#1
Hey cats and kittens,

I'm attempting to learn relative pitch to further my playing. I found an interval recognition trainer through musictheory.net. It lets you select as many or few intervals as you would like. My question is simple: where should I start? For those of you who have been successful with this sort of regimen, did you find it better to start with a few diatonic intervals then slowly expand the selection OR to just attempt all 12 intervals right from the start?

It'll be hard to work this into my already busy schedule, but I'll give it a shot. I figure if I can only make it happen 2-3 nights a week, that'll still be enough to progress over the coming weeks/months. I'm also going to start transcribing easy songs. I've done a couple with varying results, but I've still got a large collection of punk music to work on.
#2
i didn't train interval recognition like that, but it would probably make sense to start small and work your way up. i bet you could recognize a half step more easily than a minor sixth. keep trying to learn songs by ear though.
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#3
Do you know how to 'identify' intervals? Like associating them with songs? If no, check this out: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/AU-000-AuralTraining.php

IMO, I would do interval recognition traning (maybe 10 minutes a day) and working out songs by ear.
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#4
start with the amount of intervals that is easy and work your way up. you can add more intervalls until it becomes too hard and then just remove a few. id recommend starting with the smaller interval groups (seconds, thirds) to later try fourths and fifths only and then combining all of them(seconds-fifths) before moving on to sixths and sevenths
#5
i'd just go for all twelve notes from a root, then move up to harder intervals like diminished thirds/fourths etc. don't worry too much about it, it comes with time.
#6
Quote by 007dude
Do you know how to 'identify' intervals? Like associating them with songs?


Yes, I'm currently trying to work on a list that come from songs that are meaningful to me. Good suggestion.

I see we're getting a lot of differing opinions here; who among you have actually studied intervals in this method?
#7
Quote by soviet_ska
Yes, I'm currently trying to work on a list that come from songs that are meaningful to me. Good suggestion.

I see we're getting a lot of differing opinions here; who among you have actually studied intervals in this method?


I used this site: http://www.justinguitar.com/eartrainer/

It's in levels; to get to the next level, you have to score 90%.

Levels 1 to 5 are only ascending intervals (going up).
Levels 6 to 10 conatin ascending and descending intervals (up and down).


Level 1 & 6: Unison, Perfect 4, Perfect 5.
Level 2 & 7 adds: Maj 2, Maj 3.
Level 3 &8 adds: Maj 6, Maj 7, Octave (all diatonic intervals)
Level 4 & 9 adds: min 2, min 3
Level 5 & 10 adds: min 6, min 7, Aug 4 (all chromatic intervals within the octave)

I did 10 minutes a day, but I stopped a while ago because I got lazy. I'm hoping to carry on doing this once my exams are over. Next Monday
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
#8
I think people use the terms relative and perfect pitch too much. Your ear skills will get better with playing guitar over time, I guess these websites and exercise could aid you slightly but I'm pretty sceptical of their applications. And I did use these things myself a while ago, so I'm not meaning to put them down.
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#9
Quote by Venice King
I think people use the terms relative and perfect pitch too much. Your ear skills will get better with playing guitar over time, I guess these websites and exercise could aid you slightly but I'm pretty sceptical of their applications. And I did use these things myself a while ago, so I'm not meaning to put them down.



Relative pitch can be learned, or at least strengthened, perfect pitch cannot. While those sites won't make you a master transcriber, it will help distinguish two notes much more easily.
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
#10
Quote by 007dude
I used this site: http://www.justinguitar.com/eartrainer/

[...]

I did 10 minutes a day, but I stopped a while ago because I got lazy. I'm hoping to carry on doing this once my exams are over. Next Monday


Did you notice positive results from this method? Before you stopped, of course.

Quote by Venice King
I think people use the terms relative and perfect pitch too much. Your ear skills will get better with playing guitar over time


I know what you're talking about. I know several people who have played an instrument in the ballpark of 7-13 years, and they have great ears. I'm not a passive guy: I'm not going to sit around and wait on a skill to just 'happen' if I can help it. Knowing exactly what you are hearing is a musician's most useful skill; I'll be darn-diddilied if I don't want to groom it right away.
#11
Quote by soviet_ska
Did you notice positive results from this method? Before you stopped, of course.


