#1
I'm starting to teach guitar and need to recruit some students.
Will this work for sites like Facebook and social networking?
What about leaflets in local stores?


Note: Picture is from Google. I do not own this.

Suggestions will be taken in consideration since I have no experience
in such.
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 7, 2011,
#3
I would say so, mainly the leaflets though. But mostly I recommend posting loads of ads online. There are lots of sites for this and a lot of them are free. Advertise in local ones, and local sections of national ones. You could also put an ad in the local paper.
#4
Both. Leaflets are very important.

On facebook, you may not hear about it, but everyone will know that you are teaching, so you might get lucky.
You want some more seeneyj hate? WELL YOU CAN'T HAVE IT

You're all a bunch of f*cking slaves! - Jim Morrison

UG Awards
1st: Biggest Ego
1st: Most Likely To Become Famous
1st: Most Pretentious User
#5
Quote by Sean0913
No. I don't think so.

Thanks for being positive, Sean.

Quote by jkielq91
I would say so, mainly the leaflets though. But mostly I recommend posting loads of ads online. You could also put an ad in the local paper.


I'd agree. Definitely Craigslist and the local newspapers.

Quote by seeneyj
Both. Leaflets are very important.
On facebook, you may not hear about it, but everyone will know that you are teaching, so you might get lucky.


I need to get the pull tab ones to put my phone number on.
Hopefully. If someone knows people wanting to be taught, they'll refer them to me.
#6
Quote by blakeg14
Thanks for being positive, Sean.


I'd agree. Definitely Craigslist and the local newspapers.


I need to get the pull tab ones to put my phone number on.
Hopefully. If someone knows people wanting to be taught, they'll refer them to me.


Exactly. After working as a sales consultant for my years, about half of your business is from referrals. Sometimes even more
You want some more seeneyj hate? WELL YOU CAN'T HAVE IT

You're all a bunch of f*cking slaves! - Jim Morrison

UG Awards
1st: Biggest Ego
1st: Most Likely To Become Famous
1st: Most Pretentious User
#7
Quote by blakeg14
Thanks for being positive, Sean.



You asked a question, "Will this work for sites like Facebook and social networking?
What about leaflets in local stores?"
and now you roll your eyes at me? I thought you wanted opinions and feedback, I wasn't aware that I needed to tell you what you wanted to hear. Do the others here that responded actually "teach" anyone? I am a teacher. You want to throw out my thoughts go for it.

You may need to re-examine what you're trying to do. I should just not respond and just leave you to sink, since clearly you weren't looking for what you were asking, you wanted consensus with your idea. Well good luck, I'm not known for being anything other than a straight shooter (sometimes it gets me labeled a jerk, because I shoot straight, but by and large, most people eventually get what I'm about and why I answer how I do.)

Best,

Sean
#8
Quote by seeneyj
Exactly. After working as a sales consultant for my years, about half of your business is from referrals. Sometimes even more


That's exactly what I need to hear! I'm new to this, so ideas are just springing up as I go.

Quote by Sean0913
You asked a question, "Will this work for sites like Facebook and social networking?
Do the others here that responded actually "teach" anyone? I am a teacher.


I wouldn't know if the others teach, I didn't ask. I meant to ask for marketing advice,
if you didn't see what I was trying to get advice on. What's your advice on recruiting
students? THAT is what I was trying to say.

Also, the 'rolling eyes' gesture was supposed to imply sarcasm. Your comment seemed
Snarky, which is why I replied sarcastically. Some users do that and most of the time,
I see it as spam. Wouldn't have known you were a teacher had it not been for the
signature.
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 8, 2011,
#9
Quote by blakeg14
I wouldn't know if the others teach, I didn't ask. This is clearly marketing advice I
was asking for.


Sean actually runs a very successful guitar teaching clinic that has been featured on local tv stations and he has won awards for.

Perhaps it would be a good idea to ask him for better or alternative approaches to marketing?

Edit: You quickly edited and rendered my point irrelevant
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by AlanHB
Sean actually runs a very successful guitar teaching clinic that has been featured on local tv stations and he has won awards for.

Perhaps it would be a good idea to ask him for better or alternative approaches to marketing?


