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#1
ok, so lets get to the point without wasting time--

I'm looking for the most vicious, vile, barbarous metal bands in/around the
london area to record... for FREE!

FOR FREE?!?! How the f*ck is that possible, you ask.. well ...

Well, im an audio student in london, and as a part of my course im required
to record a band, which will later be submitted as a project for a grade and
blah blah blah...

I'm taking this a notch up and will be trying to record as many metal bands
as i possibly can during this period to make good use of the top quality recording
facilities provided.


Bands please send an email with the following details to
reinventingmetal@hotmail.com --

Band Name, Contact number and name, a link to where i can listen to your tracks.
#3
This is an excellent way for bands to get a free demo done, so I'd recommend this.

Bands probably won't get a commercial recording out of it, because there's usually some copyright shit because of the course involvement.

IMO, TS, if you're serious about being a sound engineer or whatever, you should be looking to record as many genres of music as you can, rather than exclusively one genre.
#4
Done!


not


EDIT: damn! ^

honestly, if i were around your area i would definitely do this.
Click here to hear my BOB DYLAN (Blowing in the Wind) out right now May 2k17
Last edited by laid-to-waste at May 31, 2011,
#5
Quote by BrianApocalypse
This is an excellent way for bands to get a free demo done, so I'd recommend this.

Bands probably won't get a commercial recording out of it, because there's usually some copyright shit because of the course involvement.

IMO, TS, if you're serious about being a sound engineer or whatever, you should be looking to record as many genres of music as you can, rather than exclusively one genre.


given my permission, bands are allowed to use the recordings for
commercial purposes as well, as I would be the owner of the
given recordings..
EDIT: all track rights will be transferred to the artists upon request.

and yeah no worries bro, thanks for the tip, i've already been recording
acoustic stuff, now its time to move on to the harder shit... plus anyways..
if you can conquer extreme metal recording and mixing, there's nothing you
cant mix
Last edited by R.I.M.S at Jun 5, 2011,
#6
^ WANTWANTWANTWANTWANT
but we doesn't have equipment ATM
[edit] or any recorded media , for that matter
Last edited by mr edevil45 at May 31, 2011,
#7
Might be interested, but we're in no way metal
I'm selling an ernie ball wah pedal. Buy my ernie ball wah pedal.
...
Wah pedal.

Quote by 23dannybhoy23
That's got to be my all time favourite online death threat

Quote by smokeysteve22


My chest hurts after that.
#8
Quote by R.I.M.S

if you can conquer extreme metal recording and mixing, there's nothing you
cant mix

LOL
#9
Quote by R.I.M.S
given my permission, bands are allowed to use the recordings for
commercial purposes as well, as I would be the owner of the
given recordings..

and yeah no worries bro, thanks for the tip, i've already been recording
acoustic stuff, now its time to move on to the harder shit... plus anyways..
if you can conquer extreme metal recording and mixing, there's nothing you
cant mix


dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#10
Quote by R.I.M.S

if you can conquer extreme metal recording and mixing, there's nothing you
cant mix



I wouldn't let you mix my music if you paid me.
#11
Are you doing A level or something? You think Metal is harder to mix than say, an Orchestra? This is coming from a Metal fan too.
#12
Quote by andyscoot
Are you doing A level or something? You think Metal is harder to mix than say, an Orchestra? This is coming from a Metal fan too.


Year 9 SATs by the way he's talking..
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#13
Quote by R.I.M.S
if you can conquer extreme metal recording and mixing, there's nothing you
cant mix

Right it's way easier to mix a genre that's purely driven by loudness and brute force with barely any respect for dynamics. Once you have that down, it's a piece of cake to mix orchestral music and jazz because you know that you don't have to worry about any of that stuff! Compress away!
#14
Quote by TheChaz
Right it's way easier to mix a genre that's purely driven by loudness and brute force with barely any respect for dynamics.


Depends on the band
#16
Jesus........


Quote by andyscoot
Are you doing A level or something? You think Metal is harder to mix than say, an Orchestra? This is coming from a Metal fan too.


