#1
Hi,

We're producing a documentary called "Musicwood" that focuses on the struggle between guitar-makers, musicians, environmentalists, and Native Alaskan loggers to save the acoustic guitar and the old-growth trees of Alaska’s Tongass rainforest.

We've just launched a campaign on Kickstarter to help raise enough funds to finish the film. http://kck.st/musicwoodthefilm

We thought it might be a project that is of interest to you, if it is, it would be great if you could help to spread the word. We really want to be able to finish the film so we can raise awareness of this issue and safeguard the future of the acoustic guitar.

If you can help in any way, we’d really appreciate it.

For more info:

Musicwood website
Musicwood on Kickstarter

Many thanks!
#2
i dont think the future of the acoustic guitar is in jeopardy, if anything it'll go the way of synthetic materials or something
#3
Try posting in the pit, you'll get a greater response there

This is more of a discussion thing for that section anyway i suppose. As for the argument about synthetics, for the cheap brands sure, but i can't see Taylor going plastic etc Not to mention the sacrifice of tone and so on.

Nothing compares to the natural wood, for acoustic guitar especially, the wood can have a huge impact on sound.
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#4
Seagull uses cedar and cherry -- is that a reasonable substitute that isn't threatened? Seagulls are highly regarded.
#5
Thanks so much for all the helpful comments, we will post it in The Pit.
Re Cherry wood and other materials, there has definitely been a move from the manufacturers to look into other woods etc. It can affect the tonal qualities however and consumers can be resistant to change. But I think what the manufacturers are keen to do is not leave a forest behind that has been overlogged and move onto something new
but maintain a relationship, build a sustainable supply source form this forest in the USA, and maintain a tradition that is centuries old. The Forest Stewardship certification of guitars does seem like a great answer.
#6
Yeh, i like the sound of it.

I mean i'm all for giving new woods a go, who knows, there could be better/unique sounding ones out there.
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#7
Quote by Spud Spudly
Seagull uses cedar and cherry -- is that a reasonable substitute that isn't threatened? Seagulls are highly regarded.

Martin also experimented with American cherry, trying if it could substitute mahogany. They have a model or two out with cherry b/s but idk how well they sell
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#8
Seems like a cool idea, but a rather moot one, at least in Europe and North America. Most developed nations have regulations regarding logging/deforestation. I also find the claim that "within 10 years the acoustic guitar as we know it will be extinct [sic]" dubious at best. And if that is the case I think there are greater priorities than guitars. Seems sketchy to me.
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#9
there are new, sustainable and recycled tonewoods being used for guitars - not always by the bigger companies, but by luthiers. woods like various sinker woods and ancient koa can be used, as can old growth deadfall. if supplies of certain woods grow scarce, they'll find options. bob taylor made a guitar out of pallets, and word has it it sounded fine. some luthiers buy large heavy furniture or even old farm house walls - the wood is already seasoned and aged after they saw away the outside parts.

one company made a guitar out of bamboo, which is the fastest growing plant, and koa and some other woods are being replanted and farmed to make sure there's more available and that the trees don't die out. jean larrivee owns his own tree farms where he plants and grows woods that he sells to other companies as well as using for larrivee guitars. james goodall owned part of a koa farm. there's replanting of forests going on by forest services, governments and environmentalists. heck, the boyscouts replant.

and then there's carbon fiber guitars that sound very good.

for that matter, some of the woods listed on the SITES treaty may not actually be scarce - seems like some might be there because of issues of how it is harvested and by whom.
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#10
While I see what the threadstarter is aiming at & applaud his/her zeal , I do not think this is the correct or indeed the approiate venue/vehicle for his/her personal save the planet whim for this year!! Sorry if it offends but I think this thread is so far off topic for this forum that it needs reporting.
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#11
Thanks for all that great info Patticake. We've been following and interviewing the major Guitar makers; Bob Taylor, Chris Martin, Dave Berryman, so it's really great to keep hearing about the other luthiers. We're not anti logging in anyway, it's just great to do it in a sustainable way. Guitars can be around for as long as some of the trees that go into them, can't think of a better way to go for a 250-600 yr old Spruce, than be put in a guitar.