#1
Hey everyone. Well, I've been playing for 4 or 5 years.. I'm ok I guess, but nowhere near where I believe is good. I'd like to start working towards being good in these terms:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8IeQZ89pWM
I'm talking about the solo, I can do the rhythm no problem, same thing with most fast rhythms. But I want to be a lead
The fluidity and the choosing of the progressions is amazing. Now, I watched the demos for them, and played along, slowly, with metronome, as always. How do i work to obtaining the ability to do this type of playing second nature? I practice everyday, working slow and going up, but I really never seem to get that much better. My music theory is weak, mainly for the reason I can't find someone to explain it. I've tried tens of teachers, I've tried books. It almost feels like what dyslexia would probably be. I sit down at night and study for ages, but it doesn't click. So far, the closest I've been able to work out for myself is to try to memorize the half steps of different scales, but putting it all together has been a nightmare. At the moment, I just look at the scale vertically on the E A D or e string and try to start my run from there. So, I would like to get my stuff together finally. If anyone has had a similar problem with an almost learning block, and can point me in the right direction, I would be appreciative. I know this type of thing doesn't come overnight, and I AM willing to put the time in, but, it won't do any good if I have no idea where to start. Tips, trade secrets, etc, more than willing to listen. Thanks in advance!
#2
god its nice hearing that someone is in the same boat as me. We should go fishing. Haha, but seriously. I feel you brother.
#3
Quote by Argos2010
god its nice hearing that someone is in the same boat as me. We should go fishing. Haha, but seriously. I feel you brother.


Haha, ya. I just hate feeling like I'm missing the easiness that can come from practicing the RIGHT stuff enough. It just all feels like if we were doing math, I'm dividing, when I need to be multiplying or something. Sure, it's math still, but it's WRONG math :P
#5
I think what you're asking is how to write a good solo? I had a similar problem years ago. The first step I took to solving it was to learn basic music theory. A lot of that, however, doesn't translate to metal progressions with power chords very well because power chords aren't really major or minor, they're kind of ambiguous, although I'm sure some music theory geek will tell me otherwise.

What worked for me was to become a pattern player by learning three note per string patterns and working them out over chord progressions. Most stuff, I found was in E, D, or A. So I set about learning all of the modal patterns for those keys and when it started to click, I found I could just move them up or down a few frets regardless of key.

An example of pattern playing can be found here:

http://www.guitar-tutorial.net/diatonic.html

The patterns are outlined in red at about the middle of the page. Learn them in sequence: Ionian (Major), Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolion (Minor), and Locrian. I worked at the Ionian and Dorian at first and saw how they tied together. Then moved on to Ionian,Dorian, Phrygian, to see how those patterns formed on the fretboard and so on until I had all of the patterns down.

The patterns stay the same regardless of key. You just move them up or down as needed by starting at the root note, or key that you're playing in. A good way to see that is to plug in each modal scale on this website:

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php

After learning the diatonic modes, you can move on to harmonic minor and other scale patterns.

Another tool useful for seeing these kinds of patterns is the Guitar Grimoire, which helped me before all of these internet sites were available.

After a few weeks of memorizing patterns and playing with a few power chord progressions, you'll start to feel it "click" and it becomes easy to play solos in key. The challenge then is to choose the right notes and phrases to make things interesting. And that takes practice. But learning the patterns and realizing that you can start from any note within those patterns and use any note in that pattern is how I gained the ability to do things like that.
Last edited by stoic at May 31, 2011,
#6
Quote by Pantherfreak
Hey everyone. Well, I've been playing for 4 or 5 years.. I'm ok I guess, but nowhere near where I believe is good. I'd like to start working towards being good in these terms:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8IeQZ89pWM
I'm talking about the solo, I can do the rhythm no problem, same thing with most fast rhythms. But I want to be a lead
The fluidity and the choosing of the progressions is amazing. Now, I watched the demos for them, and played along, slowly, with metronome, as always. How do i work to obtaining the ability to do this type of playing second nature? I practice everyday, working slow and going up, but I really never seem to get that much better. My music theory is weak, mainly for the reason I can't find someone to explain it. I've tried tens of teachers, I've tried books. It almost feels like what dyslexia would probably be. I sit down at night and study for ages, but it doesn't click. So far, the closest I've been able to work out for myself is to try to memorize the half steps of different scales, but putting it all together has been a nightmare. At the moment, I just look at the scale vertically on the E A D or e string and try to start my run from there. So, I would like to get my stuff together finally. If anyone has had a similar problem with an almost learning block, and can point me in the right direction, I would be appreciative. I know this type of thing doesn't come overnight, and I AM willing to put the time in, but, it won't do any good if I have no idea where to start. Tips, trade secrets, etc, more than willing to listen. Thanks in advance!


I've spent about a decade helping people in a situation similar to yours. I don't know if what we do is suited for your situation or not, but I at least wanted to make you aware of a possible option. I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have. My Guitar School is in my link. I've been here for about 1.5 years and 4000 posts helping others like you with their theory questions.

In reading your post, you don't strike me as having a learning block, but that the quality of available information isn't working. Been there done that. It took me 12 years ultimately, and I was always of a reasonably high IQ, so, this was really frustrating. Most sites and lessons do not teach and that's where they fall short. Merely conveying facts doesn't equate to teaching, and that's what I think ultimately leaves almost every book wanting. On the other hand, no book can teach if the person moves forward before they are ready. A book cannot control if you are being impatient (not you specifically, but in general any person) a book cannot determine that you skimmed through and wanted to just get through it finally. One thing that having an online school allows for is for people to be sure of what they've learned so they aren't getting lost at the next lesson. Also, it allows for several tangible opportunities to apply the lessons they've learned.

As for technique and such, it's a time based correct practice routine. Metronome practice, consistently, building and refining movements into a long term natural motiona are all key to it. It's a lot like growing a tree. How long does it take to grow? Answer: as long as it takes. If you drench the tree with water, versus regular watering, it's not going to cause it to spring forth any faster.

With your study habits as you described, I don't think it would take you long at all to realize serious progress. Its people with that kind of commitment to learn that really come into their own when studying with us.

Anyways, wanted to make you aware of one possible option. I can't say it's the right one for you, I'd want to talk to you in depth about what you know and what all you'd like to accomplish. By the way, I do offer a free mentoring service, and you are welcome to use that, just click the link in my sig, and I'll do my best to help.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at May 31, 2011,
#7
something that has really helped me out is playing my stupid little improve solos over a loop. eventually I would come up with something that I liked and kept. When I had several chunks, i put them together and poof! A decent little solo. I slowly began to incorporate the tricky techniques into my solos, but only one at a time. For example I would noodle and work on a little passage containing say, sweep picking. Then I would run the blues loop and play a little improv solo, throwing in the sweep that i was working on every once in a while. eventually this allowed me to use sweeps more effectively when playing solos.... Not perfect, but better. On to the next technique!

Give it a shot! there is a great website with a bazillion backing tracks on it that i have found helpful
guitarbackingtrack.com
Enjoy!