#1
I have never really used it before, and I don't really care for Jazz much. From what I gathered it uses mode or scale names to describe note choices over chords, instead of thinking in a specific key. Do any of you use these theory in all genres you play? I am trying to see if it is better to use CST or just thinking in key outside of Jazz.
#2
Quote by ElConky
I have never really used it before, and I don't really care for Jazz much. From what I gathered it uses mode or scale names to describe note choices over chords, instead of thinking in a specific key. Do any of you use these theory in all genres you play? I am trying to see if it is better to use CST or just thinking in key outside of Jazz.



I wouldn't even use it for jazz.

IMO you're much better off being able to recognize keys & following common melodic practices.
shred is gaudy music
#3
Quote by GuitarMunky
I wouldn't even use it for jazz.

IMO you're much better off being able to recognize keys & following common melodic practices.


i share the same opinion. if you absolutely have to use it for jazz, make sure you know your theory first -- because that's how people come under the false impression that you solo using G dorian over Gm7, C mixolydian over C9, and F ionian over Fmaj7 in a progression that's clearly just a ii-V-I in F major.

i wouldn't use it outside of jazz unless you can already recognize keys instantly. i'm telling you - don't go near it until you're a wizard with fundamental theory.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
In jazz there are different approaches to soloing
1. chord tones / guide tones
2. CST
3. key center
4. Linear Jazz Improvisation (e.g. Ed Byrns)
5. only by ear

I'd have to say that the greatest number of jazzers will have a few of these approaches in their toolbox but will most likely use the chord tones/guide tones as this is the way to improvise bebop.

Linear Jazz Improvisation is also a very interesting technique where the melody is reduced to its essentials and then use these essentials melody notes as anchors of the improvisation. you know, the melody gives us lots of information regarding the connection with the harmony.

for some reason CST is very popular with guitar players, this may be the case because of the visual nature of the different modes shapes.
#5
Quote by jayx124
In jazz there are different approaches to soloing
1. chord tones / guide tones
2. CST
3. key center
4. Linear Jazz Improvisation (e.g. Ed Byrns)
5. only by ear

I'd have to say that the greatest number of jazzers will have a few of these approaches in their toolbox but will most likely use the chord tones/guide tones as this is the way to improvise bebop.

Linear Jazz Improvisation is also a very interesting technique where the melody is reduced to its essentials and then use these essentials melody notes as anchors of the improvisation. you know, the melody gives us lots of information regarding the connection with the harmony.

for some reason CST is very popular with guitar players, this may be the case because of the visual nature of the different modes shapes.


well the best way to improvise in MOST styles would incorporate hitting chord tones. Thats common melodic practice. Calling that an approach to soloing is like saying that "hitting strings" is an approach to playing guitar.

If you have a key center, and your thinking various scales over that key ( such as playing dorian - mixo - ionian over a ii V I).... you simply misunderstand what's going on.

jazz tunes do have alot of key changes and colorful chords, but the genre still draws from the same resources as the music that came before it. In terms of melody and soloing....It still uses common melodic practices.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 6, 2011,
#6
Quote by jayx124
for some reason CST is very popular with guitar players, this may be the case because of the visual nature of the different modes shapes.


CST is popular with guitar players because they don't have to know anything. all they have to know is a few shapes. so don't "for some reason" me. it's pretty obvious. and the guy who came up with this knew what he was doing.

once you know enough theory that you don't need to use CST, you realize just how much of a crock it is.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.