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#1
Hi guys,
i just realised that i sort of dislike playing guitar solos. Is that normal? I mean for a guitarist to dislike soloing. I like playing the rhythm guitar but when it comes to solos im all like "oh dude, noone wants to hear that. and if they do, theyre a bunch of ******s" What to do? Go on? Try to start to like it?
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#2
Maybe you picked the wrong solos, or maybe you picked the wrong instrument. If you don't like playing solos then just don't play them and stick to rhythm imo.
#3
Maybe you're insecure

Of course you don't have to play solos. For example, take a look at the PIXIES. No real soloing there, just plain riffs. But there's no harm in trying to learn to play solos.
#4
Quote by Cahir
Hi guys,
i just realised that i sort of dislike playing guitar solos. Is that normal? I mean for a guitarist to dislike soloing. I like playing the rhythm guitar but when it comes to solos im all like "oh dude, noone wants to hear that. and if they do, theyre a bunch of ******s" What to do? Go on? Try to start to like it?


It's pretty common I've found. I've done various tours with different bands and a lot of bands on the label we're under contract to and I've asked them their opinions on soloing, a lot of people feel this way and I'm also one who doesn't really like soloing unless I feel the song should need it which is like... 1/12 songs
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#5
There's no law that says you have to play solos - that's the whole point of a musical instrument, you can create whatever you want with it.
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#6
people in the band want a solo in each song (but theres another guy who plays them so its ok) but i really hate when someone says "learn this solo" or "play solo in this part". i just dont want to because i dont like it.

Thank you for being so supportive, i was beggining to think that theres something wrong with me
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#7
Yeah, I think the same way many times, there are just way too many "shredfests" of solos out there that doesn't do much else than to ruin the melodic flow of the song and are just there because every song "must" have a solo. This is true especially in metal/rock/(blues) and it's usually at that part of the song that I hit the "next song" button. There are some very tasteful solos out there that really enhances the song however...

It's pretty ironic actually that I am a lead guitarist..
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#8
I've found when people say "guitar solo", they're thinking something wanky and really technical or some pentatonics drenched in wah. That doesn't have to be the case. When I approach a solo, I try to avoid that approach. I've found many times that sitting back and getting a feel for a passage and trying to play a melody that fits the music is much more effective than wanking away.

If you're in a band with another guitarist who takes the first approach and just goes balls-to-the-wall crazy for his solos, it can be really effective if you take the latter approach and try to lay down a coherent melody instead. That creates a really interesting contrast and gives you a much more identifiable style.

If you don't like either approach to a solo, don't worry. I'm of the opinion that a solo is not necessary in every song. When I write music, I try to incorporate techniques that are normally considered "solo techniques" into my rhythm parts and coming up with coherent melodies using these techniques without going into a solo-guitar mindset, if that makes any sense.
#9
I know a number of folkie-type musicians who never played a single note in their careers. Strum, strum, strum. Works fine.
Many get by with nothing more complex than an occasional bass run or "lick".

Some folks just don't handle instrumental playing very well... That's why there are so many "lead" guitarists running around.
#10
I love rhythm playing and really don't like playing solos either (thought I was just the only one) I've tried learning lots and I do enjoy playing melodys but dare I say solos just bore me. I can hammer on and pull off which i still practice and make up my own licks as i think these are important techniques to learn as a guitarist. At the moment I'm working on more slide work but that's more for my rhythm work. I used to get so hung up on solos and should I be learning them etc but now I just play what I want and concentrate on becoming the best rhythm player I can be.

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#11
At most parties and musical gatherings I've been to, the hit of the party was always the guy/girl strumming chords and singing/trying to sing. I sometimes think that only other guitarists like to listen to guitar solos. Whatever the case, I like to play guitar solos.
#12
You don't have to play them, but it's kind of odd that you actually don't like them and think they shouldn't be in songs. Unless you feel that way just towards no substance shred solos. Solos can be great, simple or technical, I myself love all kinds of solos that have substance and feel. I think you should work on learning to write them and play them in your own style, because a lot of guitarists who say solos are unnecessary or they don't like them probably don't know how to play them or make their own, so they feel jealous/ insecure.

I can't play insanely fast yet, but I try to make lead style licks that coat over the entirety of the songs I write.

Just my opinion but I think most of the time, just strumming chords 100% of the time comes off as lazy. You can have great rhythm parts that are notey that sound very full, as opposed to just chugging power chords.
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#13
There's no such thing as laziness when you are playing to satisfy yourself and express emotion.
#14
A solo is just an overlying melody, think vocals but played on an instrument. They don't need to be 16th notes played at 200bpm or sweeps up and down the neck so fast your fingertips might rip off.
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#15
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.
#16
Quote by Cahir
people in the band want a solo in each song (but theres another guy who plays them so its ok) but i really hate when someone says "learn this solo" or "play solo in this part". i just dont want to because i dont like it.

