#1
After I got my new Squier VM P bass,
the white neck just seemed to clash
with the body,



I read about Kiwi on necks and how
it can be removed if you don't like it.
So I tried it,





What do you folks think?

Tabdog
#2
I'm on the fence.

It gives it a really cool vintage look, but I really do like the bright maple it started with.

How are you liking it?
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Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


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Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#3
Did it have an existing finish? Just curious seems like it would smear off on your hands
#4
I like how it looks, definitely saves a fortune on all the cigarettes you'd have to smoke to get it that tobacco-yellowed look. I too would be concerned with it rubbing off and / or feeling weird though.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#5
To answer both of you, this is my first try.
I have not even played it yet.

I will get back in a little bit when I have had
a chance to plug her in,

Tabdog
#6
Quote by Caustic
I like how it looks, definitely saves a fortune on all the cigarettes you'd have to smoke to get it that tobacco-yellowed look. I too would be concerned with it rubbing off and / or feeling weird though.


I was wondering about that myself.

The answer is,

when I started playing it, I forgot all about
it and just played for about half an hour.

It does feel a little different, but it feels dry
and and seems fine as far as feel goes. My
hands did not feel any different or have any
color or odor after playing.

The real test will be when it's hot and sweat
runs all over all over it. Then we'll see,

Tabdog
#7
Hmm, considering giving this a crack then, since the smoking ban the estimated time it'd take for me to yellow out my gear has skyrocketed

Will probably research it and try it on a spare neck I have knocking around before actually doing it though, don't want to icky up my neck in the name of aesthetics :P
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#8
Here's some details.

First off, I took the strings off. I used Kiwi
brown shoe polish,



I started on the the heal. I soon realized
that what I needed to do was to rub it on
thick, like when shinning shoes. Then I let
it dry, and then I rubbed it off. What you
see, is what's left,



I used a small piece of tea shirt and a tooth
brush for the hard to get to places. It worked
on the fretboard as well as the rest of the
neck.

After it dried, it took a small amount of elbow
grease to get the excess off. It came off the
tuning gears fairly easy and did not stain the
body.

I just got through playing it for half an hour.
I forgot all about it as soon as I started playing.

It feels a little different, but it feels dry and I
like the feel just fine.

My hands did not feel funny or have any color
from the shoe polish after I played.

I like it just fine.

I have read where others heated the Kiwi for
application. Heating makes it runny and it may
penetrate better, I don't know,

Tabdog
#9
Quote by gilly_90
I'm on the fence.

It gives it a really cool vintage look, but I really do like the bright maple it started with.

How are you liking it?


I'm on the fence as well. It will be interesting on how it ages over time.
#10
Man that looks great imo. Something to think about for my Lakland if I end up keeping it.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#11
I found this on how to do this if anyone else is interested (and it has some Pros and Cons);


"How to:
1. Take the guitar neck off the body, and take all of the hardware (tuning keys, posts and post bushings, and string retainers) off of the neck.
2. Get a nice, smooth, clean, lint-free chamois or cloth and a can of Brown Kiwi Shoe polish.
3. Put your index finger and middle finger into the chamois, and then take this point of the chamois and daub it very lightly into the polish. (Be careful here--the brown polish easily soaks through the chamois and turns the tips of your fingers orange-brown, which is difficult to wash off. I advise that you fold the chamois/cloth over double to lessen a leak-through, or wear some rubber or plastic gloves under the chamois/cloth.)
4. Rub the polish on the neck a little at a time in an even, very thin layer; keep doing this until you have the entire neck covered with a very, VERY, VERY light layer of shoe polish. Set the neck to one side for about 10 or 15 minutes, making sure that you don't lay it or lean it against something important or valuable that will stain (like furniture, clothing, etc.).
5. Take your chamois/cloth and buff out the polish really well. Use some "elbow grease" behind the buffing/polishing. Buff that sucker dry.
6. After thoroughly buffing/polishing the neck until it is dry and the polish doesn't rub off onto the chamois, set the neck aside overnight.
7. If you like the shade, put the hardware back on and put the neck back on the guitar; however, if the shade is still too light, repeat the above process until desired shade is achieved. (Be careful that you don't repeat too many times; the neck can turn a dark, unattractive orange/brown/burnt-umberish after only three or four polish coats.)

Pros:It looks very cool;After carefully buffing the polish in really good with some elbow grease, the polish/tint won't rub off on your hands or your clothes at all.

