#1
A group of more than 200 Japanese pensioners are volunteering to tackle the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima power station.

The Skilled Veterans Corps, as they call themselves, is made up of retired engineers and other professionals, all over the age of 60.

They say they should be facing the dangers of radiation, not the young.

It was while watching the television news that Yasuteru Yamada decided it was time for his generation to stand up.

No longer could he be just an observer of the struggle to stabilise the Fukushima nuclear plant.

The retired engineer is reporting back for duty at the age of 72, and he is organising a team of pensioners to go with him.

For weeks now Mr Yamada has been getting back in touch with old friends, sending out e-mails and even messages on Twitter.

Volunteering to take the place of younger workers at the power station is not brave, Mr Yamada says, but logical.

"I am 72 and on average I probably have 13 to 15 years left to live," he says.

"Even if I were exposed to radiation, cancer could take 20 or 30 years or longer to develop. Therefore us older ones have less chance of getting cancer."

Mr Yamada is lobbying the government hard for his volunteers to be allowed into the power station. The government has expressed gratitude for the offer but is cautious.

Certainly a couple of MPs are supporting Mr Yamada.

"At this moment I can say that I am talking with many key government and Tepco people. But I am sorry I can't say any more at this moment. It is on the way but it is a very, very sensitive issue politically," he said.

Certainly it is likely more workers will be needed.

The plant is still spewing radiation, nearly three months after an earthquake and tsunami knocked out its cooling systems, triggering explosions.

Its operator, Tepco, has now confirmed three of the reactors probably suffered meltdowns.

The plan is to bring the plant to a cold shutdown by January, although some experts believe that is over optimistic.

To cope with the disaster Japan has raised the radiation exposure limit for emergency workers from 100 millisieverts to 250 millisieverts.

But Tepco announced this week two workers at Fukushima might have already been exposed to more.

Many of Mr. Yamada's veterans are retired engineers like him.

Others are former power station workers, experts in factory design - and even a singer and two cooks - Mr Yamada says they will be useful to keep his team amused and fed.

Michio Ito used to be a primary school teacher but is spending his retirement helping out in a cafe that offers work experience to people with learning difficulties.

He is keen to swap his apron for a radiation suit.

"I don't think I'm particularly special," he says. "Most Japanese have this feeling in their heart. The question is whether you step forward, or you stay behind and watch.

"To take that step you need a lot of guts, but I hope it will be a great experience. Most Japanese want to help out any way they can."

Mr Yamada has already tried on his old overalls for size.

He says he is as fit as ever - with a lifetime of experience to bring to the task.

And he laughs off suggestions his proposed team is comparable to the kamikaze pilots who flew suicide missions in World War II.

"We are not kamikaze. The kamikaze were something strange, no risk management there. They were going to die. But we are going to come back. We have to work but never die."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13598607



Wow, that's so noble. Makes me wonder if the same would happen in the USA. probably not. your thoughts?
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Last edited by fearofthemark at May 31, 2011,
#2
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.
#3
Brought tears to my eyes when I saw it on the news.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#7
Quote by ethan_hanus
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.

Sadly, ^this.

Its good to know that there are people somewhere that would do it to help those around them, though.
Quote by Butt Rayge
Pretty sure Jesus was decaffeinated.


I'm just a hedonist without happiness
#8
Quote by ethan_hanus
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.



Having cartoon drawings of 10 year olds on pillows isn't noble
#9
Quote by ethan_hanus
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.

What exactly is your perception of the United States traditions and how are they being destroyed today?
#10
Quote by darkcheef


Having cartoon drawings of 10 year olds on pillows isn't noble


May the Schwartz be with us! 2012



MAL


Q: OK, so do you care about the labels — nastiest, edgiest team in the NFL?

Jim Schwartz: It's better than the alternative — meekest, least aggressive, softest team in the NFL.


#11
Quote by ethan_hanus
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.