Thank you for being so supportive, i was beggining to think that theres something wrong with me


if you're learning a cover then you should learn the solo, however you shouldn't play one in a song that you feel doesn't need one. I personally don't solo often, however sometimes I feel I need to or the song has to have one, but I feel like rhythm playing sounds much more pleasing than solos most of the time.
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#17
There's nothing wrong with liking rythm guitar over lead guitar.
Personally, I think the rythm guitarist, bassist and drummer make the song while the singer and the lead guitarist take the credit.
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#18
Quote by PsiGuy60
There's nothing wrong with liking rythm guitar over lead guitar.
Personally, I think the rythm guitarist, bassist and drummer make the song while the singer and the lead guitarist take the credit.

agreed
#19
Shredfests are kind of boring. However, if you can come up with a flowing melodic piece that fits in there, by all means, express it in the song. If not, play what you want.
#20
I love solos they're why I started playing guitar (Kirk Hammett's solos to be specific), but I can respect someone who feels differently about them. As long as it sounds good and goes well with the emotion of the song theres nothing wrong with some shredding either.
#21
Maybe you're not good enough at guitar to appreciate guitar solos? Is it because they're hard to play, and you just don't want to learn it?

You don't have to play guitar solos. Idk about you but instrumental solos are always the climax of any good song for me.
#22
Okay, I take it you are referring the word "solo" to "lead break"?

Playing a melody on a guitar does not have to always be a "solo". You can use a melody to contrast a vocal line, as a fill and to add extra texture to the song.

Also, as previously mentioned, alot of people think of a solo as a wankfest, when in reality they really don't have to be. It is the solos with meaning and feeling that people want to listen to, and ignoring lead playing altogether because you think people are only listening to a guitarist wanking with their whammy would limit your playing and musical ability.
#23
I dont mind other people playing soulful solos. I just dont like the shredfests (that drives me mad) and the ones i come up with
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#24
Quote by Cahir
Hi guys,
i just realised that i sort of dislike playing guitar solos. Is that normal? I mean for a guitarist to dislike soloing. I like playing the rhythm guitar but when it comes to solos im all like "oh dude, noone wants to hear that. and if they do, theyre a bunch of ******s" What to do? Go on? Try to start to like it?



Wintersun has a 9 minute song without solo and that song is absolutely phenomenal. So not every song needs one to sound good but sometimes they can portray extra emotion if it's not just a pentatonic run through or an absolute "OMG I R REALLY GUD" <Commence shred> kinda thing.

If it's a good solo it will enhance your song. If not, people will hit next like they have already said.
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#25
I started off only learning rhythm guitar, and it wasn't until later that I switched to learning solos and improvisational skills. Your tastes and goals will evolve along with your guitar playing.

*edit - I also find the level of distaste for "shred" solos in this thread somewhat amusing. Just because a solo is played quickly doesn't mean it doesn't have musicality. Take two of my favorite solos from Megadeth's Rust in Peace album: "Holy Wars" end solo & "Five Magics" middle solo. The solo for "Holy Wars" is the absolute climax of the song, played with sheer aggression specifically to elicit that emotion. The middle solo in "Five Magics" has a very unique flavor and it darkens the mood of the passage within the song. Both of these solos could be considered "shred" due to the level of technicality, but they both serve specific purposes within the context of the music.
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Last edited by Vecheka at May 31, 2011,
#26
Quote by Vecheka
*edit - I also find the level of distaste for "shred" solos in this thread somewhat amusing. Just because a solo is played quickly doesn't mean it doesn't have musicality. Take two of my favorite solos from Megadeth's Rust in Peace album: "Holy Wars" end solo & "Five Magics" middle solo. The solo for "Holy Wars" is the absolute climax of the song, played with sheer aggression specifically to elicit that emotion. The middle solo in "Five Magics" has a very unique flavor and it darkens the mood of the passage within the song. Both of these solos could be considered "shred" due to the level of technicality, but they both serve specific purposes within the context of the music.

It's not so much that people here dislike fast solos and technical leads. It's just that there is a very obvious tendency for people to think that there is a dichotomy of speed or feel. Marty Friedman is a good example of someone who ignores that false dichotomy and just plays whatever needs to be there. Another is Paul Waggoner. Both players put the song first and make the song qualitatively better for the solo, not just wank whatever which way they want.

But then you have guys like Rusty Cooley and MAB who seem to more often than not ignore the concept of melody and just play scales and arpeggios really fast without any apparent musical context. Their style of playing is perfectly fine, but it lacks meaning. The notes used are discarded as fast as they appear and don't really seem to make any kind of impact. With Friedman and Waggoner, there is a sense that what is played is meant to be there and no note is misplaced. With guys like Cooley and MAB, the solo is there to show off just how fast the guy can play, not what kind of flavor he can add to the song.
#27
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#28
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It's not so much that people here dislike fast solos and technical leads. It's just that there is a very obvious tendency for people to think that there is a dichotomy of speed or feel. Marty Friedman is a good example of someone who ignores that false dichotomy and just plays whatever needs to be there. Another is Paul Waggoner. Both players put the song first and make the song qualitatively better for the solo, not just wank whatever which way they want.

