#1
If so, how?
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#2
in my opinium not, you might have to increase the volume of the amp. To me its just the same
#3
I don't know since I've only played inside,or a garage with the door open if that counts...
I'd imagine the only real differences would be dealing with the lighting(the time of day plays a big part in that I'd imagine); dealing with the wind(it seems to enjoy distorting my sound); and getting the sound and volume at the levels you want.
So pretty much just the weather since every gig I've been to has been a pain in the ass to set the levels up to sound the way we wanted it to.
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#4
Increase volume
Prepare your gear for outdoor conditions, such as heat.

When you get to the venue, leave your guitar in the case on stage for 1/2 hour, then take it out and put it on a stand for half hour to help your guitar acclimatize to the conditions.
Also, tune, stretch strings then repeat to increase tuning stability. Metal expands in heat. Damn those vibrating particles.
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#5
Not really - Unless you're the sound guy, then it's a totally different kettle of fish.

The major difference is the type of event - are people there for a gig or are you a backing band?
e.g. last week I teched 2 indoor and 1 outdoor event. The outdoor was a gig so people were there for the music. One of the indoors was a gig, one was a beer festival. At the beer fest the band were much quieter, playing more covers and expecting fewer people to actually be listening - long instrumentals were pretty acceptable - one of the bands had a near 2 hr set and just jammed the whole thing which was cool as they were quite good and noone listened too hard. At a gig where people are "watching" that's not cool.
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#6
I like outdoor gigs more, just the vibe I guess. Other than that I mean a gig is a gig. Outdoor gigs seem to be more for events, parties, festivals, etc. and indoor could be more for people coming to see a certain band.
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#7
People are forgetting that sound changes heaps in an outdoor gig compared to an indoor.

Think about it. In an indoor gig, sound will reflect against the walls and bounce back. Also factor in the fact that there will be a lesser effect that sponges will have with outdoor gigs, unless youre playing to thousands and thousands of people.
#8
Quote by Arterial
People are forgetting that sound changes heaps in an outdoor gig compared to an indoor.

Think about it. In an indoor gig, sound will reflect against the walls and bounce back. Also factor in the fact that there will be a lesser effect that sponges will have with outdoor gigs, unless youre playing to thousands and thousands of people.


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#10
Bigger amp for sure. Absolutely need at least a 4x12 to carry the sound. Very easy for a small amp to get lost in the sound at an outdoor gig. Prepare for rain. Tarps and trash bags. You do not want your stuff sitting outside if a quick moving storm comes in.
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#11
Quote by Air_Vengeance
Bigger amp for sure. Absolutely need at least a 4x12 to carry the sound. Very easy for a small amp to get lost in the sound at an outdoor gig. Prepare for rain. Tarps and trash bags. You do not want your stuff sitting outside if a quick moving storm comes in.


an outdoor gig can be played without huge amps. a decent PA and a good soundman will have a far greater effect. in an outdoor environment the PA should be doing the work not your stage equipment. as mentioned the way sound behaves is different outdoors. and yeah make sure that your equipment is protected from the elements as much as possible.
#12
it depends on how big an outdoor gig.

certainly, a bigger outdoor gig is going to require way more power out of the PA system (no, your amp power doesn't matter here) because there is no way to contain the sound. thats the sound guys issue though. if, however, you don't have a sound guy or the gig isn't big enough to warrant a bigger PA system, you'll definitely have to be a little bit louder than usual.

also, prepare for weather. have rain covers for everything. stop play and get your stuff off the stage to somewhere dry (or at least unplug stuff) as soon as its starting to rain
#13
If you use an open back speaker cab/combo, yes it's different. You'll need to increase your mids a little bit. If you use a closed back speaker cab/combo, no it's not different. The sound techs should know what to do with your gear and be able to help you set it up for the best sound either way.