#1
Whats the formula for the major scales? I keep doing research but no one has explained it in a clear way.
#2
WWHWWWH

W= whole step (2 frets)
H= half step (1 step)

notes:
G#/Ab A A#/Bb B C C#/Db D E#/Eb E F F#/Gb G

start on one note and move either one or two spaces depending on the W or H so the key of C major is

C D E F G A B C
C to D is a whole step, E to F is a half step......

hope this helps
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#3
Quote by krypticguitar87
WWHWWWH

W= whole step (2 frets)
H= half step (1 step)

notes:
G#/Ab A A#/Bb B C C#/Db D E#/Eb E F F#/Gb G

start on one note and move either one or two spaces depending on the W or H so the key of C major is

C D E F G A B C
C to D is a whole step, E to F is a half step......

hope this helps

this

or if you know your intervals, the major scale is just all natural intervals
i.e. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
#5
Another way to look at it is that the intervals from the root note to the other notes is always either major or perfect. But WWHWWWH is probably what you were looking for.
#6
W-W-H-W-W-W-H.

A whole step equates to 2 frets on the guitar and a half step equates to one.

You said that you hadn't got a clear explanation of this concept yet, so I'll try and give you one. With a theory matter like this, it's best to explain it in a way that goes beyond the basic step formula.

There's seven notes in the major scale: The root (tonic), 2nd (supertonic), 3rd (mediant), 4th (subdominant), 5th (dominant), 6th (submediant) and the 7th (leading tone). After the 7th comes the octave, the repetition of the root, and the pattern repeats all over again. Depending on where you study theory, you might see the same intervals referred to by different names.

The note that you start on will define the technical name of the major scale and will be the point from which the W-W-H-W-W-W-H pattern begins. So, for example, let's look at some of the various major scales in the increasing sharp order of the Circle of Fifths.

C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C- C Major

G-A-B-C-D-E-F#-G- G Major

D-E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D- D Major

As you'll notice, the first note is the starting point from which the rest of the scale will come and also puts the letter in front of it's name (ex: E Phrygian, A Harmonic Minor and Bb Minor Pentatonic). This is the same with every other scale in the book. That said, it's highly advisable that if you don't know it already, you learn the notes of the fretboard. It will prove to be invaluable for much, much more than crafting major scales. It will help you in the long run with all things theoretical and help tremendously with your fretboard visualization.

When a song is in a major key, for example F Major, (F-G-A-Bb-C-D-E-F), that means that it's constructed using a chord progression from that scale/key. If you were to play in F Major, you'd play over a chord progression based off of the intervals that make F major. The same interval terminology that is used to refer to single notes also is applicable to chord progressions utilized within keys. For example, if you were to play a song in the key of C Major and utilize a C-E-G chord progression (C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C), you could refer to the progression as a 1-3-5 in the key of C. As you'll notice, the note of the scale which is the root of the chord being played can be referred to by it's interval number within the key.
#11
what is it for minor scales?
~~~...:::My Gear:::...~~~
~.:.ESP LTD H-1001FM.:.~
~.:.Peavey Vypyr 15W.:.~
~.:.DigiTech RP355.:.~
~.:.Roland MicroCube.:.~
#13
Take the major scale and move the third sixth and seventh notes of the major scale a half step step down
W-H-W-W-H-W-H