Cons:It's not permanent--it wears away, to a large degree, after several months, thus requiring a new application;If you apply too much at a time on the fretboard, the polish tends to build up in the little nooks and crannies along the frets and stays there, which looks terrible. (Advice: Rub the polish into the fretboard very sparingly--just a little at a time--to avoid this ugly situation.)"
#12
Thanks Bob, and thank you Fred,,, lol

That is very informative,

Tabdog
#13
I think it looks great, I love tinted maple on Fenders/Squiers. I am curious to see how well it weathers over time.

If you do decide you want to make it permanent, there's always the option of stripping the existing satin finish off the neck, applying the vintage tint (which you can buy from ReRanch) and refinishing the neck. Its a bit of a job though.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#14
Quote by Bobfred75


Cons:


Yes, this was my concern. I don't want my vintage look rubbing off like so much fake tan on a popped collar.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#15
Quote by Tostitos
I think it looks great, I love tinted maple on Fenders/Squiers. I am curious to see how well it weathers over time.

If you do decide you want to make it permanent, there's always the option of stripping the existing satin finish off the neck, applying the vintage tint (which you can buy from ReRanch) and refinishing the neck. Its a bit of a job though.


I think this finish, as many are now days, is
an oil finish. Many necks have other types of
finishes.

You can simply sand, or alter a spot and and
hit it with lemon oil and it may work fine. I have
re-shaped headstocks just using lemon oil and
it matched the rest of the neck, no problem.

An oil finished neck feels better than most necks
finished with regular varnish or polyurethane or
plastic resins. You can use fine steel wool on the
back of an oil finished neck to keep it smooth
feeling with no ill effects. It should be lemon oiled
every now and then though.

With the oil finished necks it a simpler to
stain.

It is also simple to screw up.

That makes me hesitant to mess with it sense
my VM P is new.

I have rubbed my neck with lemon oil which
lightened the tent.

I'm a big fan of lemon oil when it is applicable.

I keep fret rot at bay on my 25 year old
Westone Electra. It has a real time yellowed
neck. Fret rot will ruin the frets and fingerboard.

Here it is with my VM before the Kiwi job,





The Electra spoiled me for ever. I can not find
a Jazz bass that sounds as good.

So, I have never been able to buy a Jazz bass
for myself. I bought a US Jazz bass for my son,
but it doesn't sound near as good as my Electra.

It is so rare few will ever know,

Tabdog
#16
Quote by tabdog
I think this finish, as many are now days, is
an oil finish. Many necks have other types of
finishes.

On the Squier it's actually a satin polyurethane finish.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#17
Quote by Tostitos
On the Squier it's actually a satin polyurethane finish.



Thanks. You may be right. I'm no finish expert
by a long shot. It seems the older ones were
usually a more varnish type finish. Now days
they seem to vary more.

I have altered Samick, Squier and Silvertone
head stocks. All I used was lemon oil to re-finish.
You can not tell difference where the original
finish is and where the re-finishes is. It's a
perfect match. With the glossy necks, this is not
possible.

Tabdog
#18
just curious, what's your purpose behind altering headstocks, and what are you altering them too?
#19
Wow Tabdog this makes me want to get the maple VM even more if I can do the Kiwi to it.
#20
Quote by askrere
just curious, what's your purpose behind altering headstocks, and what are you altering them too?


This Samick made Abilene bass had a crack where
it took a lick on on top. It did not appear to be deep.

I kept taking it down until the crack was no more,







This is an old job on an old unknown guitar. It had
messed up tuner holes. I had to drill them out.





That's the only ones I have photos of.

A Silvertone had a black top. It had a point below
the logo that had a chip gone. I reshaped it until the
chip was gone. It had another point that I just didn't
like. I had to remove the black finish which was messed
up.

I had a Squire neck that I put on an unknown body. I
made the headstock smaller because it was so but ugly
big,

Tabdog
Last edited by tabdog at Jun 3, 2011,
#21
that kiwi ish did some good work. be hard to get that look with a stain i think. although, id be concerned with it drying my neck out really quick and also changing weird colors (for some reason greying comes to mind). keep applying it and itll look sick forevah.
My name is Greg, use it.

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Angry

Hopeful
#22
Since Maple necks and fretboards have a protective finish such as Poly, Acrylic, etc. you'll need to scuff it a bit for any tint (dye, leather dye, stain, etc.) to adhere properly. Once you get the look/finish you want, you'll have to clearcoat it. Polyurethane, Polycrylic, Nitro, etc. are available in spraycans at most bigbox DIY stores like Lowes, Home Depot, Ace, etc.