#1
So my guitar is one of those inexpensive Strat' clones that I'm sure you all know about known as the Bullet (don't laugh, I have a decent enough little amp and an ok distortion pedal so it's not like I'm completely lacking anything resembling respectable equipment*).

Along with loads of other things I'm having real trouble with getting my head/fingers around tapping technique(s). Particularly right-handed tapping. No matter what I do it just doesn't sound right. A nasty, "twang" tone as opposed to what it's supposed to sound like. I've heard about better guitars having strings that are lower to the fretboard; does this make any difference to how tapping should sound, or is it all down to my lack of ability?


*Actually, laugh if you want. I do.
Last edited by Raiden1982 at Jun 6, 2011,
#2
I think you'd be better of getting a new amp and a set up for your guitar.
Gear:
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Jack and Danny Brothers Ls-5
Ibanez Gsa 60
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Zoom g9.2tt (for sale (NL))
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Blackheart Little Giant
#3
You can raise or lower string height on any guitar, this is done at the bridge. It won't really change the sound unless it is substantially higher or lower to the pickups, However it will make playing a lot easier with the strings being closer to the fretboard. Just make sure that they aren't too low or they will buzz against the frets.
#4
although i didn't chuckle at the bullet strat , the supposedly semi-respectable other equipment did make me laugh (sorry, if you are a beginner it's fine). a better guitar probably would help. the pickups on bullets are total garbage so that is one problem. even with a proper setup the action on them is only acceptable but far from great. as for technique well that requires practice. i'd suggest turning off the distortion and playing them with a clean sound. any short comings in your technique will be real apparent using a clean setting.
#5
yeah.... upgrade your amp first... i'm gigging with my 22 year old squier strat. the thing sounds just fine.

as for your "twang" sound, work on your technique. and try doing it clean. do not use any overdrive at the beginning and try to make it sound like its fretted. when you get that, turn on the OD and see if there are any fine tuning changes you need to do. always practice new techniques cleanly first. overdrive covers up sloppy playing and you wont notice it
#6
This is one of those situations where I would recommend a guitar first. You're not trying to gig anywhere, so get a guitar that's going to make you want to practice and get better, THEN get a good amp.


The Bullet strats are very wobbly on the settings. Get a solid guitar that you can use for quite a while, and that feels comfortable.
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#7
Heh, so the guitar is apparently less of an issue than the sh*tty amp I've been using for years

As for the distortion, I don't use it all the time. I only turn it on when I just want to have some fun with a riff or two that I can play moderately well. For my more "serious" practice sessions I normally play with clean sound
#8
Quote by User_Name336
yeah.... upgrade your amp first... i'm gigging with my 22 year old squier strat. the thing sounds just fine.

as for your "twang" sound, work on your technique. and try doing it clean. do not use any overdrive at the beginning and try to make it sound like its fretted. when you get that, turn on the OD and see if there are any fine tuning changes you need to do. always practice new techniques cleanly first. overdrive covers up sloppy playing and you wont notice it

1,000,000% truth.
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And have you figured out yet -


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#9
Yeah, so it's my technique that needs working on. Doesn't surprise me

Look here. Not looking for bumps, it's just to give you an idea of what kind of stage I'm at (or not at).
#11
Quote by Woffelz
What you really need is a new amp...

Roland Cube?
This.

P.S.: SQUIER, not Squire.