But then you have guys like Rusty Cooley and MAB who seem to more often than not ignore the concept of melody and just play scales and arpeggios really fast without any apparent musical context. Their style of playing is perfectly fine, but it lacks meaning. The notes used are discarded as fast as they appear and don't really seem to make any kind of impact. With Friedman and Waggoner, there is a sense that what is played is meant to be there and no note is misplaced. With guys like Cooley and MAB, the solo is there to show off just how fast the guy can play, not what kind of flavor he can add to the song.

Point well taken, but that's also why I find the "anti-solo" sentiment a bit intriguing. Sure, there are players that are simply out to prove how fast they can play, but there are plenty who utilize speed tastefully as well. The former is no reason to avoid solos entirely.
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#29
No, but some people just don't like solos. I personally don't believe that every song needs to have one. More often than not, I'd rather hear an interesting instrumental passage that isn't dominated by one instrument. But then, I'm a fan of big arrangements and large harmonies.
#30
Quote by Bryc3e
Wintersun has a 9 minute song without solo and that song is absolutely phenomenal.


A lot of songs don't have (guitar) solo's and still sound phenomenal. Why always the <insert obscure metal band here> mentioning?
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#31
Probably because he was saying it's a 9 minute song that remains interesting rather than some 4 minute song by another band.
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#32
Beethoven's Fifth is over 20 minutes long and it stays interesting without a solo. Most music before blues came around didn't have a solo or anything. They're unnecessary, but they can be good.
#33
I do like solos as long as they fit the song and enhance it but yeah i dont think there always neccersery.

im learning to play lead properly with my teacher. im still on blues stuff atm and memorizing the notes and doing the scales n stuff but are there specific forumluas for figuring out solos. i mean its cool just playing what u feel if it fits n stuff but is there theory and techniques for getting a more enhanced feel for how a solo should be? or does it just come with theory and practical knowledge ect ect not even sure if im ready for that question or answer just yet but im very interested to know.

not sure if im just being an idiot there lol
#34
Quote by asmileyfish
I do like solos as long as they fit the song and enhance it but yeah i dont think there always neccersery.

im learning to play lead properly with my teacher. im still on blues stuff atm and memorizing the notes and doing the scales n stuff but are there specific forumluas for figuring out solos. i mean its cool just playing what u feel if it fits n stuff but is there theory and techniques for getting a more enhanced feel for how a solo should be? or does it just come with theory and practical knowledge ect ect not even sure if im ready for that question or answer just yet but im very interested to know.

not sure if im just being an idiot there lol


It's all about context and style. Theory will tell you a certain note or run will sound a certain way but only you can tell if that's how you want your solo to sound. No rules, no "this must go here or you will sound crap", just the sound you hear in your head.

Realistically it comes with knowledge and practice but really it's still a matter of context and personal style more than anything else.
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#35
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
It's all about context and style. Theory will tell you a certain note or run will sound a certain way but only you can tell if that's how you want your solo to sound. No rules, no "this must go here or you will sound crap", just the sound you hear in your head.

Realistically it comes with knowledge and practice but really it's still a matter of context and personal style more than anything else.



Nice thanks for answering that. puts my mind at rest a bit....better go practise lol
#36
Quote by PsiGuy60
There's nothing wrong with liking rythm guitar over lead guitar.
Personally, I think the rythm guitarist, bassist and drummer make the song while the singer and the lead guitarist take the credit.

#37
Everyone plays solos, it's almost impossible to find a good riff guy.

Yet, you should be able to play solos, since it shows that you understand the music and know where each note fits.
#38
Meh, i'm probably a bit late for this discussion but whatever.

We've all been there, pissed off because we don't feel that good as a guitar player, you will eventually grow out of it, trust me.
Solos can enhance a song or make it boring, all it comes down to is Context.
All types of soloing can sound good, it just needs a meaning and purpose.

The solo in this song really captures the fast and energetic meaning of the song, imo the song wouldn't be as good without it:
Descendent - Merican
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLkRxVYdUko

A 'technical' solo or "shred" to some doesn't need to be boring, for example:
Bad Brains - Sailin' On
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SIkoGIQuww

The guitarist plays fast but gets it over with quickly, he doesn't wank for ages.
Shredding can be good just as long as it compliments the song, the above song wouldn't be the same without that solo, it really conveys an agressive feel which fits the song.

Now this 'solo' is so painfully easy but it fits the song really well:
Ramones - I Wanna Be Sedated
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQeo3OfuEDM

What i'm trying to get across is, any type of solo can sound good and it helps to learn the different angles you can take when it comes to lead playing.
When it comes for writing original compositions you don't want to play the same type of solo all the time (or not playing one at all), thats not only boring for you but for the listener as well.

Thats my fill.
#39
Quote by SumFX
Now this 'solo' is so painfully easy but it fits the song really well:
Ramones - I Wanna Be Sedated
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQeo3OfuEDM


Thanks for bringing back memories. However, I'm not too sure on whether that can be qualified as a 'solo'. Then again, when can something be? A bit dubious..
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#40
I think it's best when a solo is truly a part of the song, and doesn't sound like a lead break thrown over some chords. Like Sweet Child o Mine or Nov. Rain, it wouldn't be anywhere near as good a song without the solos.
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