I know right? Orchestral music has so much going on in so many frequencies it's really....dumb.....to say you can mix that after mixing ANYTHING. I wouldn't know where to start.
#17
to answer all questions..

1. college
2. an orchestra has various instrumentations and etc covering almost
every frequency in the audible range, to make a good orchestral mix,
you just have to set the eq's right as players in the orchestra set the
dynamic levels themselves while playing, not much work has to be done
there. in metal you have loud brain scrambling guitars, smashing drums
and a ****er doing either guttural vocals or screaming on top of his lungs,
in order to actually capture it, make everything in the mix stand out and still
keep the "essence" of the song... well, link me to an extreme metal band you've
recorded that actually sounds good, then we talk.
3. people who're posting comments showing disinterest well go waste your time
somewhere else, i honestly dont care, if you want to record then you're more
than welcome to come in for a couple of sessions.. if not, shut the f*ck up
dont go around bashing people's threads coz you have nothing better to do.
Last edited by R.I.M.S at Jun 5, 2011,
#18
Quote by mr edevil45
^ WANTWANTWANTWANTWANT
but we doesn't have equipment ATM
[edit] or any recorded media , for that matter


equipment hire is always an option.
#19
Quote by ChucklesMginty



...




unless you're actually paying me for the recording/ studio time,
they're legally under my name, nothing you can actually do about it.
now given the case that this is a free recording, there's literally
no way to get around it.
#20
Quote by maggot9779
Jesus........


I know right? Orchestral music has so much going on in so many frequencies it's really....dumb.....to say you can mix that after mixing ANYTHING. I wouldn't know where to start.


just coz you're one doesnt mean all sound engineer's are dumbasses.
if you know your shit, you can mix anything, anywhere, anytime and make it sound
good.
#21
Quote by R.I.M.S
unless you're actually paying me for the recording/ studio time,
they're legally under my name, nothing you can actually do about it.
now given the case that this is a free recording, there's literally
no way to get around it.

Isn't ownership of intellectual property the same as with physical property, in that you can also give it away?


Quote by R.I.M.S
just coz you're one doesnt mean all sound engineer's are dumbasses.
if you know your shit, you can mix anything, anywhere, anytime and make it sound
good.

No you can't. If you know your shit then you also know that your best results will always be with equipment, recording rooms, musicians and music styles you are most familiar with. No matter how good of an audio engineer you are, you cannot make up for bad equipment, bad performances or bad acoustics.

As an audio engineer, it's also your job to capture the performances in a way that fits the style. You're not going to mix a guitar in a pop song the same way you would in a ska or death metal song, and if you're working without a producer, chances are you're not going to hit the "vibe" of unfamiliar music styles in the same way you would familiar ones.

EDIT: and since you've shown no examples of previous work I'm gonna go ahead and assume you've never recorded or mixed a band.
If you have, then I apologise, but am also curious and would like to listen to your previous work.
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Jun 5, 2011,
#22
So you get studio time, rights to the tracks and pieces to be graded for your course, whilst the bands only get studio time and no guarantee they can use those tracks? They're doing you a huge favour, you should at least sign the rights over to them after the grading, as a thank you.
#23
Quote by Deliriumbassist
So you get studio time, rights to the tracks and pieces to be graded for your course, whilst the bands only get studio time and no guarantee they can use those tracks? They're doing you a huge favour, you should at least sign the rights over to them after the grading, as a thank you.

also, this.
#24
Quote by CoreysMonster


No you can't. If you know your shit then you also know that your best results will always be with equipment, recording rooms, musicians and music styles you are most familiar with. No matter how good of an audio engineer you are, you cannot make up for bad equipment, bad performances or bad acoustics.

