#1
I know the main idea about it, Borrowing chords from the parrallel scale.

So I'll Just use a C Major and minor scale.

C D E F G A B C
C D Eb F G Ab Bb C

Can I borrow any chord from the parallel scale or is there some sort of theory behind choosing the chords?
If I was doing a I IV V in C major
(C F G)
Could I just throw any chord from the Cm scale anywhere in that progression and it would be correct theory wise?
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Last edited by Metallicuh at Jun 7, 2011,
#3
so if I put an Fm in between the C and the F it would be a I iv IV V
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#4
Quote by Metallicuh
so if I put an Fm in between the C and the F it would be a I iv IV V

Now, I could be wrong on this, BUT I believe you might be right. Im not the best on theory though so u'll prolly get a better answer then this lol
#5
Quote by Metallicuh
so if I put an Fm in between the C and the F it would be a I iv IV V

Yes, that's correct.
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#6
Theory wise yes; random sonic cohesion...much trickier. Knowing how and when to use it, involves theory, an ability to analyze voice leading modulations and cadences, and a historical understanding of many different compositions where you can see where something was used, where it came from and how it sounded.

Best,

Sean
#8
There's no such thing as being correct "theory-wise", I'm not sure where you got that idea, theory is descriptive not prescriptive.

But to try and adress the question, it is probably more common for the major chords to be borrowed from the parallel minor than minor chords. Eg. In C major, the chords Ab Bb and Eb are often used in progressions along with chords diatonic to C major.

The Fm in the F Fm C progression could be seen as being borrowed from C minor I guess but I usually just view it as a standard plagal (IV-I) cadence with the Ab as a passing note which strengthens the A to G resolution by going A Ab G.

However, as Sean said, there is a lot more to using borrowed chords than simply putting chord progressions together randomly from a selection of chords. For the most part borrowed chords need good voice leading or a suitable melody on top to make them sound good (eg. play the progression B, A, D, E - it probably sounded a bit off. Now sing Fell In Love With A Girl over it and see how good it sounds).

There are no simples rules we can give you for that. I suggest either looking further into the theory of harmony, or alternatively just analyzing and learning some songs with borrowed chords and experimenting a bit yourself, or for best results both.