That's great. I just don't like the blunt answers. Maybe I wasn't clear, but that
WAS what I tried to say..

Edit: Just realized that just now..after I replied.
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 7, 2011,
#11
Quote by blakeg14
That's great. I just don't like the blunt answers. Maybe I wasn't clear, but that
WAS what I tried to say..

Edit: Just realized that just now..after I replied.


One drawback I can see to Facebook advertising is that you wouldn't necessarily be appealing to your target market, the ad will be right next to an ad for a dating agency. It will also most likely be advertised well outside your geographic market (where you live). It is also hideously expensive (you pay Facebook around $1.08 every time somebody clicks on your link).

Just ask yourself - would you seek out lessons from a Facebook ad?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#12
Quote by AlanHB
One drawback I can see to Facebook advertising is that you wouldn't necessarily be appealing to your target market, the ad will be right next to an ad for a dating agency. It will also most likely be advertised well outside your geographic market (where you live). It is also hideously expensive (you pay Facebook around $1.08 every time somebody clicks on your link).

Just ask yourself - would you seek out lessons from a Facebook ad?


Good point.. I didn't see it costs so much, until I scrolled down.
There would be absolutely no benefit. It would be money down th drain.
Honestly, my geographic market is limited to my town only, so it's
a pain..can't expand because I don't have a car, nor money for insurance.
Just put a status up (which seems to disappear quickly due to others
Excessive posting). All I can do is spread the word. So far, a few comments,
as expected.I know some places that might give my marketing a chance:
Family Clinic, Save-A-Lot, Country Kitchen, the library, Italian Bistro,
Los Portales, El Ranchitos, Walmart, and Maxwell's Grocery. The reason being,
I know the owners and the places are usually loaded with customers. Most
HAVE community boards where the locals post ads.

So far, the people that wanted lessons can't have them at the moment.
One family member is sick with mono, so family members
3 to-be students post-poned,1 refuses to contact me back,
1 was cancelled due to traveling distance being 17 miles,
and 1 said he doesn't have the money...
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 7, 2011,
#13
If your town has all those things, I think there would be a decent population around to get students from.

Otherwise I'll just go with whatever Sean says - I have no experience in advertising.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by AlanHB
If your town has all those things, I think there would be a decent population around to get students from.

Otherwise I'll just go with whatever Sean says - I have no experience in advertising.


Indeed. It's just the fact that the student has to have a guitar of their own since I'm left-handed,
They must be willing to pay, willing to learn, must be between ages 10-18 (some exceptions),
And they need to feel comfortable with me being in their home (it wouldn't make much sense
teaching outside in 100° weather).

Sure. Seeneyj stated he has sales experience, so he seems to be one to listen to as well.
#15
Quote by blakeg14
Indeed. It's just the fact that the student has to have a guitar of their own since I'm left-handed,
They must be willing to pay, willing to learn, must be between ages 10-18 (some exceptions),
And they need to feel comfortable with me being in their home (it wouldn't make much sense
teaching outside in 100° weather).

Sure. Seeneyj stated he has sales experience, so he seems to be one to listen to as well.

why did you select your age range to be 10-18? that's going to eliminate a ton of potential students...
#16
i like that you are asking a question with your advert. but here is where i think you could improve.
Ive seen so many guitar websites each with thier own strengths and weaknesses.but as a general rule the tutor tries to convince you how great they are.
people have delicate ego's so if you can make a person feel good about themselves you are halfway there.
how about for your slogan: "you can be the guitar hero ..."
#17
Indeed. It's just the fact that the student has to have a guitar of their own since I'm left-handed,
They must be willing to pay, willing to learn, must be between ages 10-18 (some exceptions),
And they need to feel comfortable with me being in their home (it wouldn't make much sense
teaching outside in 100° weather).

left or right handed player welcomes,(learn from a lefty! )
lesson to your doorstep, with lessons from $290.00 all you need is the will to learn and i will take care of the rest !
#18
Quote by -TM-
why did you select your age range to be 10-18? that's going to eliminate a ton of potential students...

this^ I wouldn't limit the age group so much...... maybe 10 and up would work
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#19
I'm sure you're a sincere and well-meaning good guy, so what I am about to say may seem or sound harsh, and it's really not meant to, just honest. I have no doubt that you're on the right track, but please consider what I am trying to say below, because I'm not trying to be mean or hateful or hurtful in any way, but I have to be straight with you. Fair enough?

