#1
So I understand how music sheets work (treble clef etc) and that they show notes.
What I dont understand is how im supposed to find that note on the guitar.

Say for example, a G. There are 12 possible choices to play this G note (6 strings, 24 frets), how do I figure out which fret the note is referring to?

Thanks!
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Originally posted by GOD
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#2
Well for that specific pitch there are not 12 choices for a start. EG the g string falls on the second line from the bottom on the treble clef and there are only 3 other places you can play that exact g eg 5 frets down on the next thickest string.
#3
For one -- guitar players play everything an octave below what is written -- or a lot of guitar would be in the bass clef.

So -- middle C (written) can only be played in two places -- 3rd fret of the A string or 8th fret of the low E string.

From there -- one method is to learn "positional playing" -- if you are playing frets 0 to 3, you choices are pretty well defined.

Same if you are playing on frets 3 to 6, 5 to 8, 7 to 12 ... then it all repeats.

So -- yes, there is more than one place to play the same pitch and often many places to play the same note, but as long as you understand that middle C, written, is played as C on the A string at the 3rd fret, you know where to start.

The problem is that knowing how to read and reading are two different things -- this is like saying "I know the letters in the Greek alphabet" vs "I am reading Homer in the original Greek".

You will learn that effective reading takes a fair amount of practice.

I recommend "A Modern Method For Guitar" by William Leavitt.
#4
it really depends on your preference and what pitch you need. if it doesnt give you a specific pitch (it generally doesnt), then you can play it in any position you feel comfortable. some common positions for G could be open, 3rd fret, 7th fret, but you could play it anywhere on the fretboard once you learn the different shapes of scales.

My advice to you would be to learn the 7 shapes of a Major scale. it is quite possibly the most helpful thing you will learn while playing guitar.
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#5
Well, that's a personnal choice, there are no rules for that. You just gotta choose the fret according to the ease of playing, and how you want the note to sound.

If you are asking about the pitch of the note, well you have to look at which octave it belongs to. For exemple, if your G belongs to this octave :

...Then it's a G4, and there is only 4 possible G4 on the neck of a six strings guitar in standart E tuning : G string fret 0 / D string fret 5 / A string fret 10 / E string fret 15.
If it's an octave lower, it's a G3, etc...

I hope I replied to your question.
Last edited by Etidlover at Jun 9, 2011,
#6
Quote by Etidlover
Well, that's a personnal choice, there are no rules for that. You just gotta choose the fret according to the ease of playing, and how you want the note to sound.

If you are asking about the pitch of the note, well you have to look at which octave it belongs to. For exemple, if your G belongs to this octave :

...Then it's a G4, and there is only 4 possible G4 on the neck of a six strings guitar in standart E tuning : G string fret 0 / D string fret 5 / A string fret 10 / E string fret 15.
If it's an octave lower, it's a G3, etc...

I hope I replied to your question.



That note is G3 on guitar. It is G4 in concert pitch but we read an octave off from standard concert pitch.

EDIT: Guitar is tuned:

E2 A2 D3 G3 B3 E4

Otherwise, you are correct, there are 4 placed to play that on a guitar, the open G string one
Last edited by Zen Skin at Jun 9, 2011,
#7
Quote by TK1
it really depends on your preference and what pitch you need. if it doesnt give you a specific pitch (it generally doesnt), then you can play it in any position you feel comfortable. ....



Please explain.

so the G on the G clef is any pitch the OP wants to play??

All those composers who wrote 8va above or below the staff were just kidding?