#1
My band needs a recording microphone to record out of a basement for a low price. Anyone got a suggestion? It has to pick up low notes from a 5 string bass and 22nd fret notes on a guitar. Reducing background noise would be optimal. We currently use a camera and there is too much background noise and too low quality.
#2
sm 57 is a great mic for cheep i would go with that
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#3
Quote by selkies
sm 57 is a great mic for cheep i would go with that

/thread (made by shure)
#4
No, I mean a mic for recording any instrument and saving an mp3/wav etc. to use on Audacity or any other kind of recording program.
#5
Yeah, the Shure SM57 is hands down what you want for amplified guitars.

EDIT: I'd still go with the SM57. It's easily the most versatile/best value mic at a lower price range.
Last edited by mattvl at May 28, 2011,
#7
I need to be able to save a sound file of a song to use on my Audacity. It can't be a cheap crap mic either, I'm looking for something that will sound good on my iTunes library. I don't need a mic like a Shure SM 57 (I have an SM58) I need something that can record me and upload files to a laptop.
#9
Quote by gateway01


Unless you're willing to drop some pretty serious money on a live recorder, you'd be much better off just recording the band with an SM57 through an interface honestly. It's going to be a lot better for you to track each instrument one by one. Those live recorders aren't that great until the $200+ price range (imo). Good luck, I'm putting in my vote for an SM57 and tracking instrument by instrument.
#10
SM57 + interface (m-audio, presonus, ART, makes some nice cheap interfaces)
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#11
Although SM57's are great all-round microphones, I recently purchased a Rode M3 which is cheaper than an SM57 and it is far better in regards to quality. You'll need an interface as well as others have already stated. Pro Tools is considered the industry standard which generally come with an M-Box of some sort.
#12
I'm kind of new to recording, could you explain to me an interface please?
#13
Quote by gateway01
I'm kind of new to recording, could you explain to me an interface please?

To put in in simple terms, a recording interface is the middle man between your mic(s) and your computer. Mic->interface->computer. An interface will have one or more mic inputs and usb or firewire output so you can connect to your computer.
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#14
Quote by gateway01
My band needs a recording microphone to record out of a basement for a low price. Anyone got a suggestion? It has to pick up low notes from a 5 string bass and 22nd fret notes on a guitar. Reducing background noise would be optimal. We currently use a camera and there is too much background noise and too low quality.


I wouldn't use a '57 for this personally.



Too much rolloff on the bottom-end.

I'd be looking at a large diaphragm condenser.

Which one depends entirely on your price range.
#15
it depends on exactly what you want....if you just strictly want to mic a room and have a rough copy of a practice session i would suggest a usb condenser mic....mxl makes one that is a great mic, i have the mxl 9000 (non-usb model), you can just sit it in the middle of the room and it picks up everything great. Its always better to work your way up to having some sort of setup where you can mic everything.....when we jam i have a shure sm-57 on every guitar cab along with one on the toms/snare/hi-hat but thats the beauty of having a full set of microphones, a few mixers, and both a tascam us800 and us122.....if i were to just use one mic to get a decent sounding recording i would go with my mxl9000
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#16
Record direct.

Screw mics!

And retro: The low E is 160 Hz!!

The best way to record a bass is direct. Plug it direct into the interface, it's hot enough!

Or use a tube pre and overdrive it. Sounds pretty good. There is absolutely no reason to mic a bass, unless you just dream of running an extra mic for no reason.

If later you decide your direct guitars need to sound like they are miked, then run 'em through your stereo and mic it!

Easy.
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Last edited by Bubonic Chronic at May 31, 2011,
#17
As for room: the lowest-noise way to record room is to play a mix back into a room and record that.

To decrease noise increase the volume! Crank the mix to painfully-loud, 130dB or whatever you can stand, and then hit record and go out for a drink!

When you are back from your drinking binge your "room" will be recorded. Chop it up as you want to and mix it behind the rest of your tracks.

That way if some douchebag walks in halfway through your jam you can just cut it out before the room mix goes down. He'll be like, "COOL, BRO, I'M ON TAPE!" and you can just give him the metal horns and say, "Yep!" and mix his bitch ass outta there.
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#18
Only person to speak complete sense here: retrocausality.

