#1
Hey everyone, just need a little help really.

I used to write metal quite a lot, and it wasn't too bad really. However, over the past few months, I've been in a couple of pop-punk bands, which has obviously taken my music writing in that direction.

I want to get back into writing some good metal, but I can't seem to string a good song together without it sounding either not very heavy or just not very good.

My main influences were Machine Head, Trivium and Alter Bridge, and I used to write quite groove-based songs, ala Pantera (and also Machine Head's new song, Locust)

So I was wondering, is there any theory other than modes that will help me get back into writing like I used to?

TL,DR; i want to go back to writing metal in the style of Machine Head and Trivium, any theory to help?
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#2
"So I was wondering, is there any theory other than modes that will help me get back into writing like I used to?"

tbh Modes wont help you much if you don't understand what they are used for, so don't worry about that at the moment.

As for writing in the style of, just learn Machine Head and Trivium songs. Disect the songs and see whats going on theoretically.

Theres really not much i can say, alot of metal bands just play pentatonics but in a different style as other genres use.
#3
I was hoping on something different after seeing the title =(

There isn't a whole lot to discuss theoretically with bands in that style. I would advice to look at some of their songs, and take a look what they are doing.
#4
I think it's more to do with the style of those bands, rather than the theory.
The riffs, The drums, the breakdown sorta deal.

As the guy said, just play songs of that genre and take a close look at the rhythms and patterns.

As for solos, every metal guitarist has his own style. Pentatonic licks of all kinds. Sweep picking. Dual guitar parts. Wah in aboot that. So many other things.
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#9
I was going to ignore him as I don't mod MT but he's been spamming all over the places so best to nip it in the bud...I'm sure it was only a matter of time before he turned up in GT.
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#11
If only I had a quid for everytime KYMonster said "What you really need is a new amp..."

OT
- Generally aggressive
- Loud dynamics
- Most metal is in 4/4. Technical metal styles can use different time siggies
- Usually include solo sections

This is just a general guide. There are loads of metal subgenres and they each have different things pertaining to their style.
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#12
Break down the progression and see what they are.
Like a "phrygian" progression would be iii5 IV5 i5.
So basically powerchords and really check out the progressions, if you notice a specific sound from a chord change look at the voice leading.
Or if you like a particular chord look at the chord.
#15
Metal sounds like shit to me!!!! XDXD
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#16
Quote by Keth
Voiceleading in metal?



You would only see that done in very, VERY specific situations/bands.

Isn't it just the intervals betweent he 2 chords?
#18
Quote by Keth
No, not 'just' the interval between two chords.

Whatever you do, don't expand upon your post to help others learn! No one wants that.
#19
Believe me, I've helped people on this forum before, and I've tried to help Liampje before, along with other regulars. He still comes back every time stating knowledge about a subject he doesn't understand yet. It kinda grows tiresome to fully correct him every time.

If you'd like, I could expand on my post, though.
#20
Quote by Keth
Believe me, I've helped people on this forum before, and I've tried to help Liampje before, along with other regulars. He still comes back every time stating knowledge about a subject he doesn't understand yet. It kinda grows tiresome to fully correct him every time.

If you'd like, I could expand on my post, though.


If you could that'd be awesome, cause I'll probably learn something. I didn't know that the guy gets help and keeps returning like a dumbass though, I apologize. People like that piss me off because they just waste time.
It's spelled wiener.
#21
Well, it's not a problem that he keeps coming back for help, it's more that he comes back without a solid base on previous subjects, and posts posts like the one he did in this thread.

I'll try to keep this short, since I was planning on going to bed (about 2 hours ago..).
Say you have two chords, C major and F major. There are all kinds of combinations that you can play them, depending on how many parts you have (typically four in a choir, for example), or how many notes your instrument can play (6 for guitar, for example). Let's assume a typical 4 part choir, with a soprano, tenor, alto and bass (SATB).

You could have the choir sing:

S -- C - F
A -- G - C
T -- E - A
B -- C - F


Both in root position, and every note moves up a fourth. Every note moves in the same direction, and all with the same interval. That doesn't make for a very interesting listen, in fact, it sounds pretty awful and jumpy. This is how you would perhaps play it on guitar, or perhaps made by a very bad/lazy composer. If we consider every part to be a separate line, and focus on making every part sound good/flow, we're focusing on voice leading.

S -- C - C
A -- G - A
T -- E - F
B -- C - A

Now every part has it's own line, the soprano holds the C twice as long as the others, the alto moves up a major second, tenor moves up a minor second and the bass moves down a major third. Not only does the chord change sounds a lot smoother, you've also created four separate parts that move independent from each other.
Last edited by Keth at Jun 17, 2011,