OK Blake, I'll give you my 2 cents.

Using a picture you used from Google (which by the way is rights-managed by Getty Images, and you could easily get sued - do your homework, you cannot just use any picture you find with impunity) and a hard-to-read font with your name obscured is not effective advertising, nor does it communicate anything concerning the tangible benefits and features they should get if they DO consider learning from you. You've done NOTHING to give them any tangible reason to call you. You teach guitar? Welcome to the club, stand in line with a million others who claim to do the same. On Facebook you run the risk of being associated with the play blues guitar in 5 minutes, or the Jamorama series, or just about every other mass marketing operation, and you fail at presenting yourself any better than they do.

It's not my job, obligation or responsibility to give you marketing advice. You asked if it would work and I said no. When starting out a business, such as teaching, you need to make sure you have a strong understanding of what you bring to the table and why should someone come to YOU as opposed to anyone else. What makes you think you are WORTH the money someone would spend on you? Then, communicate that in as direct a way as possible. Your demographic is wayyyy off as well.

Look mate...if you want to be taken seriously, do your own homework, research the need, research who it is you are trying to reach and study up on how to market in an honest and honorable way...I hate hype to my bones, because if it needs to be hyped it isnt what you hope it will be.

I prefer being direct and unwavering in my commitment to the student. If anything I undersell what I do. As Alan said, I have been nationally recognized, and to date am the only Guitar Program in our states history to ever receive an award. I don't think I've ever mentioned or promoted that here, or in my sig. The only way you'd know that, is to visit our site. I tend to just let people learn for themselves what we are and what we are not, because what's inside that site is REAL. I don't have to prove it. The reason I can do this, is because I know what I have to offer compared to everyone else.

My students locally came through word of mouth. In my opinion you get there by reputation. If you are an amazing player in a local band, and people know of you, and then you start giving lessons, now people have something to go by. If you pop up out of the blue, and no one really knows you, and you don't understand people's core needs and motivations, for learning the guitar, and cannot tap into those needs in such a way as to sincerely have a plan to meet those needs, then you have a long ways to go before you're ready to teach. Prove yourself by taking on 2 students and show the world what you can do with them. People's dreams are important and if you don't think you can honestly and measurably handle those needs, then don't teach. They deserve better.

This is primarily WHY I didn't give you "advice" because I don't want to enable someone that may or may not be ready or even KNOW what it is to teach, and leave those out there wanting to learn, who don't know better, at the mercy of your skills and knowledge and preparation. I'm not saying that to be offensive to you or put you down, but because I'm passionate about teaching guitar and equally passionate about people who want to learn guitar not wasting their money on the wrong person, because I have what its like. If you were someone that I recognized and respected from here, and could tell that you knew your stuff, then I'd bend over backwards to help.

In contrast, I have a friend on UG, who goes by evolucian. He and I are good friends, primarily gained from mutual respect on here, and I have given him feedback on his teaching method, and marketing advice. Not only that, but he and I have been collaborating on a teaching series, regarding a new approach to improvisation for more than a year. We became friends through respect. The same way would be if anyone else here that I know and respect came to me, like if Diminished 5th suddenly came to me wanting business advice, or Griff, or anyone here that I have seen helping people carefully and showing consideration towards.

I haven't seen you help anyone here ever, so I can't give the same wholesale support that I would others here that I do see as helpful and knowledgeable, and sincere. I haven't seen your passion for helping and teaching others here once.

I could do a search to make sure, but having to do that should indicate, you're not as measurable or memorable as say Venice King, who frequently undersells his importance to this community but consistently solidly helps others. Does what I'm saying make sense here?

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 8, 2011,
#20
Quote by blakeg14
I'm starting to teach guitar and need to recruit some students.
Will this work for sites like Facebook and social networking?
What about leaflets in local stores?


Note: Picture is from Google. I do not own this.