I'm not sure, I definitely got better at recognising intervals.

I don't know how much it has helped me transcribe songs though. People say it helps, but since I transcribe a lot, it could have been that which helped instead of the intervals. I would still recommend interval traning though, a lot of music colleges have classes dedicated to them, so it's got to work, right?
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
#12
Quote by 007dude
Relative pitch can be learned, or at least strengthened, perfect pitch cannot. While those sites won't make you a master transcriber, it will help distinguish two notes much more easily.

See, this is what is often said - perfect pitch cannot be learnt or strengthened. But people can learn how to identify chords or notes. If a note is played on it's own, 9/10 I can get it right, and I'm sure many people on this forum alone can and probably better too. That isn't relative pitch. I know it's not perfect pitch either. I just don't like the terms.

And to TS, good to see you have a good attitude, best of luck
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Last edited by Venice King at May 30, 2011,
#13
Quote by 007dude
Relative pitch can be learned, or at least strengthened, perfect pitch cannot. While those sites won't make you a master transcriber, it will help distinguish two notes much more easily.

I've actually heard a few claims that perfect pitch can be learned through hearing the "color" of each note... A more accepted idea is that you can learn perfect pitch, but only when you're around the age of three.

But uh, back to the lecture at hand...

Quote by 007dude
I'm not sure, I definitely got better at recognising intervals.
I don't know how much it has helped me transcribe songs though. People say it helps, but since I transcribe a lot, it could have been that which helped instead of the intervals

I'll keep that in mind. You're right: ultimately, transcription is what is going to make me better at transcription.

Quote by Venice King
And to TS, good to see you have a good attitude, best of luck.


Thanks, I figure it won't hurt me (or be a waste of time), 'cause, hey, let's face it: my ear is a mega-liability right now.
#14
interval ear trainers dont really work for me. i learn music by ear and it works great. pick easy single note melodies and learn them.

play the song hear the first note pause the song and find it. do it over and over theres tons of great songs to do this with.

your ear will get better with time anyway but transcribe is a very effective way to get great at your own solos
#15
I couldn't get the sound on the JustinGuitar trainer to work, but I took the same idea and put it into the musictheory.net trainer. Did pretty well on the 4ths/5ths and about 80% on the second level. Also, I just finished transcribing the Sex Pistols' "Pretty Vacant". Whoo, powerchords!
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#16
Personally I think that just trying to play songs (or whatever you hear in your head) works much better for training your ear than interval trainers and yes, I have spent some time with them, but I didn't really see much progress.
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#17
I agree with learning things by ear rather than using an online ear trainer. Next time you're sitting with your guitar with the TV on in the background pick melodies out that you hear and figure them out by ear (I find this works very well with adverts/comercials and music channels). Over time you learn to pick things up very quickly.
Only downside is that it's almost always going to be diatonic but once you can recognize the diatonic intervals by ear the rest is quite easy to pick up.

For some reason I find the timbre is quite important to me - im pretty good with actual instruments however MIDI beeps don't resonate so well with my ears for some reason (probably my issue but im guessing it could work in reverse and you could work the beeps out quicker than say, a stringed instrument, for example)
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#18
Quote by soviet_ska
Hey cats and kittens,

I'm attempting to learn relative pitch to further my playing. I found an interval recognition trainer through musictheory.net. It lets you select as many or few intervals as you would like. My question is simple: where should I start? For those of you who have been successful with this sort of regimen, did you find it better to start with a few diatonic intervals then slowly expand the selection OR to just attempt all 12 intervals right from the start?

It'll be hard to work this into my already busy schedule, but I'll give it a shot. I figure if I can only make it happen 2-3 nights a week, that'll still be enough to progress over the coming weeks/months. I'm also going to start transcribing easy songs. I've done a couple with varying results, but I've still got a large collection of punk music to work on.


start with writing down and playing the notes to simple children's songs. christmas songs, lullabys, hymns, jingles..it's all a good way to get you started with ear training because most of those tunes don't modulate and most of the movement is by step or thirds, maybe fourths. keep doing that until you can do it in your head, then start with chords and more difficult tunes.
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