#1
I'm trying to figure a song out by ear to help train myself but I'm struggling on the chorus.

The verse is E-Emaj7-D

The chorus is a A-Cadd9-C11-E

I originalyl thought this song may have been in A because the leads fit so well over the A major scale but idk!!! Maybe this is in one of those other scales like lydian or something.
#2
your going to have to use different scales for some of the chords. say for your first chords, you have three notes right beside each other, that doesn't appear in a scale other than the blues scale (which i wouldn't use here). and with the second one, you've got C# in the A major chord (the third) bu then you also have a C natural after that in both C chords and then presumably you'd move back to a C# over the E major again to not have the lower 6th.

basically one scale doesn't fit all here because there's chords from a modal interchange. i'd have to hear how the first one is played, but for the second one try A major scale over first chord, A minor pentatonic over second one, C major over third one, and A major for the last chord. hope that helps!

edit: you could try throw in a D# going to E (V-I) when your going back into the verse, so have the chord with D# (probably B7) as the last chord of the chorus and then E as the first of the verse.
Last edited by gavk at May 29, 2011,
#4
As you are starting and ending on E maj, I'm opting for the key of E maj as you are unconsciously resolving it there. Only YOU can tell us where it resolves, I'm just inferring it from your chord structure.

If it is in the key of E maj the D and C chords are borrowed from the parallel minor, so you will have to accommodate for accidentals over these chords.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Quote by AlanHB
As you are starting and ending on E maj, I'm opting for the key of E maj as you are unconsciously resolving it there. Only YOU can tell us where it resolves, I'm just inferring it from your chord structure.

If it is in the key of E maj the D and C chords are borrowed from the parallel minor, so you will have to accommodate for accidentals over these chords.


The song ends on E major aka E. What's throwing me off in my young understanding of music is why theres a Cadd9 to a C11. Generally E major has a C#m, no? I'm really trying to branch out and understand chord substitutions but that's a speed bump in being self taught as opposed to having a teacher to ask. :-(
#6
Quote by FlexEXP
The song ends on E major aka E. What's throwing me off in my young understanding of music is why theres a Cadd9 to a C11. Generally E major has a C#m, no? I'm really trying to branch out and understand chord substitutions but that's a speed bump in being self taught as opposed to having a teacher to ask. :-(


I stated that the C chords are borrowed from the parallel minor (ie. E minor). Just because a song is in a key doesn't mean that you are limited in what chords and notes are used in it, it's merely where the song resolves to.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by AlanHB
I stated that the C chords are borrowed from the parallel minor (ie. E minor). Just because a song is in a key doesn't mean that you are limited in what chords and notes are used in it, it's merely where the song resolves to.


So technically in the case of the C chords in this chorus of the song i posted above, I can go to the parallel minor in this case Em and use any variety of C major (since it has a C)?
#8
Quote by FlexEXP
So technically in the case of the C chords in this chorus of the song i posted above, I can go to the parallel minor in this case Em and use any variety of C major (since it has a C)?


Yeah, you can borrow any type of C chord you want. You can borrow fully from the parallel minor (Em) and get Cmaj7, Cmaj9, Cmaj7#11, C6, etc. You could borrow the C from the parallel minor, then add extensions from the actual key (E). For example, Cmaj7#9, Caddb13 or Cmaj7#5. Hell, you can borrow any chord from any key if it makes sense--and sounds good--to you. Borrowing from parallel minor (or parallel major for minor keys) is just the most common and easiest method of chord borrowing.
#9
Quote by AlanHB
As you are starting and ending on E maj, I'm opting for the key of E maj as you are unconsciously resolving it there. Only YOU can tell us where it resolves, I'm just inferring it from your chord structure.

If it is in the key of E maj the D and C chords are borrowed from the parallel minor, so you will have to accommodate for accidentals over these chords.


i don't think so, look at that C11, play that and you hear the F as a flat 6 going to the 5th, Making E the dominant, i certainly wouldn't hear that as any type of Neapolitan.
#10
Quote by gavk
i don't think so, look at that C11, play that and you hear the F as a flat 6 going to the 5th, Making E the dominant, i certainly wouldn't hear that as any type of Neapolitan.


It could go either way depending on how it's played. As I stated above, only TS can say where it resolves to.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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