#1
I've been working on my singing, and I've got somewhat of a decent range now, but my voice just seems too tinny when I hear myself recorded. Anybody that knows what I mean, please help me out!!!
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#2
Usually a tinny sound means the recording quality is bad. Have someone who knows what they're doing help you get your mic set up correctly and all your settings right in Protools, or Garage Band, or whatever it is you are using. All those little things like "sample rates" actually make a big difference.
#3
Oh believe me, i've got the recording right, its just the actual tone of my voice that I need assistance with. Even at high recording quality I can't get the timbre of my voice to sound right.
That's a Bingo!!! Is that the way you say it? "Thats's a bingo?"

-Cols. Hans Landa AKA The Jew Hunter,
Inglourious Basterds
#5
maybe you're singing from your head and not your chest?
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#6
Quote by Kraig82
Oh believe me, i've got the recording right, its just the actual tone of my voice that I need assistance with. Even at high recording quality I can't get the timbre of my voice to sound right.
Even if you are recording at high resolution (24bit 192k) - the mic can make a big difference. A poor mic can result in a tinny sounding vocal.

But let's suppose you have a really good condensor mic. There's the room to consider. The room is very very important. If you're in your living room or bedroom for example the poor room acoustics can make the result sound "tinny" even if you have a good mic and are recording on a state of the art rig at the highest possible resolution.

But let's say all these things are ideal you have high quality recording on a beautiful mic in a state of the art vocal booth. If you are listening to an unprocessed recording and are comparing it to the vocals of your favourite crooners then you may want to add some EQ, compression, and reverb to give the recording warmth, depth, and punch.

Many singers will ask for reverb to be added to the monitored line they are listening to through their headphones during the recording process because the clean audio sounds "tinny" to them. People are very self conscious and critical about the sound of their own voice on recordings - even professional singers can feel that way.

Of course all those things won't fix a weak or tinny voice they merely enhance a good vocal. If it really is your voice then be sure to do vocal warmups and if you are serious about improving your voice then look at getting a vocal instructor/ singing coach.

If you want some good basic free exercises these are the best one's I've found:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5CWsFaVnWM - watch the whole "warm up" series (I think there are four vids) from this guy. He's quite a likable guy to listen to and knows his stuff. I think he has some lessons you can purchase but I'd get a live singing coach who can see you sing and tell you where you are going wrong.

Keep in mind that unless you are pretty loaded and have fitted out your house with a recording studio spent at least a few hundred dollars on a good condensor mic and tweaked your track with some EQ, reverb, and compression your recording is probably not "high quality".

Best way to find out if it is your voice or your room or your mic is to post a vid, or recording, explain the equipment you used and your basic room set up and keep the track clean.

Then ask for constructive feedback to help you improve your vocals. That would give people the opportunity to hear if there is some obvious error with your technique or a flaw in your recording set up.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at May 31, 2011,