#1
This is just a newly-formed random thought.

Let's say I'm writing a chord progression. On average, approximately how many different chords are there to choose from for the next chord?

Now, I know that one chord can be followed by any other chord, so the answer to the question is "as many chords as exist (minus one)". That's true, but it's rather unhelpful.

What I'm driving at is chord changes that don't sound random: contextual chord changes that follow some sort of musical rule.
#2
Depends on the scale you're playing. Learn your scales and you can count those chords yourself.
#3
as many as exist. seriously, but i know that doesn't help. it depends what type of music your writing. if your writing pop punk with power chords, chances are you've got a choice of maybe 5. if your writing some kinda contemporary classical thing, you've got a lot more options. it really comes down to the music your writing. some things would sound weird with more than 3 chords (pop punk/grunge etc) while some genres would suck with less than a good few chords.
#4
I've read ur post TS, and I would still say "every chord minus 1". Saying otherwise would close down ur freedom.

However, "every chord" works better if you've learned about the following;

Learn about cadences, and learn about voice leading. After that that learn about chord substitutions (a lot of jazz rooted stuff here)

Take notice that for voice leading and chord subs, you absolutely need to be familiar with basic music theory.


If you go deep enough into those 3 topics, it should pretty much allow you to gain full freedom of chord changes in a "good sounding way".

Chord substitutions might be too jazzy for ur personal taste, but cadences and voiceleading I'd say is essential for songs in ANY genre.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jun 2, 2011,
#5
Quote by Jehannum
This is just a newly-formed random thought.

Let's say I'm writing a chord progression. On average, approximately how many different chords are there to choose from for the next chord?

Now, I know that one chord can be followed by any other chord, so the answer to the question is "as many chords as exist (minus one)". That's true, but it's rather unhelpful.

What I'm driving at is chord changes that don't sound random: contextual chord changes that follow some sort of musical rule.


Maybe this lesson is something like what you're looking for.

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/57

Other than that - well, most fundamental chord movement is that by fifths, but moving in thirds is also very common. It's by no means a rule, but can sometimes be helpful in considering your options.
#6
Quote by Jehannum
Now, I know that one chord can be followed by any other chord, so the answer to the question is "as many chords as exist (minus one)". That's true, but it's rather unhelpful.


i don't care how unhelpful it is -- that's the answer.

chord changes aren't random -- the most outlandish, interesting ones are generally arrived at by voiceleading.
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#7
^Exactly. With good voice leading, you can do anything. Listen to later tonal composers like Hindemith.
#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
i don't care how unhelpful it is -- that's the answer.

chord changes aren't random -- the most outlandish, interesting ones are generally arrived at by voiceleading.

+1

sometimes its fun to stick a bunch of "out of key" chords together and stick melodies over it
#9
One. There is only one chord follows the first chord. all music is only made of two chords. H and Q.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
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