If you have, then I apologise, but am also curious and would like to listen to your previous work.


knowing how to make the best out of your equipment and how to compensate for
shit acoustics and etc is what separates the good engineers from the bad.

and second, yes i apologize for that, i'll upload some later today.
Last edited by R.I.M.S at Jun 5, 2011,
#25
Quote by Deliriumbassist
So you get studio time, rights to the tracks and pieces to be graded for your course, whilst the bands only get studio time and no guarantee they can use those tracks? They're doing you a huge favour, you should at least sign the rights over to them after the grading, as a thank you.


dude, honestly i dont even care about the rights n etc, i just want to gain experience in what im doing, that is, recording and mixing. im just putting the facts out there.
EDIT: its already been stated that given my permission they can use the songs for even commercial purposes.. never denied their rights to use the track.
Last edited by R.I.M.S at Jun 5, 2011,
#26
Quote by Deliriumbassist
So you get studio time, rights to the tracks and pieces to be graded for your course, whilst the bands only get studio time and no guarantee they can use those tracks? They're doing you a huge favour, you should at least sign the rights over to them after the grading, as a thank you.


I wouldn't do this with my band unless we got the rights.

At least he's already robbing musicians, he's on his way to the top
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#27
Quote by andyscoot
Are you doing A level or something? You think Metal is harder to mix than say, an Orchestra? This is coming from a Metal fan too.


Metal is pretty much the easiest thing to mix to be honest and yes I've done it so many times it sickens me on how easy it is..
Mixing an orchestra however, EVEN a vst one is one hell of a job..And I can back it up with a composition on my profile that contained 123 instruments + a choir..
I put a dollar in a change machine. Nothing changed.
Last edited by Necrolust at Jun 5, 2011,
#28
Quote by R.I.M.S
dude, honestly i dont even care about the rights n etc, i just want to gain experience in what im doing, that is, recording and mixing. im just putting the facts out there.
EDIT: its already been stated that given my permission they can use the songs for even commercial purposes.. never denied their rights to use the track.


Yes, given your permission. Thing is, I don't know you, the bands don't know you. There's nothing stopping you from saying 'no.' If you don't care about the rights, then there's no issue signing them over, is there?
#29
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Yes, given your permission. Thing is, I don't know you, the bands don't know you.


then why are you talking?
dont base your judgement on false assumptions, KNOW what you're talking about
before you actually speak about it.
#30
Quote by R.I.M.S
then why are you talking?
dont base your judgement on false assumptions, KNOW what you're talking about
before you actually speak about it.

his point is that before any band records with you for free, it would be wise to make a simple contract saying that you transfer the rights of the master to the band after everything is finished and that the band agrees for you to use the master for further promotional or educational purposes or whatever.

In any kind of business transaction, even on a lower level like this, you can never be too careful. I once had some hobby engineer record my old band and we paid him upfront, and he never finished half of the songs because we never made a written agreement to define by when we wanted the finished product.
It's just the way things should always be done, because as long as everyone's happy with the agreement then noone can back out or screw the other side over.
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Jun 5, 2011,
#31
Quote by CoreysMonster
his point is that before any band records with you for free, it would be wise to make a simple contract saying that you transfer the rights of the master to the band after everything is finished and that the band agrees for you to use the master for further promotional or educational purposes or whatever.


just because 1% people on UG are educated and actually know about music business
doesnt mean everyone does. For **** sakes, 90% of the people who replied
to this post probably didn't even know about such legal procedures; for all they know,
they go into the studio for free, record, and get a damn demo out of it. They're happy they have songs to hand out, im happy i got experience, why cause controversy over
a piece of paper?
just coz you got screwed over by some money hungry jackass doesnt mean all engineers are the same; im not doing this for money, it should be obvious, not sure
how you define FREE, but to me that definitely means "Not affected or restricted by a given condition or circumstance."
Last edited by R.I.M.S at Jun 5, 2011,
#32
Quote by R.I.M.S
then why are you talking?
dont base your judgement on false assumptions, KNOW what you're talking about
before you actually speak about it.



My point


Your head.

