#1
I have an Alvarez guitar, not sure what model, it's quite new, the strings have not been changed from the ones they came with. Tonight I am trying to change them for the first time.

I'm still stuck on the low E string, I'm finding that when I start to tighten up the string the bridge pin is popping up a bunch, it won't stay low, fully seated, like the other strings I haven't removed yet. Is there some trick to this?

Also, in trying to figure out how to feed the strings through the tuner I've butchered the string, creased etc. is that a big deal? doesn't look nice.

Thanks this is frustrating!
#2
Just hold the pin down while pulling the string snug so that the stopper on the string is right against the pin. Try holding the pin down while tuning, also.

And no, it's not that big of a deal. At least it never was for me. Just looks ugly
#3
Been there bro and only recently did I find out how to do it. Slip the string inside the bridge hole, then slip the bridge pin. Make sure it locks in solid. That ought to get you good to go.

String creases can be a thing if they're absolutely FUBAR, but a something less than perfection is not to be worried about.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#4
An old trick is to slightly bend the string near the ball-end. That way, the end of the bridge pin won't catch on the ball. (Which is why the pin is pulling up)
The pin does not hold the string directly. The ball end catches on a piece of hardwood glued to the inside of the guitar called the bridge-plate. The bridge pin just keeps the string to one side so that the strain is taken on the bridge plate.
#5
You are falling into the same trap that most people fall into. The pins are not meant to hold the strings down, they are meant to push the ball end of the string forward so that the string will hook it's self under the breidgeplate of the guitar. If you have to physically hold the pin down then you are actually damaging your guitar.

Here is a link to the best string changing lesson I've ever seen

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/SteelStrings/Stringing/ststringing1.html
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