#1
Probably a stupid noob question, but yeah, I want to know.
Last edited by birdycofir at Jun 10, 2011,
#3
Because if all your fingers move at once for no point its a waste of efficiency. It slows you down, gives you less control, and limits the scales and chords you can play.

Thats why its important to have finger independance.
#4
Quote by vayne92
I don't see it as necessary at all really.

Then you'll never be as good as you want to be.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
But are there any like professional guitarists that are held back by poor finger independance and that dedicate time to solely improving finger independance? I assumed it would just happen naturally as you improve from practising anything?
#6
Quote by vayne92
But are there any like professional guitarists that are held back by poor finger independance and that dedicate time to solely improving finger independance? I assumed it would just happen naturally as you improve from practising anything?

Up to a point, and not nearly as fast as it could.

This question is answered for me, because I know that if I spend an hour or so doing Freepower's wondrous (if mind-numbing) exercise I can instantly play with much better control.
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#7
It seems to me like an incredibly 'minor' technique that any beginner to intermediate player wouldn't focus on? I can see some really advanced players dedicating time to improving it, but for beginners to intermediate i can see many more priorities.
Steve Vai for example i can see practising finger independance. OP practising finger independance, well i'd be suprised. Would noone agree with me on that?
Last edited by vayne92 at Jun 10, 2011,
#8
Quote by birdycofir
Probably a stupid noob question, but yeah, I want to know.



Because you want to, if not, then don't, not to tough..


Wow lots of commas?
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#9
Quote by vayne92
It seems to me like an incredibly 'minor' technique that any beginner to intermediate player wouldn't focus on? I can see some really advanced players dedicating time to improving it, but for beginners to intermediate i can see many more priorities.
Steve Vai for example i can see practising finger independance. OP practising finger independance, well i'd be suprised. Would noone agree with me on that?


Far from it - it's a fundamental principle of good technique, regardless of how fast or slow you intend to play.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#10
Quote by steven seagull
Far from it - it's a fundamental principle of good technique, regardless of how fast or slow you intend to play.


Exactly, it doesn't matter if you're playing 3 chords or some insane arpeggio lick, if you don't have good finger independance it takes much longer to switch between chords, leaving a "Void" where there should be sound, but instead, you're still trying to switch shapes... Thus, it is essential for players of every skill level.

(Im listening to this ATM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avu6wLJ7LIA)
#11
Quote by Life Is Brutal
if you don't have good finger independance it takes much longer to switch between chords, leaving a "Void" where there should be sound, but instead, you're still trying to switch shapes... Thus, it is essential for players of every skill level


I never really considered chord changes to be classified under finger independance but now that i think about it more, i would say you're right. So based on that, i would now definitely say finger independance is important.
#12
Quote by vayne92
Steve Vai for example i can see practising finger independance. OP practising finger independance, well i'd be suprised. Would noone agree with me on that?

To the contrary, Vai has little need to "practice" finger independence these days.

In his early development years however, he did devote hours per day to that sort of work.

You can hear the results.
#14
Finger independence is really useful. It's one of the major factors in how well your fretting hand works (chords, lead, whatever) - so if you're using your fretting hand, it's worth practising.

It's also severely overlooked. It's easy to built strength and stamina (play a lot!) but you actually need to concentrate on this stuff.

And it's massive for beginners, actually. One of the main problems beginners have is that their fingers "fly" way way off the fretboard, making it more work to play and much harder to fret accurately. Guess what fixes this problem?

(and you don't have to do super dull exercises, perfectly possible to do with learning riffs or licks)

If you aren't too fussed, don't bother about it. I always suggest trying it 10 mins a day for a week. If you see results you like, stick with it. If not, you learnt that that method of practice doesn't really work for you.
#15
It's important so you have more control over your fingers, so you can tell your fingers to do what you want them to do, and they will do it with as little effort as possible and as fast as possible. This is kinda useful when you're kinda playing guitar right?
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Jun 10, 2011,