#2
Depends entirely what you mean by "explain pentatonics", that's not exactly very specific...
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#3
They are scales that consist of five notes.

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#4
Like what are the notes in one of them, or what are the intervals, major or minor, what are you wanting to know?
#6
Whether or not the pattern changes isn't really relevant to your understanding of scales.

A scale is a sequence of NOTES following a particular pattern of intervals, for example E minor pentatonic is the notes E G A B D. Play those notes on ANY instrument and you've jusr played through that scale, it just so happens that there's lots of places to play those notes on a guitar. That's all the "pattern" is, just all the places those notes appear - the notes and intervals are the scale, they're what define it. The patterns are just a quirk of the guitar and will help you find your way around on that particular instrument.
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#7
^^ exactly.

To show the scale easily i like to refer to the major scale.

so if we work from A we have : ..... A B C# D E F# G#.
..................................................1 2. 3.. 4. 5 6... 7 .......This is the A major scale.

A Minor Pentatonic relates
like this :........................................A C D E G.
...................................................1 .b3 4 5 .b7 ..... This is Am Pentatonic scale.


The patterns that are taught are as seagull stated, they just happen to be where all these notes are located. They are broken down into "patterns / positions" to be easier to teach/learn. Many guitarist do not know the notes they are playing or the "why" which is what your asking
Last edited by ToXyN at Jun 7, 2011,
#9
R b3 4 5 b7

Those are the intervals
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#10
i showed with the numbers under the notes, yes they are the same intervals for each key.
#12
Quote by GS LEAD 5
So its 1 step, 3 steps,4 steps, 5 steps and then 7 step?


No, the formula is: 1 b3 4 5 b7
That means root note, minor third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, minor seventh.
Minor 3rd: three half steps
Perfect fourth: five half steps
Perfect fifth: seven half steps
minor seventh: 10 half steps
#14
Root.

If you look at pattern 1 in Am.. you have these notes.

5th fret low E string = A.........This is the Root.

8th Fret low E string = C........This is the b3.....3 half steps higher.

5th fret A string = D...........This is the 4th........5 half steps from root.

7th fret A string = E...............this is the 5th......7 half steps from root.

5th fret D string = G.............this is the b7.........10 half steps from root.

7th fret D string = A..............Root, an octave Higher.. the scale repeats with the same notes, but the location of the notes change, so you need to have different patterns as you move up or down the fret board.

If you hadn't already, i would step back to chromatic / major / Minor scales and make sure you have a good understanding of them first.