#1
I want to be able to switch from one guitar to another easily, such as my LTD to my SG, but as each one responds so differently to distortion on/off and have such different output levels, it's impossible to just switch.

For example, my LTD has a fairly good response to distortion, so I have my Boss ST-2 "loud" dial to about 12 oclock and the jump between clean and distorted is just right. However when I plug my SG into the same loop, the ST-2 at 12 is at least twice as loud as the clean sound, so it has to be between 8 and 9 oclock, which is ridiculously low.

Other than replacing pickups and circuitry to make each guitar exactly the same, is there a way around it like some kind of level normalising pedal to put at the start of the loop?
PRS SE Chris Robertson
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Rather large pedalboard..
#3
Quote by funeralllllllll
compression


I think TS wants a reverse compression (to make your SG less loud, rather than your LTD louder). Unfortunately, I don't know of any pedals that do that.

EDIT: Volume pedal. Jesus Christ I'm retarded.
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Last edited by jwd724 at Jun 4, 2011,
#4
Pickups will have a major impact on the sound levels. What you can do is to max out your volume and try to lower / increase the height of your pickups so that their volumes somewhat match up.

One problem is that with such an adjustment, it assumes that the pup configuration of your LTD and SG are identical.

The other problem is that adjusting the height of pups will impact the tonal sound of the guitar and its dynamics. Too high will make a guitar muddy, cut sustain and make your signal clip earlier. Too low and you lose volume, chunk and you will find you might have a harder time driving your preamp.

On top of all that, you might end up disliking 1 guitar's tone over the other.

My advice, just live with the issue, or think of other ways around it... such as getting a volume pedal and using that to adjust your signal level before it hits any pedal.
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#5
Quote by jwd724
I think TS wants a reverse compression (to make your SG less loud, rather than your LTD louder). Unfortunately, I don't know of any pedals that do that.

EDIT: Volume pedal. Jesus Christ I'm retarded.

He wants the SG louder and the LTD quieter I think.
Basically when he steps on the distortion, his SG jumps in volume due to his pedals natural compression.

@TS: Am I right?
#6
The guitars have volume knobs, no? Turn down the one that is too loud.

or consider a few more pedals and a loop/bypass pedal, have 2 pedal paths and dial each one in for the guitar you want. It makes little sense to want the two guitars to sound the same, why bother to switch then? Give each one it's unique tone and enjoy.
Quote by CodChick


Seriously, I'm not a fan of iphones and guitars mixing.
Last edited by ecvMatt at Jun 4, 2011,
#8
Quote by ecvMatt
The guitars have volume knobs, no? Turn down the one that is too loud.


I agree, i never run my guitars with the volume maxed anyway. I think it sounds a a lot better and it gives you a boost at your finger tips.

Volume pedal may help, but I think that would basicly work like your volume on your guitar.
#9
Quote by ecvMatt
The guitars have volume knobs, no? Turn down the one that is too loud.

or consider a few more pedals and a loop/bypass pedal, have 2 pedal paths and dial each one in for the guitar you want. It makes little sense to want the two guitars to sound the same, why bother to switch then? Give each one it's unique tone and enjoy.


Where did you get the idea I wanted them to sound the same? Yeah I'll use the same pedals but that won't make the guitars sound the same, I just want them to have the similar volume response so I can switch easily.

I would go and buy another set of pedals so I can have a different line for different guitars, but that's a lot more money than I have so it isn't really an option. The main thing that puts me off a volume pedal is that (unless I'm mistaken) they tend to be an expression pedal style thing, which isn't particularly accurate, and as my band plays on a fairly small stage it's quite important to get the levels right otherwise you either don't hear yourself, or deafen the rest of the band. If there was a volume pedal that you could preset to switch from 50% to 80% or something, then I'd go for that.

The other thing is not the overall volume of the guitar as such, cause that is something you can fix with a single pedal I suppose, but it's the way in which each one responds to distortion. I have a strat which has similar output to my LTD when clean, but doubles the volume when I turn the distortion on. That could well be due to the difference between buckers and singles, but the SG does it too, just not to the same extreme. So even if I adjust the overall volume of the guitar, I'd still have to change the settings on the ST-2..
PRS SE Chris Robertson
PRS SE EG
PRS SE Angelus Custom
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..
#10
Quote by makutoid
Where did you get the idea I wanted them to sound the same? Yeah I'll use the same pedals but that won't make the guitars sound the same, I just want them to have the similar volume response so I can switch easily.

I would go and buy another set of pedals so I can have a different line for different guitars, but that's a lot more money than I have so it isn't really an option. The main thing that puts me off a volume pedal is that (unless I'm mistaken) they tend to be an expression pedal style thing, which isn't particularly accurate, and as my band plays on a fairly small stage it's quite important to get the levels right otherwise you either don't hear yourself, or deafen the rest of the band. If there was a volume pedal that you could preset to switch from 50% to 80% or something, then I'd go for that.

The other thing is not the overall volume of the guitar as such, cause that is something you can fix with a single pedal I suppose, but it's the way in which each one responds to distortion. I have a strat which has similar output to my LTD when clean, but doubles the volume when I turn the distortion on. That could well be due to the difference between buckers and singles, but the SG does it too, just not to the same extreme. So even if I adjust the overall volume of the guitar, I'd still have to change the settings on the ST-2..


ummm....

Quote by makutoid


Other than replacing pickups and circuitry to make each guitar exactly the same, is there a way around it like some kind of level normalising pedal to put at the start of the loop?



How about this?
Quote by CodChick


Seriously, I'm not a fan of iphones and guitars mixing.
#11
What kind of pickups does each guitar have?

Sounds like your Strat has low out out pickups, your Sg has medium out pickups and the LTD has high output pickups(EMG's?)...
#13
Quote by redandwhite12
use an mxr micro amp to boost the low volume one and just turn it off when your using the high volume one.


That sounds about right. I've always heard of this as the trick.
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#14
ummm....

I never said that's what I wanted, that was reference to the physical aspects of the guitar in regards to the output levels coming from it, I thought that was pretty clear.

I'll have a look at the mxr one, see if that looks alright. Still doesn't solve the difference in volume jumps from clean to distorted on each different guitar though...
PRS SE Chris Robertson
PRS SE EG
PRS SE Angelus Custom
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..