Suggestions will be taken in consideration since I have no experience
in such.


From what I've read, you're not ready to teach, at least not to teach and get paid for it.

Your worry about marketing is premature, you haven't even adequately defined the product yet...
#21
@krypticguitar87:

I didn't think younger students would put in the effort. Seeing that I'm under 18, wouldn't
it make sense? The only exceptions to those over 18 are if they're: family, friend of family (or at least acquainted), referral from a friend..

@ibanez1511:

You have good ideas. You're saying it should be catchy, like a hook so that
the reader (potential client) is instantly interested in lessons.

@Sean0913:

I'm going to start using stocks from DeviantArt with permission from the artists then,
so there are no copyright issues. Yes, I see the font is hard to read, also from an artist's
standpoint, it should be brighter to 'catch the eye', right? That's very true, don't have
a response to that, other than those are actual companies that are more likely to attract
students all over the nation as apposed to just locals.

True. I have played at football games and school concerts. Nearly everyone has heard
me play. Honestly, 5 people asked ME for lessons. They know I'm left-handed, so the
mirror-effect comes in to play when I teach (which is how I learned so fast).
On "demograpics", I have stated my limitations..

The people that have asked me to teach them trust me to deliver want they need because they have seen me perform. They know I can read music, improv solos, memorize whole songs, play by ear, etc. They are close enough to be comfortable
around me and desire to learn from me.
I realize you have this prestigious guitar tutoring service, which is why I NEED your
help. It isn't your job to help me, I understand. It's the fact that you are helping me
with your own free will, and I really appreciate that.

Research is the key, I suppose. I've been writing down things to teach and marketing
things over the past few weeks. I see what you're getting at, but I HAVE taught musically experienced kids how to play guitar. It was much easier with them having some experience. We had some laughs, I told them what they did wrong, and they corrected themselves quickly. It was stunning. After 30 minutes, one could play in rhythm while switching between 4 chords he just learned. He kept practicing. 2 of the classmates are my to-be students.
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 8, 2011,
#22
Why teach just 10-18 year olds? Wouldn't it be a good idea to cater to older people too? They'll probably be more receptive to what you tell them and won't cancel because mummy didn't give them $20.
Last edited by Calibos at Jun 8, 2011,
#23
Quote by Calibos
Why teach just 10-18 year olds? Wouldn't it be a good idea to cater to older people too? They'll probably be more receptive to what you tell them and won't cancel because mummy didn't give them $20.



Originally Posted by krypticguitar87
this^ I wouldn't limit the age group so much...... maybe 10 and up would work

I didn't think younger students would put in the effort. Seeing that I'm under 18, wouldn't
it make sense? The only exceptions to those over 18 are if they're: family, friend of family (or at least acquainted), referral from a friend..
#24
Start with 2-3 people then and build your teaching chops effectively. Instead of planning a whole series of lessons, plan a nice solid 2-3 month course, and measure and evaluate your success with it. In the first month and a half, if it looks good (6 lessons worth) then build another month (month 4) anticipating their response. Figure out a few things that you can do well at teaching, match those things to those who want/need this, and start with 2-3. Then take the lessons you have learned as a teacher and apply those to your marketing strategy.

Honestly, I wouldn't call my Academy "prestigious" as it's more "underground". If you weren't local to my area, or on this forum, or didn't have a friend enrolled in it, chances are, you would not have heard of it. I don't market my Academy on Google, or do any other kinds of Facebook Marketing etc. I don't use Adwords or Adsense. Even online I get students through word of mouth, which is cool because I have never asked a single student here on UG to "promote" me. They spread the news through their own free will.

But that said, don't overlook the comment I made about helping others here. I think you can learn a lot through learning how to break things down and encourage others needing help. I am not a fan of just telling people the answers, but I encourage them/mentor them to find answers and give them a nudge in the right direction. This isn't me being stingy, its just helping them progress in a way thats more personally relevant and meaningful to them. I also get paid to teach a lot of what I would/could say, so it would create an ethical squeeze in me to turn around and give it away to whomever asks, so I have to measure my responses appropriately. Once they are my student though, I can go into a lot more detail when they come to me. In your case though, you might be able to go into more detail helping people.

