#1
Basically i wanna tap like this
What can i do to get started?
I'm already alright at tapping on 1 or 2 strings, and i can play stuff like some of the tapping in Protest the hero songs, bloodmeat etc.
any suggestions to songs or exercises would be great
#3
To tap like that, you've got to work your way up to that level in a methodical way. Start off with single string tapping, then advance to string crossing, then string skips and after that, if you're really looking to get advanced with it, multiple finger tapping. Just start off with single string tapped arps and scales, then go to string crossing arps and scales, so on and so on. By practicing the scales and arpeggios, you'll establish a nice, thorough technical foundation that will help you a great deal when you start trying to take on songs. Plus, practice of standard scales and arps will be more easily applied to your improvisation than excerpts from various songs.

However, if you wanna take a more song-centered route, here's a list of songs/pieces for the various levels of tapping.

Single String: Van Halen-"Eruption", "Hot for Teacher", ect.

Joe Satriani- "Satch Boogie"

String Crossing: Reb Beach- "Black Magic"

String Skipping: Symphony X- "Sea of Lies", "Of Sins and Shadows", "Out of the Ashes"

Guthrie Govan- "Fives

Multi Finger Tapping:
Guthrie Govan- "Sevens"

Joe Satriani- "Midnight"

Chris Broderick- Betcha Can't Play This

Animals as Leaders- Tempting Time


Also, don't neglect left hand legato training. The majority of the time, the tapping that you'll be doing will be mostly left hand. When your left hand is already adept at hammer ons, pull offs, strings skips and all that, learning to execute tapping licks will be substantially easier than going about it without a decent left hand. Plus, when it comes down to it, legato will have a good bit more practical application than tapping will in the long run.
Last edited by Faded Grey at Jun 2, 2011,
#4
^ Woah. Thanks man xD thats a HUGE help, i'll definitely follow some of that advice haha
#5
Alright, I'm going to say this because I've noticed that it goes unmentioned in a lot of tutorials, demonstrations, and threads in relation to tapping: Focus on the economy of your tapping finger(s) and the clarity of your tapped notes. Of the players I know who have demonstrated relative fluency with tapping on one string or even tapping of a slightly more complex nature, all but two applied effective practice methodologies to tapping, and it shows in how they tap.

I recommend the following: practice tapping exactly as you would effectively practice your general technique with your fretting hand. Pay attention to the muscles in your hand and arm as you tap, and try to use only muscles controlling your tapping finger when you play. Once you've isolated your movement to your finger alone, focus on moving it as little as possible to play the tapped note cleanly. Now, I don't know whether you prefer conventional legato or Chopin(truest of true ever) / Holdsworth (truest of guitar ever) legato, but once you can tap the note cleanly and efficiently, focus on either pulling off with your tapping finger (conventional) or taking your tapping finger off of the fret and relaxing it while hammering back down with the finger playing the next note (Holdsworth) as efficiently and cleanly as possible.

To improve yourself overall when tapping, attempt to keep your wrists as straight as possible to reduce strain, and try to relax your fingers. Treat the practice of tapping as you would the practice of your general technique and you ought to see very good improvement in good time and experience less excessive tension in your hands, allowing for increased fluidity and articulation.
You might could use some double modals.
Last edited by AETHERA at Jun 2, 2011,
#6
Quote by AETHERA

Now, I don't know whether you prefer conventional legato or Chopin(truest of true ever) / Holdsworth (truest of guitar ever) legato, but once you can tap the note cleanly and efficiently, focus on either pulling off with your tapping finger (conventional) or taking your tapping finger off of the fret and relaxing it while hammering back down with the finger playing the next note (Holdsworth) as efficiently and cleanly as possible.


^ Thank you for the advice
I'm not really familiar with The Chopin/Holdsworth technique, and i've never really tried it. Is this better than conventional legato technique at all, or is it a matter of preference?
#7
Quote by greeneyegat
^ Thank you for the advice
I'm not really familiar with The Chopin/Holdsworth technique, and i've never really tried it. Is this better than conventional legato technique at all, or is it a matter of preference?


Chopin being mainly a piano composer that doesn't quite apply to what we're doing.

Don't worry about bloody 'Holdworthian' legato for now, it's not something you need to concern yourself with until you've got very strong 'standard' legato technique. Really it's a matter of preference (or being a dick if you're Marshall Harrison); some people would argue that guitar legato isn't 'true' legato but really, ignore that for now, it's quite beside what you need or want.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Chopin being mainly a piano composer that doesn't quite apply to what we're doing.

Don't worry about bloody 'Holdworthian' legato for now, it's not something you need to concern yourself with until you've got very strong 'standard' legato technique. Really it's a matter of preference (or being a dick if you're Marshall Harrison); some people would argue that guitar legato isn't 'true' legato but really, ignore that for now, it's quite beside what you need or want.


Thanks for clearing that up