#1
hi i was wondering what are the differences in the two woods and which is better? i may swap my basswood cort for an alder jackson with a forum member but i want to make sure im going to like the wood, now i played a jackson a little over a year ago and loved it! but i have developed an ear for tone now so i want to make sure im not making a mistake, i mainly play things such as metallica and older stuff like black sabbath but i would also like to know if the wood will affect the clean tone
#2
Basswood is a little warmer, alder is clearer and more open, but the tonal differences between woods are extremely subtle. Alder gives you a tiny, tiny bit more sustain. Alder is lighter, physically, but only a bit. It's also associated with low-quality guitars, which really isn't fair--Kurt Cobain, Joe Satriani and Eddie Van Halen all paid good money for custom guitars made of basswood.
Ultimately, if you like everything else about a guitar, the wood won't make much of a difference.
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#4
yeah pretty much as aeolian 7th said.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#5
From my own personal opinion, Basswood is a bit of a dull sounding kind of wood. Its darker sounding then alder which to me sounds more neutral sounds.
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#6
well its the jackson rr3 i may be swapping for which also has emgs(which i love) so i am very tempted after hearing this, thanks alot guys!
#7
Basswood is more transparent, it's kind of a "shred-guitar wood" to me.
Alder has more highs and more lows than basswood.
#8
i think that settles it id prefer alder as i dont play shred and i like scooping the mids out of my tone
#9
I found all this information on the Warmoth.com Website. They have all kinds of answers to these kinds of questions.


Alder is used extensively for bodies because of its lighter weight (about four pounds for a Strat® body) and its full sound. Its closed grain makes this wood easy to finish. Alder's natural color is a light tan with little or no distinct grain lines. It looks good with a sunburst or a solid color finish. Because of its fine characteristics and lower price, Alder is our most popular wood and it grows all around us here in Washington State. The tone is reputed to be most balanced with equal doses of lows, mids and highs. Alder has been the mainstay for Fender bodies for many years and its characteristic tone has been a part of some of the most enduring pieces of modern day contemporary music.

This is a lighter weight wood normally producing Strat® bodies under 4 lbs. The color is white, but often has nasty green mineral streaks in it. This is a closed-grain wood, but it can absorb a lot of finish. This is not a good wood for clear finishes since there is little figure. It is quite soft, and does not take abuse well. Sound-wise, Basswood has a nice, growley, warm tone with good mids. A favorite tone wood for shredders in the 80s since its defined sound cuts through a mix well.


Basswood is a little warmer than alder

Anyway I hope that you found this helpful.
#10
Just remember that most of these differences in sound, weight and feel only apply to actual good quality alder and basswood. If you're looking at guitars under $700 or so then the difference between alder and basswood in that price range is basically nothing.
#11
Quote by JesusCrisp
Basswood is more transparent, it's kind of a "shred-guitar wood" to me.
Alder has more highs and more lows than basswood.


yeah that'd be what i'd sorta say too.

though the bit of extra brightness of alder also works well for those 80s tones.

I guess the way i'd say it is that basswood is more sorta like the shred instrumental albums- satriani and stuff like that. alder is more like the 80s hair metal bands.

i mean in a superstrat which has a trem the differences are going to be pretty subtle anyway.

this is probably a massive oversimplification (if not outright wrong), but it's just struck me that basswood is probably a bit like a tubescreamer only made of wood
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jun 8, 2011,