#1
I've been playing guitar for about a year and a half. I've been playing various subgeneres of metal for about 1 year. My favorite bands at the moment are August Burns Red, A Plea For Purging, Basically Metalcore in general. (Just to clear it up I'm not only into christian metal, those are just the first two bands that came to mind) I can play a about the first 2 minutes of Composure by August Burns Red sufficiently to get you in the ballpark of my skill level.

My problem is: I just joined a band, We're going to start having regular practices in about a month and the lead singer is my friend and basically railroaded me into playing lead. he says he knows I can do it, but I think he is overestimating my abilities. I feel like I'm in a bit over my head and I really struggle with writing melodic lead riffs. I've been working with minor scales up and down the neck, but my mind goes blank when I try to play something new. My friend has a slightly different tastein music than I do, and he founded this project so I'm going with his vision, He wants this band to sound along the lines of We Came As Romans, Abandon All Ships, and Woe, Is me.
I really don't want to dissapoint him and I'd really like to be a part of this band, so I'm looking for exercises, tips, general advice for playing Lead guitar in an I See Stars-ish kind of band.
#2
work on your music theory, knowing at least the key of the song you are playing in will allow you to decide what scales and modes to use when playing lead parts.

learn the major scale, and the natural minor in different keys. This will be your basis for any kind of music. Learn the shapes and where each of the notes are, knowing the fretboard will be your best friend and will allow you to move lead ideas around depending on key and tonality.

understand arpeggios (the notes of chords played singularly) . a lot of those bands you listed use pretty basic, repetitive arpeggios for lead lines. If you understand basic shapes to play over top of the chords in the progression that you need to play your lead lines over your job will be a million times easier because you will always have an out if you cannot think of something else to play in that position.. Many outstanding musicians do it, you're allowed to to, just dont get carried away..

hope this helps dude, feel free to check out this link, it will help you learn a lot of what i mentioned above should you decide to take my advice

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/
#3
Quote by Zeppelin Addict
work on your music theory, knowing at least the key of the song you are playing in will allow you to decide what scales and modes to use when playing lead parts.

learn the major scale, and the natural minor in different keys. This will be your basis for any kind of music. Learn the shapes and where each of the notes are, knowing the fretboard will be your best friend and will allow you to move lead ideas around depending on key and tonality.

understand arpeggios (the notes of chords played singularly) . a lot of those bands you listed use pretty basic, repetitive arpeggios for lead lines. If you understand basic shapes to play over top of the chords in the progression that you need to play your lead lines over your job will be a million times easier because you will always have an out if you cannot think of something else to play in that position.. Many outstanding musicians do it, you're allowed to to, just dont get carried away..

hope this helps dude, feel free to check out this link, it will help you learn a lot of what i mentioned above should you decide to take my advice

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/

Thanks Man. That sounds pretty solid. Theory should be a little easier with 8 years of piano lessons under my belt.
#4
Quote by TyraBanks777
I've been playing guitar for about a year and a half. I've been playing various subgeneres of metal for about 1 year. My favorite bands at the moment are August Burns Red, A Plea For Purging, Basically Metalcore in general. (Just to clear it up I'm not only into christian metal, those are just the first two bands that came to mind) I can play a about the first 2 minutes of Composure by August Burns Red sufficiently to get you in the ballpark of my skill level.

My problem is: I just joined a band, We're going to start having regular practices in about a month and the lead singer is my friend and basically railroaded me into playing lead. he says he knows I can do it, but I think he is overestimating my abilities. I feel like I'm in a bit over my head and I really struggle with writing melodic lead riffs. I've been working with minor scales up and down the neck, but my mind goes blank when I try to play something new. My friend has a slightly different tastein music than I do, and he founded this project so I'm going with his vision, He wants this band to sound along the lines of We Came As Romans, Abandon All Ships, and Woe, Is me.
I really don't want to dissapoint him and I'd really like to be a part of this band, so I'm looking for exercises, tips, general advice for playing Lead guitar in an I See Stars-ish kind of band.

You mentioned a number of bands. Look at how the melodies in their music is composed and try to emulate that approach. Understand why specific notes were used in writing the melody and what intervals are commonly used for what effect.

That said, don't worry too much. If the band sounds one way and you sound another, as long as you can make it work, you'll be fine.
#5
Definitely keep in mind arrangement. All the scales in the world are caca if it is out of context in regards to the song. Things should flow and fit. Consult scale charts when in doubt, otherwise, play what you feel in the heat of the moment, and do try to record it so you can develop it from there. Just my advice, hope it helps, and good luck to ya.
#6
Quote by TyraBanks777
Thanks Man. That sounds pretty solid. Theory should be a little easier with 8 years of piano lessons under my belt.



You've definitely got an excellent start, glad I could be of assistance
#7
learn some solos you like, but dont just learn them from tab, learn at what they are actually doing and why they are doing it, why they chose those notes and why they sound the way thy do. Make sure you know what scales and keys they are working in and the relationship what they are playing has with the rhythm guitar.
#8
Music Theory is of course the starting point. If you're out of key/using the wrong scales and modes all hope is lost lol.

If you know theory, it's all about phrasing really. It's usually effective to use the main melody of the song as a basis for the solo. Don't just shred, try repeating the same little phrases throughout the solo and link them all together with flashy tapping licks, alternate picking etc.

Another thing you could do live (wouldn't do this on a CD or you could get sued lol)

Live, when I'm supposed to solo over a phrygian rhythm, I've occasionally used the main melody of the X-Men theme as a basis for improvisation. Some people have even used the hall of the mountain king or other classical song melodies as starting points for their solos. Reason being is your audience will have a sense of familiarity with your solo because they recognize a little lick within it. Which sort of ties in with my previous statement about using repeated ideas.