#1
Ive never recorded before so i have no idea. I want to basicly mic my amp and use that to record. So if a bought the reaper program and a good dynamic microphone and good headphones, what else am i going to need to buy? Or any other suggestions for cost effective ways to record. Im really looking to stay under about $250. Im also only looking into micing the am i have and not buying a pod or anything since i just bought a really awesome Egnater.
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#2
You need an audio interface (e.g. Focusrite Saffire 6 USB), a good microphone and a recording software. Maybe headphones.
#3
All you really need is
computer (with a microphone/line in input on the sound card, hard pressed to find one that doesn't)
microphone (you could get an audio interface or mixer if you want, but if you have an adapter to 1/8" you can plug it right in.)
recording software (Audacity is free and great)

If you really want to spend some money, I would put the money into a good microphone for now, as that will always serve you.

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jthm_guitarist
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#4
Quote by jthm_guitarist
All you really need is
computer (with a microphone/line in input on the sound card, hard pressed to find one that doesn't)
microphone (you could get an audio interface or mixer if you want, but if you have an adapter to 1/8" you can plug it right in.)
recording software (Audacity is free and great)

If you really want to spend some money, I would put the money into a good microphone for now, as that will always serve you.


No.


Buy a mic (lots of people will suggest a Shure SM57) and an interface. Reaper is a good choice for your DAW, and I'm not sure how much you were looking to spend on headphones, but if you're going to mix/master on them, try to get a pair that has flat response.
#5
Quote by jthm_guitarist
All you really need is
computer (with a microphone/line in input on the sound card, hard pressed to find one that doesn't)
microphone (you could get an audio interface or mixer if you want, but if you have an adapter to 1/8" you can plug it right in.)
recording software (Audacity is free and great)

If you really want to spend some money, I would put the money into a good microphone for now, as that will always serve you.


I know i can do that, but im looking for as much quality as possible in my budget
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr


There are three places: "where you were", "where you are" and "where you want to be".


Story of my life
#6
I am 16, low budget..

-I am using an old windows XP computer.
-I use Audacity for the recoring interface as its very effective and free!
-And I have a Digitech RP-150 Multi-effects guitar pedal. I bought it for about £90 (I think it was). Using it I record straight into the pc using the USB port. Its great! (Check out my recordings to see the quality I get..)

I don't have much experience but IMO this works out great and I spent no more than £100 on it all. If your just looking to get started with recording and stuff I'd recommend it.
#7
Cheapest Acceptable Way: Buy an interface. Plug in and use free amp simulators + impulses (which in my opinion sound better 90% of the time because most people can't mic an amp for dick.) Get flat response headphones.

Preferably: Get an interface + free amp simulators + free impulses. Get as close to flat response monitors as possible.

Even Better: Preferably: Get an interface + free amp simulators + free impulses. Get as close to flat response monitors and headphones as possible.

Even better than even better: Even Better: Preferably: Get an interface + free amp simulators + free impulses. Get as close to flat response monitors and headphones as possible. Get a mic to mic an amp (and learn how to do it correctly unlike 90% of people who post ).

In conclusion: Just get an interface and some headphones and plug in. You can get an interface and flat response headphones in your price range easily. Start with using amp sims + impulses from LePou, TSE, etc. that are free. When you get money get a SM57 (if it tickles your fancy) and practice micing an amp.

To be honest though, most the people who tell you to mic your amp on this forum have worse tone than most people get on amp sims. In fact most of them have no idea what there talking about in general on this forum so eh Anyway the whole micing amp vs. amp sims debate is similar to the whole analog vs. digital debate imo. Personally I side with amp sims and digital every time, in reality neither matter much if you know how to do them correctly. </end rant>
Last edited by FireHawk at Jun 9, 2011,
#8
I find that the amp sims always sound best when mixed in with "real" miked guitars.

CT
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#9
The guitar tracks on this recording are through a mic'd amp (with the exception of a background acoustic track, mixed so low you probably wouldn't hear it without headphones). The solo's mediocre, but the guitar tone's pretty great, if I do say so myself. Solo's around 2:30 to 3:00 and then after the choruses around 4:00.

I'm using a large diaphragm condenser mic (the AT-2020 to be precise) placed probably six feet from the amp in a large, cluttered room, and then running it through a powered mixer. Line out from the mixer to the microphone jack on my computer into Audacity, which has been mentioned here before. I have the amp turned up to about 4, which is plenty loud (the Fender Twin's an 85 watt tube beast - much more than that, I save for a soundproofed studio...). I have the mixer's input relatively low and the output relatively high. That way, I'm not overdriving the computer's microphone input. I add leveling and compression in the mix.

For what it's worth, I also have Reason and Reaper, but I usually bump sequencer tracks to Audacity and record any live tracks there. Sometimes, I'll bump back to Reason for the mix, 'cause Audacity's mix interface is clunky. But it works. The song I linked to above, I programmed the rhythm stuff in Reason and did the rest in Audacity.

peace
Last edited by Nilchii at Jun 10, 2011,