#2
Inversions are basically a different voicing of a chord based on what the root note is.

C E G <- 1st inversion of Cmaj
E G C <- 2nd inversion of Cmaj (3rd in the bass)
G C E <- 3rd inversion (5th in the bass)

For example, G E C would also be a third inversion (as far as I was taught...).
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#3
Quote by AntiG3
Inversions are basically a different voicing of a chord based on what the root note is.

C E G <- Cmaj
E G C <- 1st inversion of Cmaj (3rd in the bass)
G C E <- 2nd inversion (5th in the bass)

For example, G E C would also be a second inversion (as far as I was taught...).

^fixed
TS heres a good lesson on inversions.
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/42
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#4
by the way, if you have a seventh chord, lets say, c dominant, would Bb G C E the third inversion?
#7
Quote by Usernames sucks
Ok thanks! By the way, in a G dominant9 chord, Would a in the bass be 1st or 4th inversion? (since the 9 is the 2nd scale tone).


That's a good question. I've generally seen this written as a G7/A. Sometimes, the bass note just doesn't fit with the chord: it causes a lot of tension and begs to be resolved. I would definitely just call it a G7/A if it was part of a long moving bassline, e.g. one that goes: B - A - G - G with the G7 constantly over top of it.

Now that I think about it, if you had to call it an inversion (and didn't just chalk it up to an out-of-key bassline, I would think a 9th interval would be a fourth inversion since it is higher up than the b7. The key point here would be that it is called a 9th rather than a 2nd.
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Last edited by soviet_ska at Jun 8, 2011,
#8
4th

1st inversion would be the 3rd in the bass...even though the A is the 2nd in the scale, it is the 9th in the chord.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#9
There's no such thing as 4th inversion, it only goes up to third. Putting extensions in the bass is going to result in a change of function and a change of chord.
#11
If you don't mind me adding a couple questions to this thread.... I've been thinking about this for a while.

Is the open A minor chord on the guitar some form of an inversion because it goes A-E-C instead of A-C-E?

Does the order of the 2 notes which aren't the bass note change the type of chord it is?

Thanks
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#13
Good to know, Thanks!
Guitars
Fender MIM Strat (Modded)
Tokai Love Rock
Squier Strat (Modded)

Effects
Boss DS-1, DD-7, RC-20XL
EHX Big Muff, Electric Mistress
Digitech Whammy

Amps
Vox VT50
Orange Rockerverb 50
#14
leaning inversions in both triads and 4 note chords - in all keys - opens the fretboard..and adds to the understanding of diatonic harmony

worth the effort to learn them
#15
Joe Pass wrote a somewhat cryptic book about chords -- I forget the name, you can Google it ... it is a treasure trove of info on this stuff from a master.

Since he was fluent in chord solos, you can imagine that his understanding of "chord" on a guitar was much broader than what you will see in a standard music theory book. He thought in terms of function -- so he explains how to use different inversions and voicings to play through a chord sheet. But he also goes on to explain how to reharmonize in jazz .. so, for example, with the right voicing one can play an Amin7 in place of a CMaj7 or how and when to use a tritone substitution or where to use extensions or altered extensions to get a particular sound.