#1
I've been playing for 1 year & 2 months. I started on acoustic and am now playing on an electric. Right now I'm trying to learn more theory. I know a a few scales, a few arpeggios, and some chords.

Apart from learning some songs I'm also starting to write my own stuff for fun. So far I've only come up with a small guitar part and some short tapping sequence.

My favorite band is Avenged Sevenfold. You can kind of call them my main influence. I also listen to a lot of metalcore, deathcore, and death metal.

Considering how long I've been playing and what I know, should I focus on writing riffs or try writing full songs?
Last edited by Chimara at May 30, 2011,
#4
Quote by zach in black
well do you want to write just riffs, or full songs. I would think a full song would feel more fulfilling when it's done even if it takes a while, but whatever floats your boat, man.

I want to write full songs. The thing is that I would love to throw some cool solos in there but I have no idea how to write one, apart from mashing a ton of random notes together.
#5
well, get some form of cheap recording system and then record the riffs, and practice improvising over the riff you want your solo on and then see what happens from there. If you play long enough over it you'll find something you like for your solo.
#6
Quote by Chimara
I want to write full songs. The thing is that I would love to throw some cool solos in there but I have no idea how to write one, apart from mashing a ton of random notes together.


I watched a movie once about a guy who wanted to play jazz but didn't know where to start, so some wise old music teacher told him to play a simple melody - I think it was something like "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" - and to keep playing it over and over and over and over and over until he couldn't just play it, he truly "got it" and could throw in extra notes wherever he felt like adding them without even thinking about it.

That's one approach.

Then there's the Joe Satriani approach, which is to think of a bunch of words (that don't even need to be good or make sense - they're purely for the rhythm and inspiration and won't be on the finished song), then imagine how you'd say them or sing them, and try to play them on guitar.

There's a lot of different ways to go about it.

I learned to solo by recording 15-minute blues/rock'n'roll rhythm-guitar-only "songs" and then practicing my scales along to them.

As I got better at it, I expanded the base of songs I'd practice along to, to include more "interesting" chord sequences.
#7
from experience, it takes a long time before you can actually write a song that flows properly and doesn't feel disjointed, and even longer before you write one that isn't crap. Not trying to be mean it's just the way it usually is.

I'd start trying to write really cool riffs, and when you come up with a heap, start trying to put them together into a song. A good way to write solos is to already have a main melody line in the song, it could be a guitar or keyboard part, or the vocal line, and then in the solo use that melody but build on it and expand on it in some way. Of course you don't want to do that for every song, just ones with particularly strong or memorable melodies
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#8
Quote by retrocausality
I watched a movie once about a guy who wanted to play jazz but didn't know where to start, so some wise old music teacher told him to play a simple melody - I think it was something like "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" - and to keep playing it over and over and over and over and over until he couldn't just play it, he truly "got it" and could throw in extra notes wherever he felt like adding them without even thinking about it.


Embarrasingly, it seems it was this...

Young_Indiana_Jones_and_the_Mystery_of_the_Blues
#9
songs and riffs dude. Either start with a riff, or a chord progression, and then build up the song around it. A song can be just 3 or 4 chords, with or without a riff. But if you write a riff you want to use in a song, be sure that the rest of the song is in the same key. It will take a while to write a song though, so be patient.
...That's what she said?...
#10
Quote by beno21
songs and riffs dude. Either start with a riff, or a chord progression, and then build up the song around it. A song can be just 3 or 4 chords, with or without a riff. But if you write a riff you want to use in a song, be sure that the rest of the song is in the same key. It will take a while to write a song though, so be patient.


eh?