#1
Okay, so I am currently using "The Total Funk Bassist" by Dave Overthrow to improve my playing and technique, and obviously become better at playing funk.

However, I decided just to work through the book fdrom start to finish to see if I can fill in any gaps of theory or playing knowledge.
Now I do have some prior theory knowledge and when I got onto the section entitled "Scales, Intervals and Modes" (Chapter 3) I was a little wary.

It then went on to describe modes as;
"A mode is a 'reordering' of notes from a scale. Each tone of the major scale is the starting note for a different mode...When you play any major scale starting and ending on the tonic , you can think of it as the first mode of the scale. When you play and major scale starting and ending o the 2nd degree, you can think of it as the second mode of that scale, and so on.

"The most commonly used chord in funk is the dominant 7 chord. The 'chord scale' used to play bass lines over the dominant 7th chord is the Mixolydian mode."

Now my question is this. My understanding of modes is that they are not just "reordeings of major scales" but infact using the same notes as a given major scale but emphasising a different root note and tonic, and used much more than just improvising over certain chords. As that would still be tonal and not modal, depending on the key of the song.
However, the book suggests that you can use modes within a tonal song over varying chords.
This confused me really and at the moment I'm choosing to ignore this part of the book, but am I right to do so, or shold I go along with what it is saying?


Also, on a slight side note its details the melodic minor as;
1 2 b3 4 5 #6 #7 only.
I've not really looked into this scale, but I have read in a few places that this scale changes if you are acsending or decending (The book mentions nothing of this). Could someonep laese clear this up.

Thanks in advance!
#2
What the book is talking about is a pretty common interpretation of modes, one that I am pretty indifferent to. A lot of people around here have problems with it because it's not technically "modal" it's just using modes and scale shapes as a way to think of playing over chords.

Also, in all practicality that is the melodic minor scale, sometimes called the jazz minor scale. Unless you're studying four part harmony, when you use melodic minor you're typically using it as a sound, not always functionally. You will often only think of it ascending, because descending it is the same as natural minor.
#4
Also, on a slight side note its details the melodic minor as;
1 2 b3 4 5 #6 #7 only.
I've not really looked into this scale, but I have read in a few places that this scale changes if you are acsending or decending (The book mentions nothing of this). Could someonep laese clear this up.


yeah its confusing...

the melodic minor..also called the jazz minor...in a more traditional-classical-setting will acsend as you noted and desend as a natural minor...but today most players use it the same acsending & desending
#6
Actually I see no harm in what the guy was getting across. In other words, being funk, you are going to concentrate on hitting the b7... in major... hence mixolydian. What zen is saying is that this seems to only worry guitarists and bassists... well, not at all. It's perfectly legit as to what the author is saying, and the style which he is going into depth with, yada yada yada. There aint much funk with major 7ths. Nor a lot of blues with major 7ths for that matter.. nor a lot of country. All would work equally well with said mixolydian scale. Minors would do well with the Dorian... 2nd closest minor scale to sounding major (excluding the melodic minor of course... which is the closest... but 2 notes further away from the dominant... although you can find a dominant shape lurking within it).

So I get what the guy is saying... people will find fault with everything perhaps, until they hit those genres and find out for themselves. It is re-ordered notes... and it is a "chord scale" he mentions... hence, it is correct. As for the melodic minor... play it fixed... that way you retain the sound you want... it doesn't really have to revert back to the natural...

So zen... describe what legato actually is... Fluid right? Hammers, pulls, slides... anything that actually doesn't give an attack to the note but creates a fluid movement... other than that, I don't know... so what is it really?

As far as I know with wind players... it would be a series of notes played in one breath. On piano I have no idea, unless its when that soft pedal is depressed to minimize an attack on notes. Violinists manage many feats foreign to us guitarists... but it would be the bow stroke once again... and depending on how good their technique is, they can get the same fluidity between notes using alternating strokes... hence super long lines played by them... or so korsakov mentioned. Percussion, I have absolutely no idea about... i don't know if they can have legato.... anyway, still stumped... so please explain...
Last edited by evolucian at Jun 7, 2011,
#7
Quote by evolucian
Actually I see no harm in what the guy was getting across. In other words, being funk, you are going to concentrate on hitting the b7... in major... hence mixolydian. What zen is saying is that this seems to only worry guitarists and bassists... well, not at all. It's perfectly legit as to what the author is saying, and the style which he is going into depth with, yada yada yada. There aint much funk with major 7ths. Nor a lot of blues with major 7ths for that matter.. nor a lot of country. All would work equally well with said mixolydian scale. Minors would do well with the Dorian... 2nd closest minor scale to sounding major (excluding the melodic minor of course... which is the closest... but 2 notes further away from the dominant... although you can find a dominant shape lurking within it).

So I get what the guy is saying... people will find fault with everything perhaps, until they hit those genres and find out for themselves. It is re-ordered notes... and it is a "chord scale" he mentions... hence, it is correct. As for the melodic minor... play it fixed... that way you retain the sound you want... it doesn't really have to revert back to the natural...

So zen... describe what legato actually is... Fluid right? Hammers, pulls, slides... anything that actually doesn't give an attack to the note but creates a fluid movement... other than that, I don't know... so what is it really?


Well said... I agree.

Personally I think both are right... just two diffrent view points of the same thing. IMO neither is right or wrong, simply two diffrent interpretations of the same information.

Kind of like how I refer to a Ab, but my freind calls it a G#, its the same damn note... just two diffrent ways of interpreting the same info.
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.