Last of all, I want to compliment you on how you have taken people's comments; it shows you are teachable, yourself. That's a very important thing to have as a teacher, because we arent always right, and if we get it in our heads that we are always right, we lose valuable opportunities to learn as well. Sometimes we need more help than those we teach. I learned that many many years ago. I appreciate the spirit in which you've responded to comments here (notwithstanding the eyeroll, I'll pretend I didn't see that one!).

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 8, 2011,
#25
Quote by blakeg14

I didn't think younger students would put in the effort. Seeing that I'm under 18, wouldn't
it make sense? The only exceptions to those over 18 are if they're: family, friend of family (or at least acquainted), referral from a friend..

its not about younger kids but people older than 18. someone can start learning after they turn 18 man and to decide that you wont teach them unless they are family is ridiculous....

there are plenty of teachers that wont teach under the age of ten but you would be the first I've known of that wont teach people older than a certian age....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#26
@Sean0913:

That makes sense. Having little experience, working out the kinks/bugs/glitches (whatever you want to call them) first is probably the most important thing.

Okay, not exactly "prestigious".. Great or awesome is what I meant.. I was trying
to say, your academy is successful, so I could learn a thing or two from what you
have to say. I forgot I read the "word of mouth" in your other response.

I helped quite a few requesting chords here on UG. One, I explained everything and
he said he would pay me to teach him. I can't because he lives in Australia, but
it's the thought that counts.

By "more detail" are you talking about the theory behind everything and how
music works? That's what I don't want to teach someone just starting because
they will get bored quickly and may not be able to grasp the concepts. They just
want to play, ya know?

Thank you. I think communication is one of the most important things in teaching.
If I can't get a point across to someone on a forum, how am I supposed to teach?
Listening is part of communication also. Teaching is one big learning experience and
playing guitar is as well. All the comments on this thread are taken into consideration,
as stated in my first post.

@krypticguitar87:

Look, I would be uncomfortable teaching someone older in their home, especially
if I don't know them. As a beginner teacher, I see it fit to teach those in my age group,
the TEENS. Yes, I'm losing potential clients that way, but my parents would not be
comfortable with the idea either UNLESS they are acquainted. There should be at least
one appointment in which my parents meet the older client and spend some time getting
to know them. A background check would be nice. My parents aren't going to drop me
with my $400 equipment off at some unknown person's house that is over 18 yrs, it's
just absurd. You don't see some kind of supervision necessary? If you only knew the
violence that goes on in this town..


Quote by Arby911
From what I've read, you're not ready to teach, at least not to teach and get paid for it.
Your worry about marketing is premature, you haven't even adequately defined the product yet...


Please read a little more.
I might be able to agree with you there.
The product is obviously guitar lessons, but I'm sure you mean what makes me different from the other teachers?
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 8, 2011,
#28
Quote by Calibos
How old are you?


Just turned 17..I know what you're going to say next. >.>"
...leave me alone about the age thing please. I made
enough comments on the subject. This is for to make
A little money while mostly gaining teaching experience.
This isn't a buisness, it's a side-job.
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 8, 2011,
#30
Quote by blakeg14
@Sean0913:
By "more detail" are you talking about the theory behind everything and how
music works?


No. You answered your own question below, brilliantly, I think.

Quote by blakeg14

I think communication is one of the most important things in teaching.
If I can't get a point across to someone on a forum, how am I supposed to teach?


It's not theory, it's just learning in general how to break something down so that others can benefit from it. As I said, I give more of a nudge and push, when it comes to forum posts, than I do explaining things most of the time. You don't have to do that, because you don't have a lot of students that you are obligated towards, that pay you for the access to the same level of detail and personalized information, as I do.

Does that make sense? I have a means of navigating the entire guitar, let's call it "X" for short. A guy pays me and invests in learning "X".

Later a different guy comes on this forum asking for something, or posting a frustration, that I know beyond a shadow of a doubt, that the answer I have, would forever erase his confusion. And that answer happens to be "X". Do I just post and say, "hey, I know the solution, it's "X"." I can't do that, otherwise why should I ethically accept money from the first guy who's shown he's ready to commit to learning "X"? That would be disingenuous, especially if "X" isn't taught everywhere else. If it is common knowledge and I've just repackaged it, then that's not as much a problem, as it's not "exclusive".

