#1
You may know that I am a beginner. My questions at this point are kind of simple . How do you all switch from E major to G? There is nothing in common here. Which finger would you use as an anchor?
-Mike
#4
Quote by conor-figgy
As none of the fingering is common, there's no ''anchor''. Think about it.


Maybe anchor is the wrong word. I am thinking that it might be best to lead with the pinky because it is free and then do the acoustic slide...
-Mike
#5
Classical guitarists pay very close attention to these issues, so it definitely isn't an "anything goes" approach as someone suggested.

The best route would be to first move the middle finger from the B on the 5th string to the low G on the 6th string. Then move your index finger to the B on the 5th. As for the last notes, I'd then place the pinky on the 3rd fret of the high E, then if you want, put the ring finger on the 3rd fret B last.

Of course, this is assuming your start the G chord on a downstroke.
#6
Quote by Riffman15
Classical guitarists pay very close attention to these issues, so it definitely isn't an "anything goes" approach as someone suggested.

The best route would be to first move the middle finger from the B on the 5th string to the low G on the 6th string. Then move your index finger to the B on the 5th. As for the last notes, I'd then place the pinky on the 3rd fret of the high E, then if you want, put the ring finger on the 3rd fret B last.

Of course, this is assuming your start the G chord on a downstroke.


I think I know what you mean, although the description seems a little weird to me. Essentially, the route leads with the middle finger, followed by index..... In the long run, this is probably best because I think it allows me to keep my hand and wrist in a proper position. When I lead with my pinky, even though it is easier for me now due to habit, my hand/wrist end up in a odd position if that makes any sense.
-Mike
#7
Quote by WhiskeyFace
There aren't really any shortcuts. Just change from one chord to the other over and over again. Your fingers will get used to it.


^ This. If you try to do what someone else says then you're limiting yourself.
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#8
Originally thought this thread was about modulation....


TS: The way I finger the chords--E major with middle, ring and index fretting their respective strings-- keep your middle finger on the B, ring moves to the low G and pinky to the G on high E.

EDIT: It should also be noted that I am not a classically-trained guitarist and so I suspect that those who are would look down on the method I just stated.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


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try the sexolydian scale.
Last edited by jwd724 at Jun 6, 2011,
#9
If you were so inclined, you could use a barred G major, and use 2, 3, and 4 to finger the E major. Moving from EMaj to GMaj would keep 2, 3, and 4 in the same configuration, just shifted up the neck, and only require you to put down a barre.

If you want to use the open GMaj, one exercise my guitar teacher taught me is to very, very slowly move your fingers into place, hovering millimeters over the strings. Only once all the fingers are in their position do you put them down and strum the chord. Doing that many times - especially going from EMaj to GMaj, will help you automatically find the chord with your fingers without requiring an anchor.
#10
Quote by Widefingers
I think I know what you mean, although the description seems a little weird to me. Essentially, the route leads with the middle finger, followed by index..... In the long run, this is probably best because I think it allows me to keep my hand and wrist in a proper position. When I lead with my pinky, even though it is easier for me now due to habit, my hand/wrist end up in a odd position if that makes any sense.


The reason his description references the downstroke is that you want the first note you play to be ready first. If you start with the pinkie, you are taking time away from putting down the low G - the note you hit first on a downstroke. Ideally, you put all the fingers down at the exact same time, and everything is ready at once. If you can't have that, the next best thing is efficient placement of your fingers so that the delays work with, rather than against, how you play the chord.
#11
Yeah there's no shared fingers there. Just keep at it and i assure you, G to C will be much worse. xD
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#12
no Anchor. Repeat. No Anchor.
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#13
just practice it until you can swap quite quickly. some people say , move this finger here , move this finger there , i reckon just do whatever feels right to you
#14
Quote by Lennon993
Yeah there's no shared fingers there. Just keep at it and i assure you, G to C will be much worse. xD


Your are right! E to G is not so bad now. G to C is a bear
-Mike
#15
I would leave my middle finger anchored, throw the ring finger up to G,( third frett top string)
pinky third frett bottom string, pointer finger hovering. Doing it this way will help with finger inderpendance. cheers
#16
I usually play a modified G, muting the A string. Or just play a barre G.
Basically try to do it right and practice it, it's all finger muscle memory.
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