Bubonic Chronic: I dunno what planet you live on; on this one the low E of a bass guitar sits around 40Hz... and on a 5 string, the low B is around 30Hz. As for miking a bass... there are LOTS of reasons why you would mic up a bass amp. The sound of a bass amp pushing lots of air through the speakers (plus the circuitry and EQ of the amp alone) have a huge impact on the sound, and I find the best combination is to split the signal and take a clean DI of the bass, as well as sending the other half through a large bass amp and miking one of the speakers with a mic suited to kick/bass. And then you go on and suggest the best way to record a room sound is to play the mix back in the room... what on earth are you on about? That isn't the room sound of live instruments... that's the room sound of a full mix, going through colouration via speakers, thus not even giving off the same frequencies as the instruments, and then being given one set amount of room ambience to all instruments... That's a ridiculous idea, hence why people choose different reverbs for different applications!

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#19
Wow, thanks for the...very...mixed feedback. Does anyone have a good price range for me for recording a 4 person band through an interface? (Product names please, and we're on a low budget.) How about miking? Also, I already have a Shure SM58, could I use that?
#21
SM57


I love this forum due to the fact that 95% of the people who post here think they know what they're talking about but have no clue (It used to be 90%, congrats on making me raise this). Everyone needs to take 5 seconds and read a thread before jumping to "Do this, /thread" instead of assuming that everything they know is right (This includes myself). As Retro pointed out, the SM57 rolls off at about 200hz and a bass at its highest freq maybe hits 200hz. Please, do some research people cuz honestly, you're suggesting something that isn't going to work. You'd get more use out of shoving a SM57 up someones ass than recording a bass guitar with it.

Anyways, rant aside (sorry, I had to), heres my suggestion. Pick up a Line 6 Pod Studio GX. It'll cost you $100ish but its perfect for what you plan on using it for. It includes Pod Farm which is a solid amp sim program (it includes both amp sims and effects for Guitar and Bass). Use your favorite recording program (except Audacity, it doesn't work with that. Try Reaper, its free-ish and easy to use) and you're good to go.
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#22
Quote by gateway01
Wow, thanks for the...very...mixed feedback. Does anyone have a good price range for me for recording a 4 person band through an interface? (Product names please, and we're on a low budget.) How about miking? Also, I already have a Shure SM58, could I use that?


A '58 is basically the same mic as a '57, the '57 is just a little bit more directional than a '58. Your '58 is a vocal mic primarily, with a presence peak in the upper mids and a fairly hefty low frequency falloff, each of which will assist a vocal to stand out over the rest of the instruments, (though it'd also do a pretty good job at close-miking a guitar amp or a floor-tom if you were multitracking) but for recording a whole band you'd find it a bit lacking.

"Interface" is just a posh name for a soundcard for your computer.

If you're using the "1 microphone in the middle of the room recording all the instruments at once" technique, then you only need 1 input on the interface so something like an M-Audio Audiophile 2496 will be more than adequate for your needs.

If you are using this method, I'd probably look at an omnidirectional mic with as flat a response as you can find in your price range. You might try the Audiotechnica AT8010. You can probably pick up a new one for less than £150 and when on-axis (which means pointing right at the instrument / amplifier in question) it has a reasonably flat low-end response. The beauty of an omni is that it picks up sound well from all directions, not just where it's pointing, though you will find the bottom end rolls off more from the peripheral directions than from right in front.

If it's a condenser mic that you end up using (like the aforementioned AT8010), then don't forget you'll need phantom power which means you'll need a mini- mixing desk too.

Something like a cheap Behringer will be perfectly adequate - they're cheap as chips and do the job in this sort of situation just fine.

The more you spend the better a result you'll get (up to a point) but if you just want the 1-microphone-in-the-middle-of-the-room sound (and price range) then you could do a lot worse than this omni -> mixer -> audiophile route.

Audiophile 2496 soundcard / audio interface - $65 USD / £65 UKP
Audiotechnica AT8010 omni mic - $148 USD / £160 UKP
Behringer XENYX-502 mixer - $39 USD / £35 UKP

So, that's around $250 / £250 in total.

With this setup, don't expect your demo to sound like your favourite band's latest album, but expect it to sound better than an iPhone in the middle of the room.
Last edited by retrocausality at Jun 1, 2011,
#23
Quote by lockwolf
You'd get more use out of shoving a SM57 up someones ass than recording a bass guitar with it.


Er... well, despite living near San Francisco, I wouldn't know about inserting a mic anally... but I can say that I mic my bass amp with an SM58 and it sounds just fine (...to me, anyway). Granted, I wouldn't be confident recommending that course of action to the OP due to the fact that I have no experience with 5-stringers, but...
#24
Ya instead of the SM57 I would go with a Electro Voice RE-20. Has worked well on Bass cabs, Snare and Guitar cabs, even works quite well with vocals. Well worth the money...
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