It's BECAUSE you aren't known that some form of guarantee beyond 'oh yeah, sure, I'll let you use your recordings, no problems' with maybe a spit and a handshake would be a goodwill gesture to the bands helping you out. If you renege on a 'gentleman's agreement' with a bsnd, your name will become synomynous with shit. It's just best to get things written down and sorted so there's no grey area.
#33
Pretty fishy you just keep the rights like that...
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██████████████████████████
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#34
Quote by R.I.M.S
just because 1% people on UG are educated and actually know about music business
doesnt mean everyone does. For **** sakes, 90% of the people who replied
to this post probably didn't even know about such legal procedures; for all they know,
they go into the studio for free, record, and get a damn demo out of it. They're happy they have songs to hand out, im happy i got experience, why cause controversy over
a piece of paper?

Because that's all part of getting experience. If you want to get clients and want people to take you seriously, then you need to act professionally, which includes being sure that things like the rights to the masters you record are taken care of and doesn't include telling people to fuck off.
Saying things like "I own the rights to the recordings" is NOT going to get you clients. Legal things like that scare bands away like a gunshot scattering a flock of birds, because very few musicians take the time to look into them, unless you immediately tell them you're going to sign them the rights over in a binding legal contract, which is the only way you CAN do that.

It's all part of things you are going to be doing non-stop if you ever work professionally in the business, so it's best to start getting used to it now.


Quote by Kensai
Pretty fishy you just keep the rights like that...

that part's actually true, since the person who recorded and mixed the recording created it, the recording is his intellectual property. Not the music, just the recording itself.
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Jun 5, 2011,
#35
Quote by CoreysMonster
Because that's all part of getting experience. If you want to get clients and want people to take you seriously, then you need to act professionally, which includes being sure that things like the rights to the masters you record are taken care of and doesn't include telling people to fuck off.
Saying things like "I own the rights to the recordings" is NOT going to get you clients. Legal things like that scare bands away like a gunshot scattering a flock of birds, because very few musicians take the time to look into them, unless you immediately tell them you're going to sign them the rights over in a binding legal contract, which is the only way you CAN do that.


all those legal processions are to be handled after the recordings anyways arent they?
plus im in a college doing this as a part of my course to gain experience, not in a professional studio trying to empty out musicians' wallets for my personal benefits..
so the whole legal issue, in this case, is nullified.
#36
So if you were a professional band, would you write up a contract to say you gain rights to the recording? Or do all these famous producers own the recordings of the albums they do?
#37
TS :
Sergio 'Checo' Perez 2013 Formula One World Drivers Champion
#38
Quote by andyscoot
So if you were a professional band, would you write up a contract to say you gain rights to the recording? Or do all these famous producers own the recordings of the albums they do?


a professional band isnt going to come to a college to record now are they?
2nd, producers either get royalties on the tracks, they partially own the rights to the
tracks that they've produced.... educate yourself son, dont breed in the cold, dark ruins of ignorance.
#39
by the way, just as a side note, this is a great debate to have on a somber sunday morning..
#40
Quote by R.I.M.S
all those legal processions are to be handled after the recordings anyways arent they?
plus im in a college doing this as a part of my course to gain experience, not in a professional studio trying to empty out musicians' wallets for my personal benefits..
so the whole legal issue, in this case, is nullified.



I just told you about what happened to my old band when some hobbiest recorded us without any kind of legal agreement as to when we wanted the songs done and he screwed us over.
The fact that you AREN'T a professional studio makes it even less likely for people to trust you, since you don't have a name or any credentials to rely on.
I realise that you are just a college student doing this for an assignment, but that doesn't mean that you should ignore the way things are done in the real world, because as soon as money starts moving around things go from "just a college project" to "hey that band is selling the recordings I legally own and making a profit off of them without giving me my cut!"

Quote by andyscoot
So if you were a professional band, would you write up a contract to say you gain rights to the recording? Or do all these famous producers own the recordings of the albums they do?

Actually, I don't know. Once record labels and producers are involved things get more complicated, and I'm pretty sure it differs from case to case, depending on what the band wants and what the record label wants.

But I'm pretty sure record labels usually keep the rights to the recordings, or else bands would be able to go "Whoop, we're out of contract now, we're signing to a bigger label now and are gonna have the recordings that you funded and advertised sold from there instead!"
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Jun 5, 2011,
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