BOSS pedals

Last edited by jon93971 at May 28, 2011,
#6
Yea, you can make a good mix without micing the hi-hat separately. It will blend into the overheads. Also, if you've got any spare equipment, I would definiately use it to mix the snare from the underside. You should do that to get more of the characteristic "snare" sound (not sure what the word is in english, but in swedish it's Sejermatta).
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#7
I'd probably go with 2 57's on the snare (top and bottom), the third on the floor tom, and the PG58 between the 2 rack toms. It's unlikely that the drummer will frequently hit the 2 rack toms at the same time so most of the time you can probably cut out the hits from each and put them on separate channels so that you can gate & EQ them differently and pan them properly - I'd say it's more important to have the snare mic'd from the top and bottom than to have mics on each individual tom, depending on the style you're recording of course.
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