#1
well, here is another scale question, as i see in the musician talk threads there are alot of these kind of questions, but i was noodling in A minor pentatonic and i thought what if i added the regular third to the scale as well, i liked the sound and would like to know what the scale is called.

So my scale here goes A C C# D E G
any idea what would be the name of the scale?
#2
To the best of my knowledge, what you're doing is borrowing the major third from A minor's parallel major key (A major).
This is a common technique employed in Blues music, as the major third can function as both a passing tone between chords in a progression, or function to alter the tonic A minor seventh (I bIII V bvII) into an A dominant seventh (I III V bVII); a voicing characteristic of the genre.
Last edited by juckfush at Jun 8, 2011,
#3
Quote by Jacobrivers8
well, here is another scale question, as i see in the musician talk threads there are alot of these kind of questions, but i was noodling in A minor pentatonic and i thought what if i added the regular third to the scale as well, i liked the sound and would like to know what the scale is called.

So my scale here goes A C C# D E G
any idea what would be the name of the scale?


Blues scale. Very common, very good choice. Using both thirds in either a minor/major scale gives you a real bluesy sound. Keep on playin'!
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
Actually, the blues scale in A would be

1, b3, 4, b5, 5, b7
A - C- D- Eb- E- G- A

it's the #4/b5 that's the "blue" note, so the D, Eb, E has a nice chromatic sound.
Last edited by Calibos at Jun 9, 2011,
#5
Quote by Calibos
Actually, the blues scale in A would be

1, b3, 4, b5, 5, b7
A - C- D- Eb- E- G- A

it's the #4/b5 that's the "blue" note, so the D, Eb, E has a nice chromatic sound.


Ahem, right, so...a pentatonic with a blue note, then.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
It's a borrowed Major 3rd, Juckflush had it dead on. It's a cool outside note. Because of the presence of both the M3 and the b7 many people call it a Mixolydian, and others call it a Dominant Pentatonic (especially when the m3 is substituted with the M3. It's one of my favorite scales for breaking up a typical blues.) Some of my students here will recognize this from Academy Lecture 13 or 14 in Lead Guitar 1. (If you're not there yet, just wait *cough*Calibos*cough* Homework*cough*)

In the late 80's a band formed out of members who all went to GIT called "School of Fish" used this scale to great effect in a riff from a song called "3 Strange Days". It wasn't used in a blues way at all, it was rather psychedelic.

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 9, 2011,