#1
So im still pretty new to theory.

I learnt that the Major scale is notes that are w w h w w w h right? So a C major scale would be:

C D E F G A B C (basically all the 'whole' notes).
From that, I worked out that the pattern for it would be

-------------------------------------------5-7-8---------------------
----------------------------------5-6-8-----------------------------
----------------------------5-7-------------------------------------
---------------------5-7-------------------------------------------
------------5-7-8-------------------------------------------------
--5-7-8-----------------------------------------------------------


So basically I can just 'randomly' hit any note from those and I would be playing in C major?


Also,
What backing chords would fit here? How do scales relate to chords? I assume playing the Cmajor chord would work here, but other chords work as well?


Thanks.
I see you're not using the UG black theme



Originally posted by GOD
akm_202, i now announce you, king of awesome. You may bow down to me.
#2
Well, without making things much more complicated than they need to be, that's not really a C major scale because it starts on an A. C major scales go from C to C. But yes, all of those notes are in C major.
There's quite a few good articles in the lessons section on UG that taught me this kind of stuff a while back, so I don't really want to spend ages explaining everything in detail, but, basically?
Chords in a key (say, C major) relate to the scale (in this case, chords in the key of C major are made from the C major scale). Basic chords are made up of three notes (they're called triads when they're three note chords), and the notes are a root, a third above it, and a third above that (which could also be described as a fifth above the root).
In practice, let's say we want to build a C chord from the C major scale. We'd take the root note, C, and find the note two notes above it (a third) and four notes above it (a fifth):
C D E F G A B C
We take the C, the E, and the G to make a C triad, which in this case is a major triad. We can do this for all the notes in the scale, so a D triad would be D F and A, which makes a D minor chord.
To save you the hassle of doing it to every note, the major chords are C F and G, the minor chords are D E and A, and the B is a diminished chord.
In general terms, for any scale, the first (I), fourth (IV), and fifth (V) notes make major chords, the others make minor (ii, iii, and vi: second, third, and sixth) and diminished chords (vii - seventh).

TL;DR: C, F, G, Dm, Em, Am, and Bdim will all work as backing chords.
#3
To the OP, you pretty much hit the nail on the head. That particular scale shape is usually used for the relative minor key (in this case, A) but as long as you make "C" the tonal center of your music, then yes, what you said is correct. I did notice that you were missing a note in your tab, however. On the G string, you can also add the fourth fret (B).

As for chords, here's a little trick for figuring out which chords to use in a major key. Take the notes of your scale in order (in this case, CDEFGAB) and apply this pattern to it:

Major
minor
minor
Major
Major
minor
diminished

So in other words:
C maj
d min
e min
F maj
G maj
a min
b dim

Those are the basic chords you can use in your major key.

On common way to see this Major/minor pattern written is with Roman Numerals. If the numerals are capital, it's a major chord. If they are lower case, it's a minor chord. Lowercase with a circle next to it is diminished. So the pattern goes:
I ii iii IV V vi vii°

Apply that to your scale and you have:
C maj (I)
d min (ii)
e min (iii)
F maj (IV)
G maj (V)
a min (vi)
b dim (vii°

If you memorize that pattern and know your scales, you figure out keys really quickly and can jam along with other people without any problems. Keep in mind, though, that this is mainly for major keys and ionian mode. Use minor keys or a different mode and it changes a little.

I hope this helped!
#4
The shape's irrelevant - it's still C major.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
Ah thanks!!! You guys have been really helpful!

So the whole 1st, 3rd and 4th note making a major chord works with all the major scales yeah?

So a D major scale would be:
D E F G A B C yeah?
So a the chords that can be used are:
D, F & G
Em, Am, Bm,
C dim

...Whats the main difference between distinguishing a Dmajor scale from an Cmajor scale? They have the same notes...Is it just how you start off the 'song'? With the root note? (In this case D)
I see you're not using the UG black theme



Originally posted by GOD
akm_202, i now announce you, king of awesome. You may bow down to me.
#6
Quote by akm_202
Ah thanks!!! You guys have been really helpful!

So the whole 1st, 3rd and 4th note making a major chord works with all the major scales yeah?

So a D major scale would be:
D E F G A B C yeah?
So a the chords that can be used are:
D, F & G
Em, Am, Bm,
C dim

...Whats the main difference between distinguishing a Dmajor scale from an Cmajor scale? They have the same notes...Is it just how you start off the 'song'? With the root note? (In this case D)


No no no,,

D major is D E F# G A B C# D

Read up on the cycle of 5ths!


Remember W W H W W W H -- start on any note play that pattern -- that is a major scale. Every major scale has some number of flats or sharps (C Major has neither).

As you go around this:



You see that G major has a note that is not in C major, F#. F has a note that is not in C major, Bb. etc.

The important thing is the pattern of W W H W W W H.

You might want to take some time to learn what the staff and key signatures look like -- it is very hard to learn anything about music without learning some of the basics of standard notation.
#7
Ahh I think I get it.
So a Emajor scale would be:
Emajor scale

E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E
W-W--H--W-W-W--W

Correct?

And yeah, im still learning the basic notations, just having trouble remembering them.
I see you're not using the UG black theme



Originally posted by GOD
akm_202, i now announce you, king of awesome. You may bow down to me.
#8
Quote by akm_202
Ah thanks!!! You guys have been really helpful!

So the whole 1st, 3rd and 4th note making a major chord works with all the major scales yeah?

No, 1st 3rd and 5th.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#9
Quote by akm_202
Ahh I think I get it.
So a Emajor scale would be:
Emajor scale

E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E
W-W--H--W-W-W--W

Correct?

And yeah, im still learning the basic notations, just having trouble remembering them.

yup dont for get the half step from the 7 to the 1 again
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#10
Quote by akm_202
So the whole 1st, 3rd and 4th note making a major chord works with all the major scales yeah?


Actually, it's 1st, 3rd, and 5th. The first note is the root, it's how the chord gets it letter name. That middle note, your third, is what determines whether a chord is major or minor. The last note in that combo (that combo is called a "triad," by the way), your fifth, is almost always a perfect fifth above the root. If it changes, that makes a chord diminished (or, rarely, augmented).

As you add sharps and flats as you change keys, the distance between a notes in the triad changes. I'll give you an example. Let's say you're playing in the key of C major, and you want to play a D chord. Take a look at the scale, and notice that your chord will have these notes:

C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

That means the notes in the D chord are D, F, and A, making it a D minor chord. Now let's do the same thing, but in the key of G major instead of C major:

G-A-B-C-D-E-F# -G-A

Notice that in the key of G, we use F# instead of F? That means that a D chord in the key of G goes D-F#-A. Since that middle note is now a half step higher, that makes it a major third, meaning your D chord is now D major instead of D minor. Next time you get out your guitar, play those two chords. Notice how the difference between the D major chord and D minor chords is one fret?

If that's too confusing, don't worry about it yet. Don't try to absorb too much information at one time, you'll just get overwhelmed. Just work on the basics of scales.

Ahh I think I get it.
So a Emajor scale would be:
Emajor scale

E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E
W-W--H--W-W-W--W

Correct?


Yes! That last "W" should be an "H", but it's probably just a typo. Otherwise, yes, you're completely right. Now match that up with the Major-minor pattern from before, and you'll have your chords.

E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E
I---ii--iii--IV-V-vi--vii°--I

So your chords in the key of key major would be:
E Maj
f# min
g# min
A Maj
B Maj
c# min
d# dim