So all I can do, is say "Hey here's what you can do to find the answer...". Then its up to them to decide if its worth it to them, if they are willing to personally invest and commit to the process etc. Thats basically what my sig is for. At least they know they have an option now, whether for now or in the future after they've spun their wheels long enough to decide if its worth a shot or not. That decision to act and say, here, I'm willing to invest in this....now teach me, is the first step that shows they are ready. It makes no sense to teach those who aren't ready for it.

The reason I decided to mentor, was because I wanted to help more people with their issues, but again, I don't teach them, I just give them advise, and direction...it works because they have to do their own seeking and that's their "work" into the process. What happens, is those that are serious go out and do the work and that breakthrough comes about.

A word of advise, don't be willing to teach someone that's not willing to pay for it. The reason is, that if they have nothing invested in it, then that usually will carry over to how they also practice, and commit to getting the most out of it. That which costs nothing, in this kind of context, is worth nothing.

I have had well to do parents show up to my Guitar School in their Range Rover, check book in hand with their privileged offspring wanting guitar lessons because its the flavor of their week.

I've sent many of them walking because they were unwilling to ask their child commit to earning half of their tuition. I saw nothing in the child that showed they were serious, and if a kid wants something bad enough, I know they will invest. It may mean helping Grandpa clean out the garage, or mowing their yard, but something that COSTS them is the glue/key to their success. That which costs nothing is worth nothing, and I refuse to teach along those lines no matter how much they throw at me. A lot of people are surprised when they see first hand how I turn people away, but, for those who do commit to the process, no words are necessary to explain myself. They get it.

You see, the secret to learning is inside your student. I/we just create the pathway, but if they don't follow it, what good am I or you or anyone else, that is there to show the way?

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 8, 2011,
#31
Quote by blakeg14

The product is obviously guitar lessons, but I'm sure you mean what makes me different from the other teachers?


Only partly. "Guitar Lessons" is overbroad at best. Can I come to you for Spanish Classical Guitar lessons? Jazz? Blues? Drop-Q Death Metal? Can you teach me to sight read? Solo in "X" over "Y" scale/chord/progression? Musical Theory? ( Or insert any of hundreds of other things one might want to learn...)

I'm not saying you have to be able to do all of these, you might only do a very small subset, but your customers need to know exactly what that can expect from you.
#32
@Arby911:

It's really up to the individual. Most of them just want to learn so pop songs may work best.
In another thread, we discussed this. Blues, pop, country, punk, classic rock, alternative,
Some metal, hard rock, grunge, ska, blah blah and so on and so forth. The majority won't know what
Jazz or Classical sounds like, so it wouldn't hurt to introduce them to the different genres.


@Sean0913:
Oh, alright.

Ah, I see.

That makes perfect sense. One has came up to me asking for free lessons and I turned him down.
He said, "but we're family?" And I replied, "yeah, but people already offered to pay. If I taught you
For free, how would that be fair?" Besides three family members offered to pay. The guy that
Asked me for free lessons had just gone through an 18 week class of my old band teacher teaching him
For free And it was like he hadn't learned a single thingle thing.

Exactly. Hard work and commitment to something you love equals profit in some way.

Words to live by!
Last edited by blakeg14 at Jun 8, 2011,
#33
My guitar teacher was 17, and he taught mainly younger kids and young adults, but some older folks too. The age really doesn't matter, your maturity, and ability to teach does though. Advertising is important as far as getting your name out there but if you can't teach for shit people won't like you no matter how much you spent promoting yourself.
#34
Quote by ElConky
My guitar teacher was 17, and he taught mainly younger kids and young adults, but some older folks too. The age really doesn't matter, your maturity, and ability to teach does though. Advertising is important as far as getting your name out there but if you can't teach for shit people won't like you no matter how much you spent promoting yourself.


That's why when I do start teaching it's a small scale experiment, only 2-3 people like
Sean0913 said. That's just to see how everything works out. Yeah, practice makes
perfect, just have to start somewhere.