#1
Ok so I just watched the freepower vid on finger independence and my mind was slightly blown. I've been playing for a few years and have always left fingers on the fret before if I could (i.e., if I'm doing a 1-2-3-4 chromatic and I'm on my pinky, my other 3 fingers would still be fretting - same if I'm playing a scale).

So I tried to be more conscious of this, and almost immediately my left hand/wrist felt less tense, and more able to move around faster/easier.

Now my question is, being conscious of it helps, but I'll still need to practice this at low speeds to get the full benefit that I can:


I practice about 2 hours per day, should I add in a scale or chromatic exercise that takes 10-15 mins each day to work purely on finger independence? Would this suffice to slowly but surely aid/seep into my playing? OR - should I be slowing down everything I play, all at once, and work on it for everything I do?
#2
Quote by -TM-
Ok so I just watched the freepower vid on finger independence and my mind was slightly blown. I've been playing for a few years and have always left fingers on the fret before if I could (i.e., if I'm doing a 1-2-3-4 chromatic and I'm on my pinky, my other 3 fingers would still be fretting - same if I'm playing a scale).

So I tried to be more conscious of this, and almost immediately my left hand/wrist felt less tense, and more able to move around faster/easier.

Now my question is, being conscious of it helps, but I'll still need to practice this at low speeds to get the full benefit that I can:


I practice about 2 hours per day, should I add in a scale or chromatic exercise that takes 10-15 mins each day to work purely on finger independence? Would this suffice to slowly but surely aid/seep into my playing? OR - should I be slowing down everything I play, all at once, and work on it for everything I do?


If you really want to see improvements then you should probably do it for about 10-20 minutes a day, you can see real improvements relatively quickly that way.

That being said I think really the most important things to take from that video are the principles of correct practice and finger independence and so on, not matter what exercise or song you apply the principles to.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#4
Good Finger independence is one trait that helps all other aspects of your playing. So it's good work it on a regular basis. The daily repetition is how it develops.

I do some every practice session - around 15-30 minutes.
My best advice is to take it slow and easy... Relax and focus for best results. (it's not something to rush through)

You also might want to gather a variety of these type exercises so you don't get bored of doing the same things every day.
good luck.
#5
Quote by -TM-
Ok so I just watched the freepower vid on finger independence and my mind was slightly blown. I've been playing for a few years and have always left fingers on the fret before if I could (i.e., if I'm doing a 1-2-3-4 chromatic and I'm on my pinky, my other 3 fingers would still be fretting - same if I'm playing a scale).

So I tried to be more conscious of this, and almost immediately my left hand/wrist felt less tense, and more able to move around faster/easier.


So is that what you are attempting to do? Keep your fingers more economical when playing such runs? Or are you trying to avoid doing that?
#6
Here is my question, since I've seen a bunch of talk about these pseudo-chromatic exercises lately: what is the advantage of doing these versus applying the same mindfulness when playing, for example, a GMaj scale in different positions?
#7
Simply put, you exercise all four fingers equally, and you can drill more "awkward" combinations quicker.

eg, when was the last time you played a scalar sequence or lick where you had to go 1423?

There's no inherent advantage, you could certainly come up with good musical ways to practice this stuff, just the concept is clear and simple doing chromatics.