#1
I really want to start recording in my home. I'm looking for a decent setup that won't break my wallet but will allow me to record music that has presentable quality. I have limited knowledge about recording but I've come up with a couple different setups and I was wondering which of the two you more knowledgeable folk would recommend, or something else entirely.

I found this and it looks like it includes pretty much everything I'd need to get set up, and the reviews looked pretty good:

http://backstage.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/presonus-audiobox-usb-recording-package

The other potential route I am considering is using the Line 6 UX2 and buying a mic setup separately with either headphones or monitoring speakers. I've heard from pretty much everywhere that Shure SM57 mics are excellent choices.

http://backstage.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/line-6-pod-studio-ux2-with-pod-farm/250004000000000

Thanks for any advice you can impart.
#2
The MXL 990 is a crap mic. Also, those monitors in the first package are probably not going to be very good. You're better off buying a decent pair of monitoring headphones.

This depends what you're recording. The SM57 is a fantastic, trademark mic, that is for sure. but I can almost guarantee you won't be happy with it if you plan on recording vocals with it. But for just micing an amp or small acoustic parts, yes, it will be good, cheap, and near indestructable. Personally, I don't like the Pod, nor Pod Farm, but that's up to you. I'd suggest an M-Audio Fast Track II or Lexicon Lambda. But out of those two, I'd go with the second setup.
#3
I use an M-Audio MKII Fast Track Pro and directly input my guitar into the 1/4 jack. I run it through Amplitube or Guitar Rig on Nuendo 4.3 and double take the left and right pans to give it that professional fullness. A Shure SM58 is a good, low priced mic for agressive or clean vocals, and for bass you could just do a direct input with some EQ and a post filter high-cut plugin that comes with Nuendo. For drums, you could use EzDrummer and just import a midi file into it to get a nice, realistic drum track.

The M-audio interface is $120, and the mic is $130 and comes with a stand (last time I checked). For the software, I'm not sure. I have a general rule about software though: If you aren't going to make any money with your final product made from software, there's really no reason to "pay" for the software until you do. Just my opinion.

But with that setup I get this:

www.reverbnation.com/unfoldingtheabstract

Hope that helps some.

As for that package, it looks like a great deal. Just make sure you like what you're getting and that your pc can run it before you buy it. The mic is iffy, but I see you plan on grabbing an SM57, so thats no problem. You could do either or, so just make sure you're getting what you need with that package.
#4
Don't get EZDrummer, it's a waste of money. Just learn to sample. It sounds way better and is free. Also, you can get a SM58 for like $50-60 used. And you can probably find a stand for cheap used too.

As for software, just use Reaper. Free and good.
#5
PreSonus makes some good stuff. I am currently running a Line 6 UX2, its not a bad interface but some people have problems with them (which I believe is people not looking around and learning their interface inside and out.) I use to use a Lexicon Lambda in the past (had it for about 4 years before liquid spill kind of ruined it), but I believe it doesn't meet standard of todays sample rate (I could be wrong I can't remember off top of head). M-Audio also makes solid stuff (although I did have problems with a mobilepre interface I borrowed from a friend when I was till on Vista and traveling).

All of those interfaces are good and will work. I would recommend any of them.

Unless you have a nice sounding amp, I don't recommend micing an amp. The SM57 is a good choice for micing up cabs. There are many VST plugins for free made by people such as TSE, Poulin that I think compete and sound better than most people micing cabs. For more info check the Official Amp Sim thread, you may have to search it.

For monitors I have never heard of those. I have KRK Rokit 5s and they are great for a small room.
#6
Thanks to all of the advice from you all thus far. I have an additional question that may be stupid, but I want to be certain I understand it correctly. Most recording software will allow you to plug your guitar directly into your audio interface and then, using the software, manipulate how your guitar sounds, correct? Is that what VST plugins are?
#8
Quote by FireHawk
PreSonus makes some good stuff. I am currently running a Line 6 UX2, its not a bad interface but some people have problems with them (which I believe is people not looking around and learning their interface inside and out.) I use to use a Lexicon Lambda in the past (had it for about 4 years before liquid spill kind of ruined it), but I believe it doesn't meet standard of todays sample rate (I could be wrong I can't remember off top of head). M-Audio also makes solid stuff (although I did have problems with a mobilepre interface I borrowed from a friend when I was till on Vista and traveling).

All of those interfaces are good and will work. I would recommend any of them.

Unless you have a nice sounding amp, I don't recommend micing an amp. The SM57 is a good choice for micing up cabs. There are many VST plugins for free made by people such as TSE, Poulin that I think compete and sound better than most people micing cabs. For more info check the Official Amp Sim thread, you may have to search it.

For monitors I have never heard of those. I have KRK Rokit 5s and they are great for a small room.


Did you use the Line 6 UX2 to record your Satellite 3 tracks? They're great btw.
#9
Thanks a lot .

The newer songs for our album were recorded on the UX2. The only one currently uploaded is "Love Was Never Enough". The other songs were recorded on the Lexicon Lambda. To be honest the big difference in sound quality is technique, and mixing. I learned to capture sound and mix better. They could have been recorded on either interface and sounded the same.
#10
Well I am definitely considering the UX2 now. Do you use the software that is included with that or do you have another preference?
#11
My software is FL Studio 10. We use a variety of amp simulators for the guitars. TSE X50 and all of the Poulin amps are used. They are all free and can be found on there sites. After the amp simulator we run Keifer Impulse loader with some impulses I found on this site. For bass we use the TSE BOD pedal usually in front of POD Farm 2 (which comes with the UX2) or the clean guitar channel on Poulin LeXTAC guitar amp.

Guitars and bass are then always fed through Parametric EQ 2 that comes with FL Studio. So I can take out the lower frequencies. After that I usually run into the Sonitus FX Compressor (made by cakewalk comes with a bunch of other great plugins for $150ish dollar if you want it legally).
Last edited by FireHawk at Jun 2, 2011,
#13
Quote by CrossBack7


As for software, just use Reaper. Free and good.


Reaper is not free.
#14
I didn't read through everything, but make sure you have flat response studio monitors... wow did that make a difference in what I'm producing (I now have 3-4 pretty good sounding songs as opposed to my other 50 I posted, lol). Everything goes into a cheap and small mixer (even my guitar from my amp), and from there into 2 self-powered monitor studio speakers. Not top of the line, but KRK Rokit 8s. You can get smaller ones (Rokit 5s) and they still pack a heck of a lot of volume. I got the 8s, but really I over did it... super loud when working in a small room.
#15
The key difference between 5" and 8" cones isn't the volume. It's the bass response.

Generally, the consensus is that anything less than 6" is inadequate for producing good bass response. The balance in the low end for mixing on 8" speakers *should* be far superior to the balance in the low end mixing on 5" speakers.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.