#1
Since me and my band practice in a little room, me and the other guitarist usually get that nasty high pitched feedback when we turn our amps up, especially mine. i was wondering if this thing would get rid of that high pitched feedback.
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Ebtech-HE-2-XLR-Hum-Eliminator-with-XLR-104781976-i1371896.gc

incase you need to know, my amp is a Marshall MG Series 50 DFX and my guitar has EMG pick-ups
#2
That is meant for ground loop noise, which I really doubt is what's causing your problem.
You may be running your gain too high or standing too close to the amp.
#5
Why does everybody jump straight to the noise gate solution? That's not going to affect feedback while actually playing in any way whatsoever.

Acoustics of the room are what you need to address first. Try hanging drapes on at least two adjacent walls. The heavier the drapes the better. Carpet will also work. One thing that works well are the packing trays in crates of apples. They are similar to the old egg carton trick but come in much larger sheets, anybody that's ever done an egg carton wall will understand the advantage of that.
Angle your amps slightly so the speakers aren't pointing directly at a wall, especially if you have no curtains or other deadening on the opposing wall. Try to eliminate right angles.
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Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
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Cathbard Amplification
My band
#6
Quote by Cathbard
Why does everybody jump straight to the noise gate solution? That's not going to affect feedback while actually playing in any way whatsoever.

Acoustics of the room are what you need to address first. Try hanging drapes on at least two adjacent walls. The heavier the drapes the better. Carpet will also work. One thing that works well are the packing trays in crates of apples. They are similar to the old egg carton trick but come in much larger sheets, anybody that's ever done an egg carton wall will understand the advantage of that.
Angle your amps slightly so the speakers aren't pointing directly at a wall, especially if you have no curtains or other deadening on the opposing wall. Try to eliminate right angles.


We used used mattresses on the walls. Great for dampening sound and drunkenly stumbling into...You can usually pick them up at goodwill for fairly cheap...
#7
Quote by Cathbard
Why does everybody jump straight to the noise gate solution? That's not going to affect feedback while actually playing in any way whatsoever.

Acoustics of the room are what you need to address first. Try hanging drapes on at least two adjacent walls. The heavier the drapes the better. Carpet will also work. One thing that works well are the packing trays in crates of apples. They are similar to the old egg carton trick but come in much larger sheets, anybody that's ever done an egg carton wall will understand the advantage of that.
Angle your amps slightly so the speakers aren't pointing directly at a wall, especially if you have no curtains or other deadening on the opposing wall. Try to eliminate right angles.


No one went straight to noise gates. I was the third person Seriously though, it makes sense... MG amps + EMG pickups + the fact that TS went straight for a something that cancels noise but didn't know that it was for noise caused by bad grounding = simplest solution ie: noise gates
#8
I agree with cathbard, but I kinda don't. haha. I agree with all his solutions, but I had uncontrollable feedback through my amp and I got an ISP Decimator and now I don't have uncontrollable feedback.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#9
Quote by leejr429
...my amp is a Marshall MG Series 50 DFX...guitar has EMG pick-ups...

I think I found the problem.
#10
Practicing in a small room? High gain amps, high gain pickups. Probably standing right next to your amp right? With a 4x 12 that puts one or two speakers right next to your guitar.

Does the pitch of the feedback change as you turn your guitar? If so it is probably magnetic feedback. That is, the coils in your speakers feeding directly into your pickups. No acoustics involved. The device you mentioned won't help with that because it will only cut out noise from the power supply. Probably a noise gate won't help either because as soon as the feedback starts the noise gat wont cut off the signal.

The best solution is to stand further away from your amp. Standing next to someone else's is fine. So plug in your amp and then every one (other than the drummer) take to steps to the right.