#1
So i just learned about the circle of fifths and that it somehow ties into changing the key of a song during the song.

i didn't understand this too well and wondered if anyone could expand on this, namely how the circle show the best key transitions. let's just say i'm playing a song in the key of D, what would be the most logical (best sounding) key to switch to?
#2
Quote by gunsnroses#1
So i just learned about the circle of fifths and that it somehow ties into changing the key of a song during the song.

i didn't understand this too well and wondered if anyone could expand on this, namely how the circle show the best key transitions. let's just say i'm playing a song in the key of D, what would be the most logical (best sounding) key to switch to?

The Co5's shows which keys are closely related. For example, C Major has no sharps/flats. Right next to C on the Co5's is F Major (1 flat) and G Major (1 sharp). These are the easiest keys to transition to because they're right next to each other on the Co5. Reason being, that they share every note but one.

Keys on the opposite end, however, are a wee bit harder to work with. Like C and Gb Major. Going from no flats to 6 requires some good phrasing, thinking, and voice-leading to make it sound nice.
#3
ok so the closer the keys are on the circle, the easier it will be to transition to them. thanks dude!
#4
Work you're way back through the circle for modulation.

The Circle of 5th's a a way of organizing Keys.



As you move clock wise you add more #'s and then less b's. These show you the Keys as you'd see them in notation.

If you look at the Circle of 5th's moving clockwise...it moves in 5th's. But, if you look at the circle counter clock wise, it's in 4th's.

Playing 5th's (or 4th's) you can create practically endless chord movements...very nice chord movements...changing through keys.

In Jazz and Blues it's used like this in a turnaround in G...

||: G | C | G | Dm | C | C#dim | G | E7 | A7 | D7 | G7 E7 | A7 D7 :||

See how the E7->A7->D7->G7 move in 5th's/4th's?

Another use is a road map of ii-V-I progressions. You can start anywhere in the circle and make your starting note a min7 chord, then the next note counter clockwise, make it a dominant 7 chord. Then move one more note counter clock wise and make a maj7 chord from that note.

You've just created a ii7-V7-maj7 progression in the Key of the last note (the one you built the maj7 from).

Let's say you start on D, make it Dm7, then move back to G, making it G7, and then back once more to C, making it Cmaj7. The ii-V-I you created is in the Key of C: Dm7-G7-Cmaj7. Works this way no matter where you start.

From there you can do a TON of modulations with this idea (I'll start at F in the circle and modulate all the way back to F (when repeating) using ii-V-I's, it creates and endless cycle, or circle:

||: Fm | Bb7 | Ebmaj7 | Ebmaj7 | Ebm7 | Ab7 | Dbmaj7 | Dbmaj7 | Dbm7 | F#7 | Bmaj7 | Bmaj7 | Bm7 | E7 | Amaj7| Amaj7 | Am7 | D7 | Gmaj7 | Gmaj7 | Gm7 | C7 | Fmaj7 | Fmaj7 :||


Another thing with the circle is, you can see everynote IN a Key, and every note OUT of Key...

Take the Key of C (C D E F G A B C)

With a pencil, start at C and draw a line to G, continue it to D then to A then to E then to B...now, for the next note draw a line from B directly across the circle to F. Then continue your line from F to C.

You've completed all of the notes in the Key of C...but...

ALL the notes to the right are IN Key...and ALL the notes to the left are OUT of Key.

There's plenty more goofy stuff you can do with it...it's interesting though.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Jun 3, 2011,