#1
Could any of you UG formers give me an idea of how to Coil Split/ or tap a stacked Humbucker? I've been thinking about doing this to a tele, just so I can get twang or not so much twang. Or maybe if thats not possible how to route the esquire "bleed" switch into a 2 pickup guitar. Thanks
#2
Usually the humbucker will have 2 wires that are joined together and taped off. You need to add a switch that will ground those 2 wires, and that will split the pickup.
Generally stacked humbuckers aren't good split, because they are designed to have both coils on all the time, to cancel hum, so they sound best that way.
#3
Yeah stacked humbuckers when split don't sound that different from their normal operation. Usually they're designed to sound simply like an overwound single coil when both coils are on and an underwound single coil when they're split. It's not even as much of a difference as a true single coil being tapped is and it's certainly not as big of a difference between a full humbucker and a single coil. It'll also do nothing about the Telecaster twang since that's more to do with the construction of the guitar overall.

If you want a twang/no twang kind of deal, it would be better to go with Esquire style wiring where you just flick in an extra capacitor to instantly roll off the high-end and a little output, like a second, instant tone control. If you don't want to lose your neck pickup then you can drill a hole in the control plate for an on/on mini switch and add in additional capacitor switching that way. That will actually allow you to add in or take out the Tele twang properly, whereas splitting a stacked coil pickup will pretty much be just the same as turning the volume control down a little bit.
#5
I haven't actually played an esquire but, It was explained to me that esquires had a 3 way switch like normal teles but only one pickup that would allow you to boost/cut the highs/mids/lows
#6
Quote by grohl1987
Yeah stacked humbuckers when split don't sound that different from their normal operation. Usually they're designed to sound simply like an overwound single coil when both coils are on and an underwound single coil when they're split. It's not even as much of a difference as a true single coil being tapped is and it's certainly not as big of a difference between a full humbucker and a single coil. It'll also do nothing about the Telecaster twang since that's more to do with the construction of the guitar overall.

If you want a twang/no twang kind of deal, it would be better to go with Esquire style wiring where you just flick in an extra capacitor to instantly roll off the high-end and a little output, like a second, instant tone control. If you don't want to lose your neck pickup then you can drill a hole in the control plate for an on/on mini switch and add in additional capacitor switching that way. That will actually allow you to add in or take out the Tele twang properly, whereas splitting a stacked coil pickup will pretty much be just the same as turning the volume control down a little bit.


Thanks! I'm wondering if you could go more in depth to as how you build the guitar affects the twang? Is that like bridge/maple neck ect.?
#7
Quote by MellowMeadow
Thanks! I'm wondering if you could go more in depth to as how you build the guitar affects the twang? Is that like bridge/maple neck ect.?

I dont know if its 100% correct but I have been told that the twang came from the base plate size/material of the pickup. because a strat doesn't sound like a tele even if they are constructed out of the same materials.
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#8
Yeah, the main source of the Telecaster "twang" is the metal baseplate that the bridge pickups have and the large amount of metal that the bridge pickup is attached to, i.e. the bridge. Some people make a Strat sound like a Telecaster by adding a metal plate to the bottom of the bridge pickup and then changing the tremolo's sustain block for a stainless steel one. Telecasters basically have that set up by default. The scale length, body wood, neck/body joint and neck woods also play a large part in it. 25.5" scale is the standard scale for Telecasters and gives more "snap" than a Gibson 24.75" scale or PRS 25" scale. Most Telecasters are made of ash and most have maple necks, often with maple fingerboards too. Maple is pretty much the brightest-toned wood around, other than ebony. Ash is fairly bright too and although some Telecasters are made of alder, alder isn't too different from ash in terms of sound. Of course most Telecasters are bolt-on designs too and that also adds a lot of brightness, mostly to the neck pickup but it effects the bridge pickup a little bit too. Finally, Telecasters have more wood mass than Stratocasters and most other flat top guitars. Having that much solid wood means the treble frequencies are transmitted better, adding to the twang. This is why hollow body guitars have such a warm sound.

Lots of metal, bright woods and bright construction are what give Telecasters their tone. If you want twang it's great. If you want to kill the twang then you've got to take really drastic steps and it's very hard to make a Telecaster that can switch between twangy and not on the fly. Like I said before, doing some funky switching with extra capacitors to kill the treble of the guitar is the only real way to do it, though that also dulls the response of the guitar too. Some people say that using a Hot Rails and having a switch for series/parallel modes works, but I tried it and the parallel mode sounded more like a cheap Strat pickup than a Telecaster pickup of any kind, let alone a good one.