#12
Quote by ethan_hanus
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.

The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#13
This isn't a JAPAN IS WEIRD THREAD, numpties.


That's a very decent thing to do, and I wish them the best of luck, despite the horrifying sickness that they may induce on themselves.
#14
Quote by ethan_hanus
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.

#15
Quote by severed-metal
This isn't a JAPAN IS WEIRD THREAD, numpties.

If it was I would be imploring people to read the synopsis of Seikon no Qwaser.

DO IT DO IT DO IT DO IT DO IT
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#16
Quote by RU Experienced?
What exactly is your perception of the United States traditions and how are they being destroyed today?


Well, the US used to be deeply rooted in the values and morals of the Christian faith, and since that one stupid lady from Austin who's name I forget, destroyed anything to do with religion or moral correctness, our traditions have moved from family, and kindness, helping people, being friendly to people, and raising your children with respect, and living your life with honor, to the people who are selfish, lazy, arrogant, and disrespectful to each other, and most of all, greedy.
#17
Quote by ethan_hanus
Well, the US used to be deeply rooted in the values and morals of the Christian faith, and since that one stupid lady from Austin who's name I forget, destroyed anything to do with religion or moral correctness, our traditions have moved from family, and kindness, helping people, being friendly to people, and raising your children with respect, and living your life with honor, to the people who are selfish, lazy, arrogant, and disrespectful to each other, and most of all, greedy.

Victory2134?
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#18
Quote by ethan_hanus
Well, the US used to be deeply rooted in the values and morals of the Christian faith, and since that one stupid lady from Austin who's name I forget, destroyed anything to do with religion or moral correctness, our traditions have moved from family, and kindness, helping people, being friendly to people, and raising your children with respect, and living your life with honor, to the people who are selfish, lazy, arrogant, and disrespectful to each other, and most of all, greedy.


What must it be like to view the world as a cartoon? It must be whimsical.
#19
Quote by ethan_hanus
Pssst, that would never happen in the US with the 60's generation, they would be like " Hell no, where's my pension!!! Stick it to the man!!!" or something...

The Japanese are noble people to begin with, they are rooted more deeply in their traditions, while in the US people have been trying their hardest to destroy our traditions.

#20
Quote by blackflag49
What must it be like to view the world as a cartoon? It must be whimsical.

Yup, might be whimisical.
#23
Its not a matter of Japan being "deeply rooted in tradition" While America isn't. Japan is a collectivist society where the whole is more important than the individual. America is the opposite. One isn't any more noble than the other, its just a culture difference.
Quote by MakinLattes
dwelling on past mishaps is for the weak. you must stride into the future, unabashed and prepared to fuck up yet again.
#24
I was amazed when I saw this. This is why I have so much respect for the Japanese people and their culture.
Quote by Virgil_Hart05
Beating the elderly is a big favourite of mine. Also, pushing kids over and kicking pregnant women in the womb is fun.



Right now we're called 'Various Artists' just to fuck over people with iPods
#25
Quote by darkcheef


Having cartoon drawings of 10 year olds on pillows isn't noble


bushido, nigga.
Quote by guitarxo
I had a dream about your avatar once, so yes of course.

Quote by Bladez22


every time i see that twirling electrode avatar of yours I know that the post is worth reading or the link is worth clicking


#27
Quote by itchy guitar
Its not a matter of Japan being "deeply rooted in tradition" While America isn't. Japan is a collectivist society where the whole is more important than the individual. America is the opposite. One isn't any more noble than the other, its just a culture difference.

This is true as well.
#29
In Japan it's about duty. For example, we say, "why give money to a homeless person, they'll just spend it on drugs," as opposed to their culture (and others, too) that would simply fulfill the duty of giving money to the homeless person, regardless of what happens after that. We look for results, they look simply to fulfill the duty at hand.

BTW, I don't know how the homeless are typically treated over there, that's just an example.
We're only strays.