#1
I just recently bought a Les Paul and from what I understand Gibson recommends putting .010 gauge strings on it? I've been pretty loyal to using 0.009 gauge Ernie Ball strings however I recently decided to switch to 0.010 gauge strings, 0.009 gauge makes me feel like a lightweight if you know what I mean, they also seem to wear out a LOT faster. Correct me if I'm wrong but using a slightly heavier gauge should enable me to play with slightly lower action, correct?

What gauge strings would you guys use for a Strat and a Les Paul in standard tuning?
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#2
pretty sure ur wrong... if anything u'll get more fret buzz if u have low action with a higher gauge string. use watever u feel like using. if u like 9's, use them. if u like 10's, use em.
#3
heavier gauge allows slightly lower action, but the difference is not that much in my opinion. i use 009 on my les paul studio and have no problems at all, even when shredding.
#4
Well, you can play with whatever action you like, really, but what makes heavier gauges more accessible is the fact that they require more tension to attain pitch.

The string is thicker, therefore to attain the same tone it must have more tension pulling on it. This means that when you lower the strings down and fret a note, it'll utilize more of that tension to ring in a more controlled and sustainable way. That's why big metal players and hard rock players don't use .09's usually. When you drop tune the slack in the string tends to cause unsteady and out of phase waves along the string length, causing it to hit the fretboard and buzz and all sorts of other shenanigans.

Although, the difference between 10's and 9's in action might not be noticeable depending on the company. Ernie Ball's Regular and Super Slinky's only differentiate on the top 3 strings. They're still 42, 36, and 24w on the bottom end.

What genre do you play?
#5
String gauge is pretty personal, they feel different and sound different.

I like the sound of 11-52s but they feel stiff, so I just use standard 10s. Some people go to 13s, others like 8s because they bend easy. Also music style can affect it, playing virtuoso stuff may sound better with lighter gauges, maybe metal rhythm you stick on 11s.

I dont think you can really tighten the action that much on a string change, not a huge difference in the width of the strings movement when vibrating.
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#6
Quote by JustRooster
Well, you can play with whatever action you like, really, but what makes heavier gauges more accessible is the fact that they require more tension to attain pitch.

The string is thicker, therefore to attain the same tone it must have more tension pulling on it. This means that when you lower the strings down and fret a note, it'll utilize more of that tension to ring in a more controlled and sustainable way. That's why big metal players and hard rock players don't use .09's usually. When you drop tune the slack in the string tends to cause unsteady and out of phase waves along the string length, causing it to hit the fretboard and buzz and all sorts of other shenanigans.

Although, the difference between 10's and 9's in action might not be noticeable depending on the company. Ernie Ball's Regular and Super Slinky's only differentiate on the top 3 strings. They're still 42, 36, and 24w on the bottom end.

What genre do you play?

Regular slinkys have a 46 not a 42
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#7
Gibson suggests that because almost all of their guitars are 24.75" scale, and using .010s on a guitar with a 24.75" scale feels closer to using .009s on a guitar with a 25.5" scale.

The shorter scale length gives the strings more slack so .009's may feel a bit too loose on it for your tastes. However, it is all down to personal preference.
#8
Quote by Pac_man0123
Gibson suggests that because almost all of their guitars are 24.75" scale, and using .010s on a guitar with a 24.75" scale feels closer to using .009s on a guitar with a 25.5" scale.

The shorter scale length gives the strings more slack so .009's may feel a bit too loose on it for your tastes. However, it is all down to personal preference.

This.

Couldn't have said it better myself.
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#9
Both my strats came equiped with Fender Super Bullets (09-42), but I prefer Ernie Ball Regular Slinkies (10-46) so that I can achieve low action with less buzz.

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#11
Quote by Pac_man0123
Gibson suggests that because almost all of their guitars are 24.75" scale, and using .010s on a guitar with a 24.75" scale feels closer to using .009s on a guitar with a 25.5" scale.

The shorter scale length gives the strings more slack so .009's may feel a bit too loose on it for your tastes. However, it is all down to personal preference.



This is exactly what I was going to say. There won't be much impact on the tone, if any. I use 11s on my Epi LP.
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#12
Quote by Pac_man0123
Gibson suggests that because almost all of their guitars are 24.75" scale, and using .010s on a guitar with a 24.75" scale feels closer to using .009s on a guitar with a 25.5" scale.

The shorter scale length gives the strings more slack so .009's may feel a bit too loose on it for your tastes. However, it is all down to personal preference.


You guys are awesome, that makes perfect sense. I was wondering why switching to 0.010s felt so much better on that guitar than my Strat.
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#13
Quote by jimmyjimbo72
Both my strats came equiped with Fender Super Bullets (09-42), but I prefer Ernie Ball Regular Slinkies (10-46) so that I can achieve low action with less buzz.


+1 on the Ernie ball

I use 10-46 on the Jackson

The Ibby is tuned to drop D and has 10-52
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#14
Quote by Pac_man0123
Gibson suggests that because almost all of their guitars are 24.75" scale, and using .010s on a guitar with a 24.75" scale feels closer to using .009s on a guitar with a 25.5" scale.

The shorter scale length gives the strings more slack so .009's may feel a bit too loose on it for your tastes. However, it is all down to personal preference.

that's true.