#1
Really want to be able to get as close to a professional recording sound as I can. I am limited on cash, but I can always save up. I already own:

Shure SM58 Microphone
Epiphone Les Paul Special II Guitar
Audacity
A cheap computer mic

Help!?
#6
Well, how close to professional, really? What do you intend to do with these recordings? Do you want to post them on reverb nation to share with friends and to get gigs? Do you want to press CD's to sell at shows or to upload and sell in iTunes?

These are important questions. You might be out of your league with a budget that considers Audacity and a cheap computer mic to be usable equipment.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by axemanchris
Well, how close to professional, really? What do you intend to do with these recordings? Do you want to post them on reverb nation to share with friends and to get gigs? Do you want to press CD's to sell at shows or to upload and sell in iTunes?

These are important questions. You might be out of your league with a budget that considers Audacity and a cheap computer mic to be usable equipment.

CT


so which interface is enough for making professional solo albums like andy james solo albums?
which setup is good enough for recording a thrash metal band's live show or abum?
which is interface is good for making demos and eps?
and which is good enough to record and put on reverb nation and get gigs?
Gears:
Ibanez RG2550Z GK
Marshall TSL 122 Combo
Digitech GNX4
Boss DS2
Roland MicroCube
#8
All four of those things? Because those are four different jobs.

In order to do all four of those things, you would need high enough quality for "release quality" with enough inputs for a full band. Anything that meets that criteria will cover you for #1 and 2, and by default (because they are less demanding), will cover #3 and 4.

So, you're looking pretty much in the $1000 and up range.

But that's only the beginning. You want release quality? Be prepared to spend many times that on the following:
-mics
-monitors
-software
-room treatment
-cables, stands, etc.
-other "doo-dads" - DI boxes, headphones, clips, etc.

... and be prepared to spend a number of years learning how to do it all, too, if you want professional quality....

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
[QUOTE
... and be prepared to spend a number of years learning how to do it all, too, if you want professional quality....

CT

^ +1. Profesional recording doesn't just happen from good gear. It takes a long time to figure everything out and develop an ear for it. From little things like positioning mics to properly EQing a mix theres a ton of things you have to learn.

Oh and I don't think anyone mentioned it yet but a better daw will help. Look for Reaper.
#10
That SM58 will go a long way -- though you may want to invest in an SM57 for versatility. Taking the ball off of the SM58 does not make it the same as the SM57, even though they both have the same capsule. For kick drums and bass amps you will want a different microphone made to capture those lower frequencies, and for your cymbals/overheads you will likely want some small diaphragm condensers. Toms and snare can be close-miked with dynamics like the SM57 or just captured in the overheads. Many prefer large diaphragm condensers for acoustic guitar, vocals, and other acoustic instruments though many still prefer dynamic microphones for vocals and if you haven't treated your room acoustically, a dynamic is your best bet.

As already mentioned, you will need an audio interface -- if you plan on recording drums, you are going to be looking at a FireWire interface to be able to record several mics simultaneously onto their own tracks. This is a must when recording drums so you can mix and EQ the drum tracks properly.

Audacity will not do much for you in the realm of music production, so as ultimate-rocker stated, try Reaper -- it is kind-sorta-free, but not really. They want you to pay the $40 for it but it never forces you to.

You will need to tune your operating system up to make the most of all the processing power you have, and there are plenty of guides for that available online.

Past your physical (and digital) setup, it comes down to the art of production which is another instrument in itself. For guitar players especially, it is all too common to scoop the mids resulting in a tone that doesn't play well with the other instruments in the mix, and to give the guitar too much volume. The more you mess with it and listen to your favorite tracks and the tracks on the radio, you will gather more of a feel for how loud certain instruments tend to be and what frequencies they sit best at in the mix.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#11
I've read a ton of things about the difference between recording straight to a computer and recording separately.
My goal is to record guitar, vocals, a 5-STRING bass (something that needs to pick up a low A), and drums (WITHOUT hearing only the impact rather than the sound of the drum, as I do with my cheap computer mic.)
I play Hard Rock and Punk music, if it matters.
I want the effects of pedals available if you recommend recording straight through a computer, which many people have said specifically not to do for this reason.

Will someone tell me which one is better? And why?
#13
if you want to save money and not buy an interface you could get a USB mic. they're nowhere near as good as a shure with an interface but they are a lot cheaper and you can get reasonably god results with a bit of practice. if you are going down that route id recommend the T-Bone MB88U dual from thomann. its a dual XLR/USB mic and its modelled on the shure SM57. iv used it in the past for recording and stage vox and its always worked well. one issue i had with it though was that the cable shipped with it was quite short and it was picking up static from my laptop when i was recording but that went when i get a longer cable
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Tell me what nation on this earth, was not born of tragedy-Primordial
#14
Quote by gateway01
I've read a ton of things about the difference between recording straight to a computer and recording separately.

My goal is to record guitar, vocals, a 5-STRING bass (something that needs to pick up a low A), and drums (WITHOUT hearing only the impact rather than the sound of the drum, as I do with my cheap computer mic.)
I play Hard Rock and Punk music, if it matters.
I want the effects of pedals available if you recommend recording straight through a computer, which many people have said specifically not to do for this reason.

Will someone tell me which one is better? And why?
If you want to record drums well (IMO), you're going to want a FireWire interface with 8 inputs so you can have the ability to record several microphones at once and mix them/EQ them later -- of course, you'll need the collection of mics for the drum kit as well.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#15
Quote by james.hetfield

and which is good enough to record and put on reverb nation and get gigs?


Exactly what I want to know!

Well, I also want to make some sort of cd/album to listen to myself and hand out to friends.