#1
I just got a Audix fusion 6 drum mic set and I have a question about the overheads (F-15 )


What would be the best way to set them up over the kit for metal?
I'm looking for a decently wide stereo spread but I have no idea what techniques there are.

Any help is appreciated!
#4
I don't have a ton of experience recording drums, but assuming you pan the drums a little know.

Here is a link on recording drums.
http://www.audio-production-tips.com/drum-recording.html

Also here is a link for mixing drums.
http://www.audio-production-tips.com/mixing-drums.html#
Last edited by FireHawk at Jun 2, 2011,
#5
No... No inverting. It really depends on how your drums are setup. If you've got a crash on each side then I would place the overheads on boom stands about 5'-7' away from the cymbals. Raise the stands as high as they'll go and do your best to point the mic's at the head of the drummer
#6
Quote by vjferrara
No... No inverting. It really depends on how your drums are setup. If you've got a crash on each side then I would place the overheads on boom stands about 5'-7' away from the cymbals. Raise the stands as high as they'll go and do your best to point the mic's at the head of the drummer

I don't really want to move the cymbals, I've only got a crash on the left. I usually point (my old overheads) at the first tom facing to the left and the other 5' to the right facing the 2nd tom. Would the way you suggested be an improvement?
Last edited by Kyleisthename at Jun 2, 2011,
#7
Quote by Kyleisthename
I don't really want to move the cymbals, I've only got a crash on the left. I usually point (my old overheads) at the first tom facing to the left and the other 5' to the right facing the 2nd tom. Would the way you suggested be an improvement?


It would definitely be an improvement. When you have individual Tom mic's there is no need to use the overhead mic's on them. If by left you mean from drummer's perspective then I would place an overhead about 5' directly in front of the cymbal.

What is your actual drum setup? That would help a lot to know what drums/cymbals you have and how big your room is
#8
I am bringing a drummer in tomorrow so I don't have an idea of what the kit he is using.
My room is 16.5 ft x 12ft with a 12 ft ceiling that has angles on the corners of were the wall meets the top (used to be a paint booth). The drumset is going to be in the back corner of the room
#9
Ok... I'm just going to assume he has a "normal" kit. Be ready for at least 1 kick, 2 crashes, 1 ride, 3-4 toms, and a snare. He could have more or less so you'll have to adjust accordingly.

If it were me I wouldn't have him backed in the corner. Try setting him about 6'-8' from a corner with his kick drum facing the corner. Then I would place the overheads about 5' away from the crashes which will probably be on either side of him. Don't put them in front of the kit, keep the overheads to the sides. Raise them as high as the boom stands will allow and try to point the mic's directly at the drummer's head. This should give you an even spread of the kit. Have you ever mic'd drums in this room before?
#10
Thanks man, I'll try experimenting with my kit before he come in.
I've recorded a three 4 track demo for my band, This is a song I recorded using the method I stated above with 2 mxl 990 and some radio shack mics. (for the drums). I do have sound treatment in my room eliminating almost all of the rooms reverb.
#11
Eliminating reverb is awesome for metal! When I practice recording drums I use as many mic's as possible just so that I have something to play with and learn how to mix/eq/etc. I've found that with metal drums there doesn't need to be any room reverb. Adding a little to the kick and snare afterwards is fine but during the actual recording none would be preferable. I'll check out the recording you did when I get home so I can listen on my computer instead of my phone
#12
You cant go wrong with an XY over the kit. Center it on the cymbals and about as high as you can fairly comfortably reach. A spaced pair is second best in my opinion but you have to decide if the phase issues you could run into are worth it and also, any distance between mics that's greater than the distance between your ears is unnatural sounding. There's other overhead techniques, but I find that an XY is the best place to start and probably the "safest" way to go.
#13
Quote by sandyman323
You cant go wrong with an XY over the kit. Center it on the cymbals and about as high as you can fairly comfortably reach. A spaced pair is second best in my opinion but you have to decide if the phase issues you could run into are worth it and also, any distance between mics that's greater than the distance between your ears is unnatural sounding. There's other overhead techniques, but I find that an XY is the best place to start and probably the "safest" way to go.



XY is also definitely a good way to go. I just assumed that he didn't have big enough booms to do that. Def give XY a shot if they're big enough.
#14
I think I have big enough boom stands for it, they guy doesn't get here till 5:00pm so I've got some time to mess with different overhead configurations.

Also, is it good to mic where the drum beaters hit the bass drum, or can I duplicate the original drum track and eq one for "clicky" sound and another for a deeper sound?
#15
Quote by Kyleisthename
I think I have big enough boom stands for it, they guy doesn't get here till 5:00pm so I've got some time to mess with different overhead configurations.

Also, is it good to mic where the drum beaters hit the bass drum, or can I duplicate the original drum track and eq one for "clicky" sound and another for a deeper sound?



There are a lot of things that you can do for clicky bass sounds. Aiming at where the beaters hit the drum is one of them. You can also tape a quarter on the inside of the head where the beater hits. Duplicating them is an option but is a little overboard in my opinion. If it is a good sounding drum and you get a good recording of it you should be able to just use one track and eq that rather than copying it and eq'ing two tracks. That just seems like more work than is needed.